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LibGDX Video Tutorial Series

LibGDX Tutorial Series

Welcome to the GameFromScratch.com LibGDX tutorial series. Select a link below to expand and view the video. Each video is available in 1080p resolution on YouTube. Where applicable, there will also be a post to a page with full source examples for each tutorial. If you prefer text based tutorials to video, please start here instead.

Configuring Java and Android SDKs for LibGDX Development

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This tutorial walks through setting up a Java development environment for working with LibGDX. We walk through installing the Java JDK, the Android SDK, Google GWT then finally, creating a project with LibGDX.

Using the Eclipse IDE with LibGDX

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This tutorial shows how to use Eclipse with LibGDX. This includes importing your project, configuring the required plugins and running an Android, HTML and Desktop application.

Using the IntelliJ IDE with LibGDX

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This tutorial shows how to use IntelliJ IDEA with LibGDX. This includes importing your project, configuring the required plugins and running an Android, HTML and Desktop application.

Configuring an Android Device for Debugging (Windows Only)

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This quick video shows how to setup your Android device for debugging. It mostly covers the process of installing the required driver so that Eclipse or IntelliJ can see your phone. Also links to a document that instructs you on how to enable Developer Mode on Android 4.x devices.

Hello World! A LibGDX Introduction. Using Sprites and Textures. ( Coding Starts Here )

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial we look at coding our very first LibGDX application. We cover the basics of a LibGDX project, project layout and adding assets. We then look at the skeleton project that is created for us, the coordinate systems, loading a texture. Finally we stop by creating a sprite, then look at position, rotating and scaling.

Using Fonts and Text

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

This tutorial looks at how you use text in LibGDX. We discuss the difference between TTF and Bitmap fonts, look at creating a font using the Heiro font tool, then look at the code needed to load and display the text in LibGDX. This includes more advanced concepts like text justification, measuring and placement.

Handling Keyboard, Mouse and Touch input

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

This video tutorial looks at handling mouse, keyboard and touch input in the LibGDX game engine.

Audio Programming. Sound Effects, Music and Recording

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

This video tutorial looks at handling mouse, keyboard and touch input in the LibGDX game engine.

Cameras and Viewports. Dealing with multiple resolutions and aspect ratios

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

This video tutorial looks at handling multiple devices with different resolutions and aspect ratios in LibGDX using cameras and viewports. We cover the different camera types available, using one to render a scene using game specific coordiantes, then using Viewports to render the best results on the device regardless to aspect ratio.

Gestures. Tapping, panning, zoom, pinching and more

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

This video tutorial looks at handling multi touch gestures on mobile devices.  This includes the standard pitch to zoom, pinch to rotate, tapping, panning and more.  It also looks at handling multiple input handlers at once.

Creating and using Spritesheets with TextureAtlas

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this video tutorial we look at the process of creating and using a sprite sheet, both process and with code using a TextureAtlas and TextureRegion. We also take a brief look at using CodeAndWeb's TexturePacker application for those that prefer a GUI.

Introduction to Stage2D

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial, the first of a series, we look at using the Scene2D game library built over top of LibGDX. It's an overview of how Scene2D is used and the basics of creating a Scene2D game.

Stage2D - Actors and Actions

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial, the second of a series, we look at using using Actors and Actions with Scene2D.

Stage2D - Grouping and Hit Tests

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial, the third of a series, we learn how to organize actors into groups. We also learn how to do hit tests on actors, enabling you to select them via touch or mouse.

Stage2D - UI, Widgets, Layout and Skins

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial, the fourth and final of the Scene2D series, we look at using Scene2D to create a UI. This includes using a widget, creating a skin, laying out controls in a table and more. We also look at mixing Scene2D and normal SpriteBatch together, including dealing with multiple input processors.

Sprite Animation

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial we look at the process of Sprite animation.  We look at two methods of providing sprites for the Animation class, one creating them from an existing texture, the other by loading a texture atlas.

3D Part 1

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial we start looking at 3D support in LibGDX. We set up a 3D world, create a simple cube and create a camera, finally showing how to render it all.

3D Part 2: Loading Models and Playing Animations

Click here to watch in YouTube Blog Post with Source

In this tutorial we continue to explore working in 3D with LibGDX. This time we look at the process of importing a 3D model using fbx-conv, then write the code to display that model, with animations and all.





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Unity Announce Support for New Nintendo 3DS
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29. January 2016

 

Title pretty much says it all.  Unity just announced device support for the New Nintendo 3DS (that is actually the name, called the 3DS LL in Japan).  In case you are wondering, yes Unity already supported the 3DS as a platform, this announcement is specifically about the new model.  It appears to be a version of Unity 5.1 at this point and interestingly, this release ships with only IL2CPP, so there is no Mono runtime.  This should result in greater speeds, but may have a few unseen consequences.  You still need to be registered in Nintendo’s Developer program to gain access.

 

Excerpt from the announcement:

We announced our intention to support Nintendo’s recently released New Nintendo 3DS platform at Unite Tokyo and we’ve been very busy in the meantime getting it ready.  Now we’re pleased to announce it’s available for use today!

The first question people usually ask is “do you support the original Nintendo 3DS too?”  To which the answer is a qualified “yes”. We can generate ROM images which are compatible with the original Nintendo 3DS, and there are certainly some types of game which will run perfectly well on it, but for the majority of games we strongly recommend targeting the New Nintendo 3DS for maximum gorgeousness.

We’ve been working very closely with select developers to port a few of their existing games to New Nintendo 3DS. We’ve been busy profiling, optimizing, and ironing out the niggles using real-world projects, so you can be confident your games will run as smoothly as possible. In fact, one game has already successfully passed through Nintendo’s exacting mastering system; Wind Up Knight 2 went on sale at the end of last year!

Unity’s internal shader code underwent a number of significantchanges in the transition from version 5.1 to 5.2.  This brought many benefits, including cleaner and more performant code, and also fixed a number of issues we had on console platforms.  We’re not able retrofit those fixes to the 5.1 based version, so we shall only be actively developing our shader support from version 5.2 onwards.

We’ve been putting Unity for New Nintendo 3DS version 5.2 through its paces for a few months, and it’ll be made available once it’s proved itself by getting a game through Nintendo’s mastering system too.  That should be in the near future, but it’s not something that’s easy to put a date on.

So far, we’ve been in development with a Nintendo 3DS-specific version of the Unity editor, but now we’ve switched our focus towards upgrading to the latest version, with a view to shipping as a plug-in extension to the regular editor.  We have a 5.3 based version running internally, and we’re working hard to get it merged into our mainline code-base.

It should be mentioned that some features are not yet implemented in this first public release, notably UNet and Shadow Maps (although Light-Maps are supported). We’re prioritising new features according to customer demand, but right now our main goal is to get into the regular editor.

In common with other mobile platforms, there are some limitations as to what can be achieved with the hardware. For instance, Unity’s Standard Shader requires desktop-class graphics hardware so it’s not something we can support on Nintendo 3DS. However, as with other platforms, if you try to use a shader which is unsupported then Unity will fall-back to a less complex shader that gives the best possible results.

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