Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
30. May 2019


In 2017 Adobe announced the End Of Life for the Flash browser plugin was coming at the end of 2020.  Flash developers still had the ability to deploy their applications to desktops and mobile devices using Adobe AIR technology.  Today, Adobe announced the EOL for that platform as well.

As of June 2019, Adobe is transitioning ongoing platform support and feature development of AIR to HARMAN. This will coincide with an Adobe-issued update of AIR, v32, for supported mobile and desktop platforms. HARMAN has a long-standing history as an Adobe AIR partner, maintains knowledge of the platform and ecosystem, and is well-positioned to support AIR developers moving forward.

HARMAN (a wholly‐owned subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.) designs and engineers connected products and solutions for automakers, consumers, and enterprises worldwide. HARMAN’s software services power billions of mobile devices and systems that are connected, integrated and secure across all platforms, from work and home to car and mobile. Adobe has a long history collaborating with HARMAN, which is a key partner for Flash runtime migration and enterprise support as companies transition their existing ActionScript and Flex applications to new technologies. HARMAN has also been supporting customers with bespoke versions of Adobe AIR for the past decade.

Adobe will provide basic security support – limited to security fixes only for desktop platforms (Windows 7 and above, and Mac OS X) – for Adobe AIR v32 until the end of 2020. After that time, Adobe support for AIR will be discontinued and ongoing support will be managed by HARMAN and communicated by them directly. However, beginning with the release of AIR v33 by HARMAN, developers should contact HARMAN directly for AIR support on both mobile and desktop platforms – including bug fixes, platform compatibility, and new and improved functionality.

This means HARMAN will now control the future of the AIR platform and I would certainly expect Adobe tools to complete the transition away from supporting Flash, removing a great deal of the developer appeal in the first place.  You can learn more about HARMAN’s future plans for the Flash/AIR platform here.

GameDev News


30. May 2019


GDevelop, the open source beginner friendly 2D game engine, just released beta 70.  We recently mentioned GDevelop in our Codeless Game Engines article and have previously covered it in depth in this video.


There are no formal release notes, just this tweet:

image


The star feature of this release is certainly the ability to create custom behaviors using the build in event system, in addition to the existing JavaScript method.  Details on creating custom behaviors is available here.  GDevelop is available for Mac, Windows and Linux and can be downloaded here.

GameDev News


29. May 2019


Krita is an open source painting application available for Windows, MacOS and Linux.  It has improved massively over the last two years and continued that process today with the release of Krita 4.2.  This release fixed over a thousand new bugs, adds HDR rendering support, improved tablet support and much more.

Highlight features from the release notes:

  • Updated Tablet Support for Windows, Linux and macOS
  • HDR Painting
  • Improved brush speed performance with vectorization and lock-free programming
  • Improved Color Palette Docker
  • Animation Python API
  • Configure File backups
  • Color Gamut Masking
  • News about Krita Widget
  • Improved Artistic Color Selector
  • Undo operations with move tool
  • Move and transform selections
  • Improve display of memory usage
  • Overview Docker improvements
  • Resize layer thumbnails
  • Multibrush improvements
  • Painting mask performance improvement
  • Improvement to Select Opaque
  • Sharpness Changes
  • Flow/Opacity Changes
  • Clone Brush – Reset Origin
  • Simplex Noise Generator
  • New Blend modes
  • 1,000+ Bug fixes


Krita 4.2 is available for download right here.

GameDev News Art


23. May 2019


Scirra announced today that they will be adding JavaScript language support to their currently codeless cross platform game engine, Construct 3.  We did a hands-on video on Construct 3 shortly after it was released, and the lack of scripting support was one of my biggest complaints.

Details of the new scripting support from the Construct blog:

We are well aware that not programming has been central to the design of Construct since Construct 2. We know many of our users will have chosen Construct specifically for this reason. Some may even have no intention of ever using coding. We're still committed to this approach and also fully intend to keep developing features for events. So why are we doing this?

At Scirra we've always aimed to help get more people involved with and excited about technology. We want to make amazing tools that make incredible technologies accessible to all, allowing them to be active creators rather than passive consumers. With the rising profile of technology in the world today and more people than ever getting involved with technology and programming, we think this is an important step towards that goal.

Details about price:

Once we're ready to launch it, the scripting feature will be sold as a separate add-on for Construct. However anyone who's ever had a Construct 3 subscription - of any kind, past or present - will get the scripting add-on for free, for life, at no additional cost. Currently this still applies to new subscribers too, so if you want to use the feature and have been thinking about subscribing, you'll save money if you subscribe now! We'll announce the cut-off date for this offer in the near future.

Details about the timeline:

We are aiming to have an early version of the scripting feature in the next beta release of Construct some time in the next couple of weeks. If you're already a subscriber, you'll be able to test it as soon as the next beta. The feature will continue to develop and expand over time, and we'll likely have more news about it in future. So stay tuned and we look forwards to seeing what you can all do with it!

GameDev News


23. May 2019


One common problem with game development is compression, it’s a classic trade-off.  Do you save disk space at the cost of either performance or VRAM usage or do you favor performance at the cost of size?  When it comes to GPU Image Textures, this is exactly the trade-off Binomial is trying to get rid off.  Thanks to a recent partnership with Google, their work is now available and open source!

Details from the Google open source blog:

Today, Google and Binomial are excited to announce that we have partnered to open source the Basis Universal texture codec to improve the performance of transmitting images on the web and within desktop and mobile applications, while maintaining GPU efficiency. This release fills an important gap in the graphics compression ecosystem and complements earlier work in Draco geometry compression.


The Basis Universal texture format is 6-8 times smaller than JPEG on the GPU, yet is a similar storage size as JPEG – making it a great alternative to current GPU compression methods that are inefficient and don’t operate cross platform – and provides a more performant alternative to JPEG/PNG. It creates compressed textures that work well in a variety of use cases - games, virtual & augmented reality, maps, photos, small-videos, and more!

----

How does it all work? Compress your image using the encoder, choosing the quality settings that make sense for your project (you can also submit multiple images for small videos or optimization purposes, just know they’ll share the same color palette). Insert the transcoder code before rendering, which will turn the intermediary format into the GPU format your computer can read. The image stays compressed throughout this process, even on your GPU!  Instead of needing to decode and read the whole image, the GPU will read only the parts it needs. Enjoy the performance benefits!

The project is available now, open sourced under the Apache 2.0 license on GitHub.  This new technology should be a great boon to game engines and tools hoping to support texture compression across a number of devices, and I assume will make it’s way into more Google products as time goes on.

GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List