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22. November 2015

 

As per this blog post the first ever LibGDX game jam is happening in mid December and topic voting has begun.  From the announcement:

image

The 10 Rules of Jamming

  1. You must use libGDX to create a game that fits the theme
  2. You may work alone or in a team. Only one submission per person/team is allowed
  3. You may use pre-existing code, e.g. libraries like Ashley, or your own code libraries
  4. You may use pre-existing art, e.g. assets from OpenGameArt, or your own art
  5. You may use external tools like Tiled or Overlap2D
  6. You must not re-skin an already existing game or prototype!
  7. You must submit your game before the end of the 18th of January via the jam’s site on itch.io (to be made public :))
  8. You must publish the source of your game, e.g. to GitHub
  9. You must submit your game to the itch.io libGDX Jam page before the end of day January 18th, UTC-12!
  10. If you want to win one of the sponsored prizes, you must tweet about your game and document its development, using the hashtag “#libGDXJam” and the handles “@robovm” and “@robotality

Prizes & Judging

We are happy to have RoboVM and Robotality as sponsors for the following prizes:

  1. Grand Prize: Mac Mini, sponsored by RoboVM
  2. Silver: iPad, sponsored by RoboVM
  3. Bronze: iPod Touch, sponsored by RoboVM
  4. For 20 random submissions: Steam keys for Halfway, sponsored by Robotality
  5. For another 5 random submissions: libGDX Jam t-shirt, by yours truely

To qualify for any of the prizes, you’ll need to follow rule 10 as outlined above. Judging works as follows:

  • The community can vote on itch.io from the 19th of January to the 2nd of February
  • The Grand Prize will be awarded to the entry with the highest community votes on itch.io. This way the highest quality entry will win!
  • The Silver and Bronze prizes will be awarded to the entries with the best mixture of dev logs and tweets and community votes. Our sponsors and the libGDX core team will pick these entries. This should motivate people to make some noise on the web and document their progress for the greater good of the community!
  • The random awards guarantee that everyone has a chance to win a prize!
  • The winners will be announced on the 3rd of February!

To view suggested comments and to cast your vote, head on over here.

GameDev News


21. November 2015

 

Until now your language choices when using Unreal Engine have either been the high level graphical Blueprints or low level C++.  Today however NCSoft, makers of Lineage, Guildwars and more just release an extension that adds Javascript support to UE4.  Announced on the UE4 forums (login may be required) the extension was released on Github with full source under the Apache2 open source license.  From the readme:

Features
  • Powered by latest V8 (ES6)
  • CommonJS modules
  • Full access to the whole UnrealEngine API
  • Free to subclass existing classes including blueprint
  • Web-dev like UMG (Jade, pseudo-css, pseudo-angular.js)
  • Live reload
  • Communicate with outer world: REST, process(pipe), arraybuffer, ...
  • Bridge API for editor extension
  • Auto-completion for Visual Studio (auto-generated *.d.ts)
  • Dedicated Javascript console on UnrealEditor

The add-on is tightly integrated with Unreal including the ability to subclass existing classes:

class MyActor extends Actor {
  properties() {
    this.MyProp/*EditAnywhere+Replicated+int*/;
  }
  RPC(x/*int*/) /*Server+Reliable*/ {
    console.log('This function is replicated',this.MyProp++);
  }
}
let MyActor_C = require('uclass')()(global,MyActor);
if (GWorld.IsServer()) { 
  new MyActor_C(GWorld);
}


Very cool.  Head on over to the Github page for installation instructions.

GameDev News


20. November 2015

 

RoboVM, the makers of technology that enabled you to run Java applications (such as LibGDX) on iOS, just released version 1.11.  The major features of this release are Bitcode, iOS 9.1 and Kotlin support.

robovm

From the complete release notes:

Experimental Bitcode Support

We’ve been hard at work adding initial bitcode support to RoboVM. Bitcode allows Apple to recompile your app on their servers to exploit new CPU features. Currently, watchOS and tvOS both require apps to be submitted as bitcode. For iOS, bitcode submissions are currently optional. This experimental feature is currently targeted at iOS, and represents the first step towards future watchOS and tvOS support.

This experimental support allows you to submit your apps for iOS to the App Store with bitcode enabled. You can enable bitcode from the IPA creation dialogs in both IntelliJ IDEA/RoboVM Studio and Eclipse:

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 14.58.32

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 15.01.04

You can also enable bitcode-enabled IPA creation in Gradle

./gradlew createIPA -Probovm.enableBitcode=true

or Maven

mvn robovm:createIPA -Drobovm.enableBitcode=true

Note that bitcode support is highly experimental at this point, and we do not yet give support for it. As a next step, we will be focusing on tvOS support, making it a new build target and exposing its APIs.

Kotlin Support

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 15.04.28

One of the reasons we love the JVM ecosystem is the multitude of alternative JVM languages available. We’ve had an eye on JetBrains’ Kotlin for a long time now. As Kotlin is nearing its 1.0 release, we thought it’d be a good time to give our users Kotlin support as well!

Screen Shot 2015-11-18 at 15.12.54

Building on the latest Kotlin Beta, you can now create cross-platform Android and iOS app in Kotlin from within RoboVM Studio or IntelliJ IDEA! Simply update to the latest RoboVM IntellIJ IDEA plugin or RoboVM Studio version and use the project creation wizard to get started.

iOS 9.1 Support

RoboVM 1.11 brings you full bindings for iOS 9.1, including new additions to AudioToolbox, CloudKit, and UIKit and the new 3D-Touch APIs. Check out our API diffs to learn what’s changed!

Bug Fixes & Enhancements

As always, we squashed bugs, improved performance and added some bells and whistles. Here are the most important changes:

GameDev News


19. November 2015

 

I remember using Allegro wayyyyyy back in the day in the early 1990s.  It was one of few graphics libraries available for DOS based machines (even though it started life as an Atari library) and certainly one of the only free game libraries available.  Amazingly enough Allegro is still under active development.  Anyways enough reminiscing…  today Allegro.js was released, an HTML5 library inspired by Allegro.  For a brand new library there is already an impressive amount of documentation and reference material available.  One of the hallmarks of the Allegro library was it was brutally simple to use and Allegro.js seems to have carried on that tradition.  Here is an example Allegro app:

 

// bitmap oobjects
var logo,ball;

// sample object
var bounce;

// size and speed of the ball
var size=64,speed=5;

// positon of the ball
var cx=100,cy=100;

// velocity of the ball
var vx=speed,vy=speed;

// drawing function
function draw()
{
   // draw allegro logo background
   stretch_blit(logo,canvas,0,0,logo.w,logo.h,0,0,SCREEN_W,SCREEN_H);
   
   // draws the ball resized to size*size, centered
   // stretch it a bit vertically according to velocity
   stretch_sprite(canvas,ball,cx-size/2,cy-size/2,size,size+abs(vy));
}

// update game logic
function update()
{
   // did the ball bounce off the wall this turn?
   var bounced=false;

   
   // if the ball is going to collide with screen bounds
   // after applying velocity, if so, reverse velocity
   // and remember that it bonced
   if (cx+vx>SCREEN_W-size/2) {vx=-speed;bounced=true;}
   if (cy+vy>SCREEN_H-size/2) {vy=-speed*3;bounced=true;}
   if (cx+vx<size/2) {vx=speed;bounced=true;}
   if (cy+vy<size/2) {vy=speed;bounced=true;}
      
   // move the ball
   cx+=vx;
   cy+=vy;
   
   // if it bounced, play a sound
   if (bounced) play_sample(bounce);
   
   // add gravity
   vy+=.3;
}

// entry point of our example
function main()
{
   // enable debugging to console element
   enable_debug("debug");
   
   // init all subsystems, put allegro in canvas with id="canvas_id"
   // make the dimesnions 640x480
   allegro_init_all("canvas_id", 640, 480);
   
   // load ball image
   ball = load_bmp("data/planet.png");
   
   // load background image
   logo = load_bmp("data/allegro.png");
   
   // load the bounce sound
   bounce = load_sample("data/bounce.mp3");

   // make sure everything has loaded
   ready(function(){
      
      // repeat this game loop
      loop(function(){
         
         // clear screen
         clear_to_color(canvas, makecol(255, 255, 255));

         // update game logic
         update();

         // render everything
         draw();
   
      // all this happens 60 times per second
      }, BPS_TO_TIMER(60));
   });
   
   // the end
   return 0;
}
// make sure that main() gets called as soon as the wesbite has loaded
END_OF_MAIN();

 

If this looks interesting to you be sure to check out Allegro.js.  It looks like a cool library, based on another cool library, just waiting for a community to form around it.

GameDev News Programming


19. November 2015

 

The Leadwerks Game Engine game launcher now works with SteamOS with a few caveats.  From the Leadwerks blog:

Leadwerks Game Launcher now works with SteamOS, with some caveats.


First, you must set the application to use the "Official Bindings" controller configuration by Leadwerks Software.


When you start Leadwerks Game Launcher on SteamOS, a page of available games will be shown.  Click on the game you want to play.  The game will be shown on a new page, and a blue button will appear on the bottom left of the screen.  You can press the B button on your controller to go back to the main page, or mouse the cursor over the blue button and click (right trigger).
The application will pause while the game is downloaded.  At this time no progress indicator is shown while downloading, but most games only take a few seconds.  The game will then launch.  Most games can be exited by pressing the right arrow button just to the right of the Steam button on your controller. Some games will presently not work correctly.
To exit the game launcher, press the right arrow button just to the right of the Steam button.
Attached Image

GameDev News


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