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26. May 2015

 

I will admit, the end results look a heck of a lot like the starting point, but behind the scenes it was pretty much a complete rewrite of all the underlying CSS and a good chunk of HTML changes.  Sorry for the delay in new tutorials, but the end is finally here.  I ended up keeping a very similar over all layout and colour scheme to the original site.  I had a darker theme temporarily, but it was harder to read and caused me to receive a fair number of less than happy emails… ;)

 

 

So what’s new here?

 

The most immediately obvious is the old interface has been stripped away.  Outdated menus to obsolete tutorials no longer clutter the site.  Behind the scenes, the HTML is optimized and the page should load better.  The biggest changes are highlighted below.

 

Responsive and Mobile Friendly site

 

This was the number one reason behind the rewrite.  Basically Google tied their search rankings to the mobile friendliness of a site.  I could (and did) turn on the mobile theme for the site as a temporary workaround, but having separate styles for different browsers was ugly.  The new site now scales better across a broad range of devices, from high resolution monitors to small mobile screens.

 

Here for example is the site running on my HTC One mobile phone.

GFS

 

The layout is such that an iPad in portrait mode will get the mobile site, while turning to landscape will get you the full UI.  Use the icon in the top right corner to bring down the site menu.

 

New Getting Started Page

 

A lot of people arrive here with no prior experience.  I have set up a new landing page to get them started with a series of simple questions.  I will be expanding upon and improving this area over time.

 

New Game Engines section

 

Over time I did “Closer Look at” guides for a number of game engines.  I have gathered them together into a single resource, and intend to start adding more guides for more popular engines very soon.  Thing of this as an ideal resource for getting started choosing between different game engines.

 

New Tutorials Page

 

This area is still very much a WIP.  Basically I have done a number of tutorials for a number of different  gamedev topic.  This page is going to bring them all together on one spot.  Once again, very much a work in progress.

 

image

 

Video Section

 

I’ve been producing more and more video tutorials, hosted on YouTube and linked from individual blog posts.  The video gallery is an attempt to bring all of these videos together in a single location.  Still very much a work in progress too.

image

 

Miscellaneous Small Changes

 

There were tons of small incremental changes… site actually has icons now, links to Digg removed, tags improved, font and colour changes, etc.  Most importantly though, Google is now happy and hopefully so are you all.

 

Hopefully you find the new site to be an over all more pleasant experience.  Some things are still in a WIP stage, but good enough IMHO that I can focus again on creating content while I slowly fix the rough edges.  There are bound to be a few bugs, so if you catch one, let me know.  Also, if you absolutely hate a change I’ve made, please also let me know!

News


22. May 2015

 

Following the Beta release a few weeks back, the Godot Engine team have just released Godot Engine 1.1.

 

The highlights of the release are:

  • Rewritten Auto-Completion in the Code-Editor. Supports a lot of scenarios and perform smart-completion of node types if a scene where the script is being used is open.
  • Visual Shader Editor (Edit shaders connecting nodes)
  • New API in OS for managing the screens and window, with multi-monitor support.
  • Largely rewritten 2D engine, with support for:
    • Shaders (Visual and Code)
    • 2D Materials
    • 2D Independent Z ordering per-node.
    • 2D Lights
    • 2D Shadows with Polygonal Occluders
    • 2D Normal Mapping
    • Back-Buffer compositing for shaders that read from screen (allows all sorts of post-processing effects).
    • Improved Isometric TileMap Support (proper Z ordering of tiles and children nodes).
    • Distance-Field font support.
  • New 2D Navigation Polygon support, for efficient 2D pathfinding. Navigation Polygons can be edited visually and combined, disabled, etc.
  • Improved Usability in 2D Physics API:
    • Area2D and RigidBody2D can receive input events
    • Area2D can detect overlap with another Area2D
  • New Dark Theme
  • Much Improved Blender Collada Exporter (BetterCollada).
  • Large amount of bug fixes and smaller improvements.

 

Full (enormous) changelog since 1.0 here.

 

They also put together a video showcasing the new features:

 

Of course, if you are interested in learning more GFS has an extensive Godot Tutorial Series to get you started.

News


10. May 2015

 

 

Just noticed this on Twitter and it proved to be an interesting read.  JetBrains, the makers of IntelliJ, CLion, ReSharper and more, havebook sponsored this free book from O’Reilly Press.  It’s a 74 page book that combines a history lesson, modern introduction and Modern C++ overview all into one.  It’s free and a good read, what’s not to like?

 

 

 

Here is the Table of Contents:

 

1. The Nature of the Beast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2. The Origin Story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3. The Beast Wakes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
4. The Beast Roars Back. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5. Digging Deep on Modern C++. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
6. The Future of C++. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Bibliography. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

 

 

 

The book is available as a free PDF download directly at this link.  No other actions are required, simply download and read.

 

Even if you are just bored and want a bit of a history lesson and look to the future of C++, this is a good read.  Of course, if you are actually a C++ developer, it will be much more useful.

News


10. May 2015

 

SFML, the Simple and Fast Media Library, just release version 2.3.  SFML is a cross platform C++ based mostly 2D based game library built over top of OpenGL.  Although getting a bit long in the tooth, GameFromScratch created an SFML C++ game dev tutorial series if you are interested in learning more.

 

As to release 2.3, here are the announced changes:

 

SFML 2.3

General
  • Examples only link against sfml-main in release mode (#610, #766)
  • Replaced unsigned int with std::size_t for array indices and sizes (#739)
  • Fixed some issues with the Doxygen documentation (#750)
  • Added support for EditorConfig (#751)
  • Hide success message for CMake in quiet mode (#753)
  • Improved documentation for statuses with sf::Ftp (#763)
  • Moved stb_image into the extlibs directory (#795)
  • Changed the SOVERSION to major.minor (#812)
  • Fixed warnings about switch-statements (#863)
  • Added missing includes in the general headers (#851)
  • [Android] Updated toolchain file and dependencies (#791)
  • [Linux] Fixed missing pthread dependency (#794)
  • [OS X] Relaxed CMake installation rules regarding framework dependencies (#767)

 

Window
Features

 

Bugfixes
  • Fixed glXSwapIntervalSGI being broken for some driver implementations (#727, #779)
  • Fixed simultaneous context operations causing crashes on some AMD hardware (#778, #779)
  • Fixed joystick identification (#809, #811)
  • [iOS] Fixed various issues including stencil bits, device orientation and retina support (#748)
  • [iOS] Fixed inconsistency between sf::Touch::getPosition and touch events (#875)
  • [Linux] Fixed Alt+F4 not getting triggered in window mode (#274)
  • [Linux] Fixed Unix joystick stuff (#838)
  • [OS X] Fixed typo in JoystickImpl.cpp to prevent a crash (#762, #765)
  • [OS X] Fixed an issue in InputImpl::getSFOpenGLViewFromSFMLWindow (#782, #792)

 

Graphics
Features
  • Replaced GLEW with loader generated by glLoadGen (#779)
  • Added a new constructor to sf::Color that takes an sf::Uint32 (#722)
  • Updated stb_image to v2.02 (#777)
  • Updated FreeType to v2.5.5 (#799, #804)
  • Added checks for software OpenGL (#870)

 

Bugfixes
  • Fixed GL_ARB_compatibility not being detected (#859)
  • Fixed pixel format selection (#862)
  • Bumped back the OpenGL version requirement to 1.1 (#858)

 

Audio
Features
  • Dropped libsndfile and started using Vorbis, FLAC and OGG directly (#604, #757)
  • Added a FLAC file to the sound example (#815)

 

Bugfixes
  • Fixed access violation error in the destructor of sf::AudioDevice (#30, #602)
  • [OS X] Fixed threading issue with sf::SoundStream and OpenAL (#541, #831)

 

Network
Bugfixes
  • Fixed sf::TcpSocket not handling partial sends properly (#749, #796)

News


29. April 2015

 

Well this one came somewhat out of the blue for me.  Microsoft just released a cross platform ( Windows, Mac, Linux ) code editor called Visual Studio Code.  It’s not a full blown (and bloated!) IDE like Visual Studio, more of a streamlined code focused editor like Sublime Text or Brackets.  It is of course a preview release, so expect issues. 

 

In Microsoft’s own words:

 

Why Visual Studio Code?

Visual Studio Code provides developers with a new choice of developer tool that combines the simplicity and streamlined experience of a code editor with the best of what developers need for their core code-edit-debug cycle. Visual Studio Code is the first code editor, and first cross-platform development tool - supporting OSX, Linux, and Windows - in the Visual Studio family.

 

Visual Studio Code run's on Max OSX, Linux and Windows

 

At its heart, Visual Studio Code features a powerful, fast code editor great for day-to-day use. The Preview release of Code already has many of the features developers need in a code and text editor, including navigation, keyboard support with customizable bindings, syntax highlighting, bracket matching, auto indentation, and snippets, with support for dozens of languages.

 

For serious coding, developers often need to work with code as more than just text. Visual Studio Code includes built-in support for always-on IntelliSense code completion, richer semantic code understanding and navigation, and code refactoring. In the Preview, Code includes enriched built-in support for ASP.NET 5 development with C#, and Node.js development with TypeScript and JavaScript, powered by the same underlying technologies that drive Visual Studio. Code includes great tooling for web technologies such as HTML, CSS, LESS, SASS, and JSON. Code also integrates with package managers and repositories, and builds and other common tasks to make everyday workflows faster. And Code understands Git, and delivers great Git workflows and source diffs integrated with the editor.

 

But developers don't spend all their time just writing code: they go back and forth between coding and debugging. Debugging is the most popular feature in Visual Studio, and often the one feature from an IDE that developers want in a leaner coding experience. Visual Studio Code includes a streamlined, integrated debugging experience, with support for Node.js debugging in the Preview, and more to come later.

 

Architecturally, Visual Studio Code combines the best of web, native, and language-specific technologies. Using the GitHub Electron Shell, Code combines web technologies such as JavaScript and Node.js with the speed and flexibility of native apps. Code uses a newer, faster version of the same industrial-strength HTML-based editor that has powered the “Monaco” cloud editor, Internet Explorer's F12 Tools, and other projects. And Code uses a tools service architecture that enables it to use many of the same technologies that power Visual Studio, including Roslyn for .NET, TypeScript, the Visual Studio debugging engine, and more. In future previews, as we continue to evolve and refine this architecture, Visual Studio Code will include a public extensibility model that lets developers build and use plug-ins, and richly customize their edit-build-debug experience.

 

We are, of course, still very early with Visual Studio Code. If you prefer a code editor-centric development tool, or are building cross-platform web and cloud applications, we invite you to try out the Visual Studio Code Preview, and let us know what you think!

 

I’ll be sure to check it out and get back to your with my opinion.  Cross platform tools are always nice.  This new Microsoft…  wow they impress me with some of their moves.

News


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