Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon

8. February 2012

 

 

As I mentioned in my earlier review, all the links for Hexagon’s documentation are currently broken.  Since then, I have noticed a fair bit of search engine traffic  of people looking for documentation, for good reason too… this program is downright confusing!

 

I have noticed that although all of the links to Daz3D.com are broken and you can’t use the help menu in Hexagon itself, the help files are actually installed on your computer!  Go to the folder you installed Hexagon 2.5 to, in my case it was C:\Program Files (x86)\DAZ 3D\Hexagon2\docs.  Inside should be the PDFs you are looking for.

 

In case you cannot find them, I will make them available here ( hopefully this is ok… ).

 

Keep in mind, these are the manuals for Hexagon 2.1 and appear to be about 6 years old!  That said, it’s better than nothing!

 

 

Hexagon 2.1 US Manual (PDF, 11MB)

Hexagon 2.1 US Keyboard Shortcuts (PDF 1/3MB)

Art

6. February 2012

 

 

As I recently mentioned Daz3D have made Hexagon, Bryce and Daz Studio all available for free for a limited time.  As a Blender user, until they finally ship BMesh, I am always in the market for a good modeler with effective COLLADA support.  So at a price of 0$ I figured I would try out Hexagon 2.5.  This is not a complete review, not even close, think of this more as a “These are the things I ran into that made me decide to not waste any more time on Hexagon” review.  Obviously, it doesn’t have a happy ending, which is a shame.

 

 

First off, it is a remarkably capable modeler, almost every feature you could want is in there… somewhere.  Feature-wise, it actually spanks Blender handily, with support for n-gons, good boolean supports, surfacing, etc.

 

First a look at the interface:

 

image

 

At first glance it’s pretty clean.  Properties and scene graph on the right, a tool shelf ALA Maya across the top and a mish mash of visibility buttons across the bottom across the bottom.  Then this is where things start to show the sloppiness as well.  Consider this expanded icon:

 

image

As you can see from the tool tip, this control “Activates actual lighting” and when you click it, that toolbar folds out.

 

 

Any guesses what any of these icons means?  Cause, I’ll tell you, I don’t have a bloody clue either!  None of them have mouse over tool tips, so you are stuck trying to figure it out from the icons…  good luck with that.

 

Don’t worry, there is always the help files to sort things out…   or wait, is there?

 

 

Here comes big and I mean BIG strike number two.  The help, yeah, there is none!



Of course, there is a Help menu, and as you can see, the options look pretty encouraging imageover all but they do nothing!


You click Help->Documentation or Help->Tutorial and you are brought to Daz3D’s website.  At first it appears that it is going to bring you to a documentation page, but then you are redirected back to the Front page.  Yay.


Alright, so the help hyperlink is broken, no big deal right, just surf to the help manually in your browser?


Ah good idea, let’s try that!

So you go to Support->Wiki from the front page manual.  Then select Hexagon on the left hand side and click the Hexagon documentation link.

image

 

 

 

Ooooh, this looks encouraging!  Hexagon 2.1 Manual in English, it’s an earlier version but better than nothing, lets click that!

 

image

 

 

Oh my!  Amateur hour continues.  So, no help, I guess you are on your own figuring things out and, well…  good luck with that.  The interface is downright confusing.

 

Take view navigation for example.  Other than Blender, the 3D world has become pretty standardized on how to navigate in 3D, so lets see how it works in Hexagon.  To pan your view, hold down your middle mouse button.  Ok so far.  To zoom in your view, use the scroll wheel.  Ok, pretty standard.  To Dolly/Rotate your view you….

 

Um….

 

You…  well apparently you use the arrow keys.  Yep, by default there is no mouse mode to actually orbit the camera!   Of course, there might be, put to hell if I can find it with a complete lack of documentation!   Of course, a little googling later and I discovered the answer… It’s a preference and it’s by default OFF! Huh?  Why?  Seriously, why?

 

For those following along at home, its pretty easy to resolve. Go to the Edit Menu->Preference Editor.  Under the User Interface tab, click Misc then select Dolly around selection center, like so:

 

image

 

 

Can you seriously tell me a reason why this wouldn’t be enabled by default?  It’s a small thing, but it is infuriating until fixed.  It’s a problem that exists for no reason, and those are always the worst kinds of problems.

 

 

There are a few thousand examples like this, all around, it’s like death from a thousand paper cuts.  Like features are added or removed with no thought to being a cohesive tool.  Lets take a look at the tools panel for an example:

 

image

 

Second Life???  HUH?  Why exactly is Second Life getting such important placement, or even placement at all?  Now *this* is the type of thing you make optional in the Preference Editor!  Now take another look back at the shelf and answer me this… where you do think you would go to say… split an edge?  If you said anything except Vertex modeling, you are wrong.  Now lets take a look at that process…  How do you split an edge?  Using a tool named Tessellate, that expands down with various options, lets take a look at that next!

 

image

Lovely eh?

 

So, not only do you not have documentation, you also do not have tooltips so its basically anyone’s guess which icon you actually want to press.

 

But wait, there is a description of each icon below the shelf!  Oh wait… the expanded toolbar obscures the description text!

 

 

 

 

Again, a small niggling thing, but 5 minutes in QA should have caught this.  Again, it’s like people keep adding features with no thought to how they fit or should work.  Even worse, you have items that simply don’t exist in the panel, but only via menu.  For example, there is a utilities panel, and a tools->Utilities menu, but WELD can only be accessed via the menu! Or how about the “Lines” menu that has 5! items called arc!  I’m not kidding… look:

 

image 

 

 

Then there is the lack of polish that if you switch to a different part of the tools panel with a menu expanded, it doesn’t close.  You have to switch back to Vertex modeling, click Free Tessellate again to get rid of the menu, otherwise it’s stuck there forever. There are tons of little things like that with the UI, that make the UI toolkit they used just feel… sloppy and frankly, slow.

 

 

Speaking of slow, I am running Hexagon on a 12GB i7 machine purchased 3 weeks ago and it can be downright sluggish.  This is especially true when it comes to sub-division surfaces.  The finally

 

 

 

It’s all such a shame, as reality is, there is a great program underneath the surface here.  I didn’t give this program a lot of time; I didn’t have to.  The glaring problems are exactly that, glaring.  I encountered a good dozen “WTFs?” in less than half an hour and within three or four hours with this program I realized it had nothing to offer me that Blender/Wings didn’t already do better.

 

 

If there was documentation available ( a big huge mistake, especially when they new they were going to have a giant influx of new users with the promotion ), it might be worth fighting through the stupidity, but there isn’t and it’s not really worth it in the end.

 

 

Product Link: Hexagon 2.5

 

It’s free for the remainder of February, so there is no need to take my word for it, check it out yourself.  Be aware though, once you sign up, Daz is a little spam happy.  Since signing up this weekend, I believe I have received 5 emails, in addition to the receipt and serial number emails you get initially.  A word of advice to Daz, first off, it’s really cool you have made your applications available freely and I hope you see an uptick in your market sales as a result; but dial it back on the volume of emails or you are going to be blocked as SPAM and ignored by the users you are trying to attract!

Art

2. February 2012

 

 

 

Not sure the catch, if there is one, but this is a pretty epic deal on face value, hard to beat free!  I just finished the checkout process and as you can see, it really is free:

 

Your order contains:

DAZ Studio 4 Pro                                 1 @ $429.95   = $429.95
Bryce 7 Pro                                      1 @ $249.95   = $249.95
Hexagon 2.5 - Download...      Hexagon - Bo... 1 @ $149.95   = $149.95
Tax:                                                           $0.00
Shipping:                                                      $0.00
Discount:                                                     -$829.85
Paid via Gift Cert/Voucher/other credit:                      ($0.00)
Total:                                                         $0.00

=========================================================================

 

You have to sign up, and they will confirm your email address, so use a real one.

 

Oh, and their servers are getting absolutely hammered right now, so have some patience.  For those wondering, these are real applications and those are their real prices, so this is quite a bargain and time limited to my understanding.

 

As to the applications:

 

Daz Studio Pro

 

 

DAZ Studio 4 Logo

DAZ Studio is a feature rich 3D figure customization, posing, and animation tool that enables anyone to create stunning digital illustrations and animations. DAZ Studio is the perfect tool to design unique digital art and animations using virtual people, animals, props, vehicles, accessories, environments and more. Simply select your subject and/or setting, arrange accessories, setup lighting, and begin creating beautiful artwork.

With DAZ Studio 4 you can...
  • Create custom 3D characters and avatars
  • Produce illustrations for books, comics, and graphic novels
  • Make your own CG movies
  • Quickly make your own editorial artwork
  • Create graphic design elements
  • Design virtual environments with animated fly-throughs

 

 

So, basically it sounds like Poser, not sure how much this one use would be but worth checking out for free. 

 

 

Bryce 7

 

 

Bryce 7: The First Name in 3D Landscapes

Discover why Bryce has earned its place as the favorite 3D modeling and animation package of so many for so long. Bryce 7 Pro combines powerful features with a smart and simple user interface to make the creation of digital landscapes easier and more realistic than ever. Bryce 7 Pro proves that the only limit to creation is your own imagination.

 

 

 

Bryce I’ve used in the past, it used to be a rather one of a kind package, although now it’s functionality is often included in game engines like UDK.  Anyways, it allows you to easily build and render landscapes and terrain easily.  The results are actually rather amazing too.  This is surely a tool to add to your arsenal, especially for free!  The Pro version exports to Callada, so can easily be slotted into your workflow.

 

 

Hexagon 2

 

 

Hexagon delivers all the tools a graphic artist needs to create detailed 3D models ready for final render. Packed with features such as; DAZ Studio Bridge, sculpted primitives, freehand modeling brushes, micro-displacement modeling tools, comprehensive UV-mapping modules, advanced 3D paint, and instant ambient occlusion. Hexagon provides you with all the options of expensive competitor software, but at an affordable price.

 

 

 

Basically it’s a modeling package, I have absolutely no experience with this application, but again the price is right.

 

 

Oh, and your “purchase” gives you Mac and PC binaries!

 

 

 

In a world of 3000+$ graphic apps, this is an offer too good to ignore!  So, go check it out before it expires!

Art

31. January 2012

 

 

As I mentioned earlier, I have recently discovered Node.JS.  Quick version, Node is a server side Javascript engine, allowing you to easily create applications on the server.  Obviously you could use SFML on both the client and the server but many people find Javascript a much faster language to work with.  The libraries bundled with Node make this task extremely easy.

 

We are going to create a very simple “High score” system, allowing users to push their score to the server as well as get a list of the current high scores.

 

 

 

You may notice Node referred to as Node, Node.js and NodeJS, which is correct?  Beats the hell out of me!  I frankly just use them all, so if you notice me switching terms, remember they are all referring to the same thing.  I am assuming you are using Windows 7 and Visual Studio for this tutorial, but there are no reasons you can’t use different OSes or IDEs.

 

 

First off, lets get Node installed, which you can download here.  Run the installer and node will be installed to your machine.  Really that’s about it.  Optionally you can add the install directory to your PATH environment variable, in my case it was C:\Program Files(X86)\nodejs, this will save you a ton of key strokes later and for the following instructions I will assume you have performed this step.

 

 

Now that you have installed node, we can create our server; you are about to see how laughably easy this is using Node.  Create a file server.js in your editor of choice, in my case I am using JetBrain WebStorm ( on a 30 day trial ) and have been impressed so far, but you can use any text editor including Notepad.  In server.js add the following code:

 

var dgram = require('dgram'); var server = dgram.createSocket('udp4'); console.log("Socket created\n"); server.on("message",function (msg,rinfo) { console.log("Received message"+ msg.toString()); }); server.bind(9000);

 

 

And… that’s it.  A perfectly functioning UDP server, not that it does much yet.  To run the code, in a command prompt, change to the directory you saved server.js to and simply type “node server.js”.  To stop node from running, press CTRL + C twice.

 

dgram is a built in Node library for creating datagram sockets.  When we create the socket with tell it to use udp4, that is to say UDP connection for IP v 4.  Then we add an on “message” handler that for now simply echos whatever data it receives.

 

 

Now lets make a C++ client to talk to our server.  If you are unfamiliar with how to configure SFML, take a look at part 1 of my C++ with SFML tutorial.  In this case we aren’t going to need to link the graphics or audio libraries, which greatly cuts down the size of our project.  If you have trouble setting up a project or simply don’t want to, you can download a pre-configured project here.  Simply open the solution and run.

 

Once you have created and configured a new project, lets add our code.  In my case I created a file called Scoreboard.cpp and added the following code.

 

#include "SFML/Network.hpp" int main(int argc, char* argv[]) { if(argc <2) return-1; sf::IPAddress ip("127.0.0.1"); sf::SocketUDP socket; sf::Packet packet; packet.Append(argv[1],strlen(argv[1])); socket.Send(packet,ip,9000); return0; }

 

 

Extremely simple code again.  The app is simply going to send a string you specify on the command line over a UDP socket, so first we check to make sure you specified a string. Then you create the IP address that represents your server’s location.  In this case you are using 127.0.0.1 which is a special reserved IP address called a loopback, which basically means “this machine”.  In an actual production environment, you would use an external IP address or DNS entry like “gameserver.mydomain.com”.

 

Next we declare our Socket and  Packet.  Think of a Packet as the “stuff” we are sending across the wire.  Next we fill that picket with the string the user passed in on the command line.  The Socket represents the connection to the remote server.  When we say socket.Send() we are saying send packet, on ip IpAddress using port 9000.  Finally we simply exit.

 

You can now run this from the command line using ScoreBoard.exe “The text you want to send”  <—The quotes are critical, or it will end up looking like multiple parameters instead of a single string.  Additionally you could specify the string in your debug settings, then you can simply press F5 to run your code.  To set this value, right click your solution and select Properties, then on the left hand side choose “Command Arguments” and specify your string (quoted again ) there, like this:

 

image

 

 

Now your primitive client and server are up and running.  Start your server first.  Open a command prompt, CD to the directory you created server.js in and type “node server.js” ( no quotes ).   Note, if you didn’t set your PATH to include the path to nodejs, this wont work and instead you will have to fully resolve the path to node.  Now run your SFML application, either using F5 if you specified a Command Argument, or from the command line.

 

Now you should see:

 

image

 

 

Congratulations!  You just created a fully function client and server!  You may have noticed we actually received two socket connections there, an empty one, then our string.  What’s going on here?  Well, SFML sends Packets in two parts, the first contains only the size, the second contains the actually data.  Why?  Beats me.  Not really a big deal, as you will soon see.

 

 

Now, in the next part we will actually make them do something!

 

 

Click here to download the pre-configured Visual Studio project.

Click here to download Server.js.

 

 

Click for part 2

Programming ,

30. January 2012

 

 

 

Alright, this one has absolutely nothing to do with game development, not even remotely, just an upfront warning!

 

I post it here because I just spent the last several hours trying to figure this out and now that I solved it, I felt like sharing in case other people are trying to add a property or attribute to a BlogEngine.Net page.  It’s not hard, once you figure it out!  Anyways, this site is run on BlogEngine and I am rather happy with it.  I have another site I am working on, however I need much more static pages with searchable attributes.  This isn’t really something Blog Engine is designed to do out of the box.  You can of course add tags to blog posts, but that doesn’t really work well for non-chronological pages.

 

So, I added it to the page object itself.  In this case I am going to add a single new entity to the Page, Published Year.  First obviously you need the BlogEngine source code,  download the source release.  Extract the project then open BlogEngine.sln inside the BlogEngine folder in Visual Studio.

 

 

First, in BlogEngine.core, locate Page.cs.

Now add the following code:

 

/// <summary> /// Added by me to support published year /// </summary> private string publishedYear; /// <summary> /// Gets or sets a value indicating Published Year /// </summary> public string PublishedYear { get { return this.publishedYear; } set { base.SetValue("PublishedYear", value, ref this.publishedYear); } }

 

 

Now you need to add a GUI for it, so you can actually set the Published Year.

 

 

Open EditPage.aspx.  First lets add the html.  I put it so it will appear in the side area of the form, above keywords.  Locate the Keywords LI ( included below for reference ) and add the following method:

 

<li> <label class="lbl" for="<%=txtPublishedYear.ClientID %>">Published Year</label> <asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtPublishedYear" TextMode="SingleLine" /> </li> <li> <label class="lbl" for="<%=txtKeyword.ClientID %>"><%=Resources.labels.keywords %> </label> <asp:TextBox runat="server" ID="txtKeyword" TextMode="MultiLine" Rows="5" /> </li>

 

 

Also in EditPage.aspx locate the SavePage() javascript method, and change it as follows:

var publishedYear = $("[id$='txtPublishedYear']").val(); var dto = { "id": Querystring('id'), "content": content, "title": title, "description": description, "publishedYear": publishedYear, "keywords": keywords, "slug": slug, "isFrontPage": isFrontPage, "showInList": showInList, "isPublished": isPublished, "parent": parent };

 

Order IS important here.

 

 

Now open EditPage.aspx.cs. Locate the PindPage() method and add:

this.txtPublishedYear.Text = page.PublishedYear;

 

Now locate BtnSaveClick() and modify to look like:

page.Description = this.txtDescription.Text; page.Keywords = this.txtKeyword.Text; page.PublishedYear = this.txtPublishedYear.Text; if (this.cbFrontPage.Checked)

 

 

Finally open AjaxHelper.aspx.cs in the admin folder.  Locate the SavePage() method and make the following change:

public static JsonResponse SavePage( string id, string content, string title, string description, string publishedYear, string keywords, string slug, bool isFrontPage, bool showInList, bool isPublished, string parent)

Remember when I said order was important?  These parameters need to be in the same order as the dto object created earlier.  So make sure your publishedYear setting is in the same position in both.  Now scroll down a little further in the SavePage() method and make the following change:

 

page.Description = description; page.PublishedYear = publishedYear; page.Keywords = keywords;

 

And, you are now done.  Compile and run.  Now when you go into your Page admin um, page, it should look like this:

 

image

 

 

 

Yay!  May seem a small thing, but its incredibly useful for me, and hopefully will be helpful to some of you out there!

Totally Off Topic

Month List

Popular Comments

First draft of MonoGame book Cross Platform Game Development with MonoGame available to backers
Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon


Home > >

24. June 2015

 

The MonoGame tutorial series has been written from day one with the intention of being compiled into book format.  As a thank you to GameFromScratch.com Patreon backers WIP copies ( as well as finishedMonogamebook books ) are available for download.

 

 

This represent the first compilation of Cross Platform Game Development with MonoGame and contains all of the tutorial series to date:

  • An Introduction and Brief History of XNA and Mo
    noGame
  • Getting Started with MonoGame on Windows
  • Getting Started with MonoGame on MacOS
  • Creating an Application
  • Textures and SpriteBatch

 

These represent early drafts, so the formatting isn’t final, there needs to be a thorough proof reading, some images need to be regenerated and of course “book” items like a proper forward, table of contents and index all need to be generated.  These tasks will all have to wait for the book to be finished.

 

The book is currently available in the following formats:

  • PDF
  • epub
  • mobi

 

The books are available for download here. (Authentication required)

 

If there is an additional format you would like to see it compiled for, please let me know.  Currently the book weights in a 77 pages.  As new tutorials are added, new compilations will be released.

, ,

blog comments powered by Disqus

Month List

Popular Comments