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5. July 2019


YoyoGames have just released GameMaker 2.2.3.  If you have the Mobile version of GMS, you can now target the tvOS platform.  The release also contains a number of new features including DND (drag and drop) programming support for comments, several fixes and more.

Summary of the 2.2.3 release:

2.2.3 introduces tvOS as a new export target if you have the Mobile licence, the ability to add comments to your DnD projects (and lots of other DnD fixes), the option to turn off the file system sandboxing on Desktop platform, support for exporting asset packages locally so you can share with your team more easily, and better communication of when your licences are to expire. Plus, this release has a whole bunch of major stability fixes to stop startup crashes and various other issues whilst using the Windows IDE, and issues with keychain certificate trust settings and building for Ubuntu on the Mac IDE.

We have also changed the way we handle startup crash messages on Windows, so that now (should you even see issues after all the fixes in this release...) it's a one-click report submission tool which automatically gets all the info we require for us to fix your issue and sends it directly to us without you having to file a Helpdesk ticket.

Be sure to check the full release notes available here for in-depth details of this release.  If you want to learn more about GameMaker Studio 2, be sure to check out our Closer Look available here or watch the video available here and embedded below.

GameDev News


24. June 2019


There is a sale on Humble containing several applications of interest to game developers.  The sale started today, June 24th and runs for 7 days.  The following is a list of applications most interesting to game developers, as well as links to any prior coverage we have done on that topic if it’s available.

The links above contain affiliate tags, meaning any purchase helps GFS.  All software will give you a Steam key.  Keep in mind the Steam Summer Sale is coming soon, stay tuned as we will profile game development software featured in that sale once launched.

GameDev News


21. June 2019


After almost a year of silence, WaveEngine 3.0 preview has just been released.  WaveEngine is a cross platform C# powered ECS based 3D game engine that is completely free to use.  Sporting a new renderer and a sporting a completely new editor, WaveEngine 3.0 preview is still quite an early release.  We did a hands-on Closer Look review at a previous version of WaveEngine 3.0 for a good basis in how WaveEngine programming works.

Highlight details of the 3.0 preview release:

  • New launcher and update system
  • New WaveEditor
    • Effects Viewer
    • Materials Viewer
    • Render Layer Viewer
    • Sampler Viewer
    • Textures Viewer
    • Model Viewer
    • Audio Viewer
    • Scene Viewer
  • New Effect Editor
  • XR Ready
  • Single Pass (Instanced) Stereo Rendering
  • New extensible Render Pipeline
  • New life cycle for entities
  • New web project support
  • New serialization system based on YAML
  • New HoloLens 2.0 support

You can learn more and download the 3.0 preview release right here.  Keep in mind WaveEngine 3.0 is nowhere near ready for production use, with only a limited subset of platforms and features available.  Check out WaveEngine in action in the video below.

GameDev News


19. June 2019


Amazon have just released beta 1.19 of their game engine Lumberyard.  Sharing a common code base with CryEngine, CryTek and Amazon have taken their game engines in very different directions the last few years.  Lumberyard is free to use, so long as you host your own multiplayer services or use Amazon technologies.

The 1.19 release brings over 150 improvements, but there are two highlight features:

  • New Dynamic Vegetation System. Procedurally generate a diverse and detailed biome in minutes instead of manually placing and painting in vegetation. Lumberyard’s new vegetation components support a wide range of artistic expressions and fine-grained control over the scale, density, and distribution in your biomes. You can also improve runtime performance by configuring segments of vegetation to be placed or removed at runtime based on player location and gameplay events.
  • Major updates to Script Canvas. Create even more dynamic behaviors and gameplay without having to code or rely on expert engineers. We’ve made major improvements to Script Canvas, introducing support for containers such as arrays and maps, new Script Events that enable you to send events between graphs and scripts, and new graph validation and debugger features so you can find, diagnose, and fix invalid graphs more quickly. We’ve also made workflow improvements to make it even easier add, configure, and organize nodes in your graphs.

View the full release notes for complete details of this release.  Check out the video below to see the new vegetation system and script canvas improvements in action.  Lumberyard is available for download here, be aware however if you zoom the web page in, the download link goes away…  not the best UX there.

GameDev News


17. June 2019


The nCine Engine is a C++ powered, open source MIT licensed 2D game engine that has been under development for over 7 years.  It is a lower level code based framework, although it does support Lua scripting out of the box.  The engine also integrates the ImGui framework making creating tools and UIs a breeze.  The nCine engine works on Windows, Linux, Mac and Android.

Highlighted features include:

  • ImGui debug overlay and profilers
  • Lua integration for scripting
  • OPenGL 3.3/OpenGL ES 3.0
  • Spritesheet based animated sprites
  • Scengraph based transformations
  • Particle simulation with affectors
  • Sound and music playback
  • Text rendering with kerning
  • Support for multiple texture formats
  • Profiler graphs and statistics
  • Works on multiple platforms
  • Template containers and algorithms
  • Fully C++11 compliant codebase
  • High precision monotonic timers
  • Atomic counters
  • Thread pool creation, synchronization and affinity assignment
  • Basic math lbrary for vectors, 4x4 matrices and quaternions
  • Logging system with multiple levels and console or file output
  • GLFW 3 or SDL 2 for window and input on PC
  • Joystick support with hot swap and gamepad mappings
  • Android assets support
  • Google Test based unit tests with coverage checked with Gcovr
  • Microbenchmarked with the Google Benchmark support library
  • Doxygen based documentation with Graphviz class diagrams
  • Periodically checked with Cppcheck and Valgrind
  • Periodically linted with clang-format (previously with Artistic Style and Uncrustify)
  • Instrumentation for the Tracy frame profiler

With so many game engines on the market, you may be wondering… why another one?  Well the author explains exactly that right here.  The cCine project is hosted on GitHub and provides a Pong demo to get you started, implemented in both C++ and Lua.

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