Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
11. February 2019


Today the rumour mills heated up around a possible Unity IPO coming in early 2020.  An IPO, or Initial Public Offering, is the process by which a private company like Unity Technologies becomes a publically traded company, with stocks traded on a stock exchange.  From the site Cheddar:

Video game development platform Unity Technologies is gearing up to go public, according to people familiar with the matter.

The company, which was valued at a little more than $3 billion as of its last funding round in June 2018, is aiming to do its initial public offering during the first half of 2020 ー provided that market conditions are favorable, a source told Cheddar. CEO John Riccitiello told Cheddar in April of 2018 that the company was earning about $300 million in annual revenue.

A Unity spokesperson said it doesn't comment on IPO rumors or speculation.

In the end, this is just speculation of something that has already been all but confirmed.  From the same website back in April, 2018:

The company may also go public. "That's the general path," said Riccitiello. "We're not putting out dates but I do believe the company is strong enough financially to go public now."

He said the company has around $300 million in revenue and is seeing "very aggressive growth."

Even further back in VentureBeat:

GamesBeat: For the investors, is there a timetable now? Are they now the majority of the ownership?

Riccitiello: No, they’re not a majority yet. The majority of the company is still owned by the founders and the employees. I’ve told them that we’re not doing an IPO before 2019, and I don’t know if we’re going to do one in 2019. There are lots of reasons to continue to grow our business the way we’re doing it. What every investor says now, and it’s sort of a knee-jerk thing, is that they’re patient. Sequoia’s been in this for eight years. They all say that, I think, because they don’t want to not get chosen because they’re in a hurry to generate liquidity on an investment they haven’t even made yet. But that’s what they’ve all said. They’re in it for the long term.

At some point, Unity is Switzerland, right? We serve all platforms. We’re better as an independent company. The long-term outcome is likely an IPO. But for now we have adequate capital. We don’t need to do an IPO any time soon. We’ll pick the right time for it.


So, this rumour isn’t exactly new, nor shocking.  In fact it’s the natural end state for companies that take venture funding, as Unity have multiple times.  Investors either lose their investment, sell to another investor early on, or get a return on their investment in the form of either the sale of a company to a larger company or through a public stock offering via an IPO.  At the end of the day, Unity going public should have almost no major impact on Unity developers.  Now Unity being acquired by a large company… that’s a much different story!

GameDev News


8. February 2019


Today Unity released the Unity Measured Materials library, a collection of over 300 materials themed around automotive and transportation projects.  It contains hundreds of textures used to create Shader Graph materials.  You need to use Unity 2018.3 or later.

The library includes:

  • Fabrics with various weaves including herringbone, twill, brushed and plain weave
  • Leather including different grain patterns and multiple perforation styles
  • Suede
  • Multiple wood species
  • Multiple chrome finishes
  • Multiple metal finishes
  • Glass
  • Opaque plastic with multiple grain patterns
  • Transparent plastic
  • Car paint

The collection is free on the Unity Asset Store available here.  Currently the materials only work with the HDRP with the lightweight pipeline being supported in the future.  As you may notice from the video below… your mileage may vary!

Art GameDev News


7. February 2019


Today we are looking at the Magnum Engine, a cross platform C++ game framework, which just released version 2019.1.  It is very similar in scope and functionality to the Kha Framework and the BS::Framework.  The Magnum Engine is completely modular, so you only pay for the functionality you need and ignore the rest.  It provides most of the functionality you would require to build a game engine including rendering, scene graph, audio, input handling, texture and model loaders and more.

The Magnum Engine is available on the following platforms and/or using the following renderers:

  • Linux and embedded Linux
  • Windows, Windows RT (Store/Phone)
  • macOS, iOS
  • Android
  • Web (asm.js or WebAssembly), through Emscripten

Graphics APIs:

  • OpenGL 2.1 through 4.6, core profile functionality and modern extensions
  • OpenGL ES 2.0, 3.0–3.2 and extensions to match desktop OpenGL functionality
  • WebGL 1.0, 2.0 and extensions to match desktop OpenGL functionality


The project is open source and hosted on GitHub under the MIT open source license.  Getting started documentation is available here while several compiled examples can be found here.  To learn more about the Magnum Engine, be sure to check out the video below.

GameDev News Programming


6. February 2019


In addition to their currently running Game Industry Book bundle, Humble have launched another Humble Bundle aimed at game developers, the Intro To Code bundle.  This one contains a series of tutorials about mostly game development topics including Unity, Blender, JavaScript, VR, Phaser 3 and Python game development, as well as a few courses on web development and other topics.  A portion of your purchase also goes to charity, as well as helping to support this channel.

The tutorials are from Zenva, and include both step by step video instruction and printed course notes, as well as downloads with all the required assets.  As with all Humble Bundles, this one is priced at multiple tiers, as follows:

$1 Tier

  • Learn Python Programming by Making a Game
  • Intro to Game Development
  • Numpy Matrices and Vectors
  • Learn HTML and CSS by creating a Responsive Company Website
  • The Complete Responsive Web Design Course

$12 Tier

  • VR Projects – Flying Platform Experiences
  • Create a Road Crossing Game with Phaser 3
  • Create a Spanish Teaching Game with Phaser 3
  • Learn Angular by Creating a Web Application
  • Blender for Beginners – Craft Low Poly Game Assets
  • Create Your First 3D Game
  • JavaScript Programming – Learn by Making a Mobile Game
  • Beginning SQL

$25 Tier

  • Procedural Content Generation with Unity
  • VR Projects – 360 Photo Experience
  • Build a Virtual Pet Game with Phaser 3
  • Python Image Processing
  • Create a Raspberry Pi Smart Security Camera
  • The Complete Artificial Neural Network Course
  • RPG Game Development – Turn Based Battle Systems
  • Audio Effects and Soundtracks in Unity Games
  • Data Manipulation with Pandas
  • The Complete Guide to Bootstrap 4
  • Discover jQuery – Create Interactive Websites
  • Create an RPG Town with NPCS and Dialogs(Unity)

As always when the bundle is Game Development related, we purchased a copy and give a hands-on overview of what you receive in the video below.


GameDev News


5. February 2019


Phaser 3.16 has just been replaced, and this is the biggest update in Phaser 3’s history, finally bringing the open source HTML5 game frame work 100% feature completion.  Major aspects of this release include a new ScaleManager for multi-resolution support, a complete overhaul to the input handling systems (keyboard, touch and mouse), the ability to dynamically load scenes, improved documentation and Typescript definitions, hundreds of fixes and much more.  This release also contains several breaking changes, so be sure to take a good long read through the changelog before upgrading your existing Phaser 3 application.

I'm pleased to announce that Phaser 3.16 is now available. This version represents a significant milestone in the project as Phaser 3 is now 100% feature complete with all of the initially planned systems now in place. The most significant additions in 3.16 is the overhaul of the Input event handling, the long-awaited introduction of the Scale Manager, and the Extern Game Object, which allows for 3rd party rendering support, as required by Spine. Spine animation support is being handled exclusively through a Phaser Plugin. The current build of the Spine plugin can be found in this repo in the plugins folder, along with examples in the Phaser Labs. The Spine plugin will be developed independently of Phaser in the coming weeks.

This is the single largest update of Phaser 3 yet, and as such, there are breaking changes. I have painstakingly listed all of them in the Change Log, so please do read it if you're upgrading from an earlier version. I know there is a lot to take in, so I'll be covering the new features in the Phaser World newsletter in the coming weeks.

The first post-3.16 release of Phaser World is out now and available here, with this episode discussing the new Input System and external scene loading functionality.  We did a complete Getting Started tutorial shortly after Phaser 3 was released, which is now quite out of date.  I am considering doing a Phaser tutorial series in the same vein as the recently completed Godot tutorial, would you like to see this?

GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List