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11. June 2018


Just finished adding another tutorial to the ongoing Godot 3 tutorial series, Sound Fx and Music.  This tutorial covers a ton of topics around audio:

  • Playing audio using AudioStreamPlayer
  • Positional audio using AudioStreamPlayer2D
  • Importing and loading audio files, WAV and Ogg
  • Using the Audio Bus
  • Creating special effects such as panning, reverb and chorus
  • Managing volume
  • Using sound with Area2D


The series homepage is available here.

Programming


6. June 2018


I have been talking a fair bit lately about the Armory3D engine, a newly free open source Blender hosted cross platform engine.  You can target several different platforms using Armory and the technology that makes this possible is Kha.  Today we are looking at Kha.  Kha is an open source cross platform Haxe powered low level framework providing functionality like 2D and 3D graphics, input handling, audio and more.  It does it in an extremely cross platform manner able to support a huge number of platforms.  Essentially it provides the low level functionality required to make a game, much like SDL or SFML.  It is also an important technology to learn if you intend to use the Armory game engine.


Today I take a closer look at this behind the scenes technology in this video.  We cover the features of Kha then go through the process of installing Kha and getting up and running.


Kha has a couple prequisites that you need to install before getting started.  You need to install the following two technologies before installing Kha:

Once installed, you have two easy options for getting started with Kha.  You can either use Kode Studio, a customized version of Visual Studio Code, or you can install the Kha Extension Pack to your existing Visual Studio Code install.  Now that you’re up and going with Kha you probably want some code to work with, which is available in this repository.  Finally once you start learning Kha, you will probably want to check the Kha documentation or the reference materials.


Programming


31. May 2018


Now that Armory3D is fully funded an installable version will be available for download any day now.  Armory is a game engine built using the Haxe programming language over the Kha framework that runs inside the open source graphics application Blender.  The timing of this release is ideal, as it was recently announced the Blender Game Engine is being removed from Blender.


Armory is a game engine I’ve been excited for for some time now.  You can learn more about Armory here, access the complete documentation here and download the source code here.  Additionally there are a series of examples available here with more complicated/complete templates available here.  Hopefully the full version will be available for download in the next few days.


I fully intend to do a tutorial series covering using the Armory game engine, which hopefully I will be launching soon.  However in the meantime I created this introduction to Armory which should illustrate to you why this engine has me as excited as it does.  Of course being built on top of Blender, you are also going to have a solid understanding of Blender to make used of Armory3D.  Thankfully, I’ve got you covered there with both a text based and video based Blender tutorial series to get you started.


Video Link

GameDev News Programming


29. May 2018


If you are a pixel artist, one of the most challenging tasks you have to deal with is handling multiple resolutions and aspect ratios that your game might run at.  Thankfully if you are using the newest (Unity 2018.2b3 or later) version of Unity there is now a new component that makes this job borderline trivial.

Announced in the following tweet:

image


You can download the component and a couple sample scenes here on Github, and you can read more about it here.

The 2D Pixel Perfect package contains the Pixel Perfect Camera component which ensures your pixel art remains crisp and clear at different resolutions, and stable in motion.


It is a single component that makes all the calculations needed to scale the viewport with resolution changes, removing the hassle from the user. The user can adjust the definition of the pixel art rendered within the camera viewport through the component settings, as well preview any changes immediately in Game view by using the Run in Edit Mode feature.

Using the camera is simple, once the package is installed, it’s simply added to a camera and configure:

image

Your game should now scale gracefully across resolutions and aspect ratios.  To see the Pixel Perfect Camera in action be sure to watch this video, also embedded below.

GameDev News Art Programming


28. May 2018


Last month we reported that Blender Game Engine (BGE) was being removed entirely from the source code of Blender for the upcoming major 2.8 release.  Judging by the comments section this was certainly a polarizing decision, with replies basically falling into two camps.  On one side there was a lot of “good riddance to bad rubbish” type replies, while in the other camp it was mostly “I’m done with Blender if this happens”.  Clearly the decision impact enough people that something had to be done.  Well, that something was just announced on Twitter:

image


The linked article from the developer mailing list:

Hi all,

The Blender Foundation Development Fund has reserved a number of bigger donations (also on donator's request) for game engine and interactive 3D related features.

Now 2.8 is getting shaped up, it was time to check on this topic. Yesterday afternoon I met with Benoit Bolsee and a couple of Code Quest participants, to discuss the future of Blender's real-time 3D needs and "interaction mode".

The outcome is that Benoit accepted a grant to work as designer and lead developer for one year on bringing back a good real-time interactive 3D system in Blender. He will do this part-time, in average 1.5 days per week, starting July 1st.

Obviously all work and further discussions will be done in public; using our regular channels (mailing lists, code.blender.org, developer.b.o, devtalk.b.o). Help from other Blender developers is very welcome. This will be further announced when Benoit starts.

To summarise, work will first be done in two areas;

- Implement a high quality real-time viewport with physics/event handling. This should result in a pleasant & usable environment to setup and bake simulations.

- Design and prototype a new nodal logic system.

Related to this work is also to enable good support (export or some kind of integration) for external game engines such as Godot, Armory, Blend4Web, Unreal, Unity, etc.

I especially invite the first three (open source) projects to connect with us to find ways to keep a high level of compatibility.

Work on typical GE features such as super-fast drawing (LOD, etc) are welcome too but should be part of the regular work on Blender's viewport and our internal drawing engines. That way everyone benefits. Laters,

-Ton-

Blender Game Engine is not coming back, but a great deal of the functionality that was removed with it will be returning. Additionally Blender will be working directly to support Blender as a game development tool for existing game engines.

Art GameDev News Programming


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