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15. November 2015

 

We already have motion controls, audio control and of course tactile control, what about controlling a game with your emotions?  It sounds far fetched but it really isn’t, in fact it’s here today.  Just about every single modern gaming device has a front facing camera available in some form or another.  Well, Microsoft Research lab Microsoft Project Oxford just announced the release of the emotion tool which enables you to detect emotions on a persons face.

 

Basically you send it a picture and it returns the probability of various emotions.  For example, I sent it this image here and it returned the following results:

image

 

Basically you feed it an image in URL form and optionally a rectangle selecting the face, and it returns a JSON result with the probability of each emotion.  In this case Microsoft determine with 99.99% likelihood that this baby is sad, with a 0.001% chance that it’s angry instead.  I fed it a handful of pictures and it did a remarkably accurate job.

 

You can use it as a REST API now ( or just play with the playground ) right here.  Otherwise the SDK can be downloaded here.

 

So the tech is actually here already and works pretty well.  The question remains… would gamers embrace having a camera constantly scanning their emotions?  I actually can think of a few genres or tools where they might.  How many “you mad bro?” apps can we expect to flood the market now? If nothing else, it’s a fun tool to play around with on a Sunday afternoon!

Programming, Totally Off Topic

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Torque 2D 3.2 Released
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30. December 2015

 

GarageGames have just released Torque2D version 3.2.  Torque2D is 2D game engine built over the Torque 3D engine, which is now open source and MIT licensed.

From the release:

While you were singing carols door to door and sipping eggnog by the fireplace, the T2D Steering Committee was hard at work wrapping up one last present! Presenting Torque2D 3.2! This latest incarnation of everybody's favorite 2D engine sports several shiny new features! But before we get into that, let's take a moment of silence to remember the many bugs that lost their lives to make this release possible.


Now then, our first new feature is the FadeTo function. This works like MoveTo except that it changes the blend color over time instead of the position. If you ever wanted to fade a bad guy out when it died or fade a slightly transparent object in, then this function was written for you! It could be used to make your hero flash red when his life is low or slowly change the color of the sky as the sunsets. FadeTo comes with all the support functions of MoveTo including a cancel function and callback when it's finished.


We also added GrowTo which changes the size of an object over time. With GrowTo you can change the x and y at different rates and create all kinds of neat effects. But, there's a catch! Collision shapes don't grow with the sprite. So if your object has collision shapes attached you'll want to use it sparingly. Slight changes can do a lot. Like FadeTo, GrowTo is supported by functions to test and cancel. When an object reaches its target size it will fire a callback.
We also have support now for one way collisions. This is most commonly seen in platformer games when a character jumps up through the platform and magically lands on top of it, but in theory there's many other uses for it. This only works for edge and chain collision shapes.
And finally, last but not least, we have revived ogg! That's right! The open source, compact audio format is back by popular demand. You can start using ogg files again on Windows and Mac OSX.

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