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11. June 2020


DragonRuby is a game development framework powered by the Ruby programming language.  It is lightweight and crossplatform with an easy to learn API.  It is regularly $47USD, however it is currently included in the Bundle For Racial Justice currently running on Itch.io, along with hundreds of games for just $5.

Key features of DragonRuby include:

  • Dirt simple apis capable of creating complex 2D games.
  • Fast as hell. Powered by highly optimized C code written by Ryan C. Gordon, the creator of SDL (a library that powers every commercial game engine in the world).
  • Battle tested by Amir Rajan, a critically acclaimed indie game dev.
  • Tiny. Like really tiny. The entire engine is a few megabytes.
  • Hot loaded, realtime coding, optimized to provide constant feedback to the dev. Productive and an absolute joy to use.
  • Turn key builds for Windows, MacOS, and Linux with seamless publishing to Itch.io.
  • Cross platform: PC, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, Nintendo Switch, XBOX One, and PS4 (mobile and console compilation requires a business entity, NDA verification, and a Professional GTK License, contact us).

You can learn more about DragonRuby in the video below.

GameDev News Programming


10. June 2020


Pixologic have just released a new free version of their ZBrush sculpting application, ZBrushCore Mini.  Details of the software from the homepage:

ZBrushCoreMini is all about sculpting. Start with a simple sphere or a stone block, then use a select group of the most popular digital sculpting brushes from ZBrush to add or remove material and simply... create! ZBrushCoreMini frees you to explore your imagination.

Once you are happy with your creation, it also provides an exciting new way to share your work with others, through the iMage3D format. On any website, this will simply appear as a regular 2D image. But other users of ZBrushCoreMini can open the file in full 3D!

And with 3D printers increasingly coming into their own, ZBrushCoreMini includes the ability to export your model for real-world printing.

Interestingly however, nowhere do they mention the major limitation of the Mini version, not even on the version comparison page.  From the EULA:

       2.5 ZBrushCoreMini 

ZBrushCoreMini is intended for educational purposes. It may not be used for commercial, professional and other for-profit purposes. 

This non-commercial license will greatly limit what you can use ZBrushCore Mini for and is something you should be made aware of immediately.  You can learn more about ZBrushCore Mini and see it in action in the video below.

Art GameDev News


10. June 2020


Blender 2.83 was released last week and one of the new features is tentative support for Virtual Reality headsets in the form of Scene Inspection:

Scene inspection refers to the ability to inspect the scene in VR, without interacting with content. Essentially this means head-mounted display (HMD) support as well as some simple settings (controllable from outside the VR view) to control the experience.

Examples of supported use cases:

  • VR as a way for directors or clients to inspect scenes and give feedback to artists.
  • Pre-visualization for artists working on VR games.
  • Samsung GearVR/Google Cardboard movie making and app development.

Blender VR support is via OpenXR, which unfortunately isn’t currently supported by HTC or Steam VR headsets.  Details about supported headsets are available here.  Check out the new Blender VR functionality in action in the video below.

Art GameDev News


9. June 2020


Currently trending on Hacker News, Gravity is an open source programming language that is designed to be embedded in iOS and Android applications.  Released under the MIT license, Gravity is entirely C99 code with the single dependency being the C Standard Library, making Gravity incredible portable.  It is also extremely light weight while still being feature rich, with a syntax inspired by the Swift programming language.

Details from the Gravity website:

Gravity is a powerful, dynamically typed, lightweight, embeddable programming language written in C without any external dependencies (except for stdlib). It is a class-based concurrent scripting language with a modern Swift like syntax.

Gravity supports procedural programming, object-oriented programming, functional programming and data-driven programming. Thanks to special built-in methods, it can also be used as a prototype-based programming language.

Gravity has been developed from scratch for the Creo project in order to offer an easy way to write portable code for the iOS and Android platforms. It is written in portable C code that can be compiled on any platform using a C99 compiler. The VM code is about 4K lines long, the multipass compiler code is about 7K lines and the shared code is about 3K lines long. The compiler and virtual machine combined, add less than 200KB to the executable on a 64 bit system.

The source code for Gravity is available here, with various editor syntax support available for download here.  Gravity was ultimately created to be the scripting language behind the Creo IDE for iOS and Mac development.  You can learn more about Gravity in the video below.

GameDev News Programming


9. June 2020


Unity have just released Unity 2019.4 LTS, or Long Term Support.  This is a version of Unity that is only going to receive bug and security fixes going forward, making it the most stable and ideal version of Unity to start new Unity projects on.

Details on the 2019 LTS release from the Unity blog:

As part of our commitment to improving the development process for users, Unity is now shifting to offering LTS as the default version of the platform, and we have committed to doing fewer releases per year. You have been incredible in helping us understand your needs and we’re grateful for your feedback. In response to this we have improved, and will continue to improve, workflows and modernize Unity to be more flexible, focusing on delivering stability and interoperability of features.

Beginning today with the release of 2019 LTS, the LTS versions of Unity will become the default available for download from the Unity Hub. Moving forward, Unity will issue up to two TECH stream releases per year followed by the annual LTS release. The TECH Stream is for creators who demand to be on the cutting edge as technologies and workflows are evolving, while LTS is suggested for creators aiming to ship their projects in the near future, or for those who have everything they need in 2019 LTS. This shift in release philosophy will ensure that you are installing the most stable version for projects in production.

What’s in the 2019 LTS?

The new Long-Term Support (LTS) version of Unity contains everything from the previous three TECH stream releases with all the fixes and improvements we added to Unity 2019.3.0 since it was released. Similar to our previous LTS releases the focus for 2019 LTS isn’t new features, API changes or enhancements, but defect rectification and usability upgrades aimed at improving the stability of the product. In short, it’s a continuation of the 2019 TECH stream without new features which is why we also call it Unity 2019.4.0.

You can download Unity 2019.4 LTS in the Unity Hub or on the LTS support page here.  Learn more about Unity 2019.4LTS in the video below.

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