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7. November 2019


Back at GDC 2019, Unity announced Havok Physics would be coming soon.  Yesterday, Havok for Unity was released as a preview package in the Unity Package manager.  The Havok physics implementation is built on the DOTS framework therefore you will require Unity 2019.1 for higher to run it.

Details of the Havok preview from the Unity blog:

When we first set out to define what the future of physics would look like with our Data-Oriented Technology Stack (DOTS), we sought a partner that shared the same core concepts and values as us. Through our partnership with Havok, we were able to leverage DOTS to deliver the highly optimized, stateless, entirely C#, and performant Unity Physics. We also knew that some of you would have more complex simulation requirements, needing a stateful physics system. For that reason, we knew Havok would be the perfect solution to integrate into Unity for those high-end simulation needs.

Some of you might be asking, “Ok, but why did you make two systems instead of just one?” We know that our users have a plethora of different use cases, and we wanted to give everyone a choice based on what their needs are. For some, Unity Physics will suffice, while others will want the benefits and enhanced workflows of Havok Physics. Ultimately, there is no right or wrong choice, as we illustrate later in this blog post. You can switch between either solver without having to reauthor all of your content completely.

An obvious question you may have is, why should I choose Havok over the new Unity physics engine?  This is explained in the Havok documentation:

  • Higher simulation performance : Havok Physics is a stateful engine, which makes it more performant than Unity.Physics for scenes with significant numbers of rigid bodies, due to automatic sleeping of inactive rigid bodies and other advanced caching techniques (typically 2x or more faster).

  • Higher simulation quality : Havok Physics is a mature engine which is robust to many use cases. In particular, it offers stable stacking and a solution for smoothing out contact points when rigid bodies slide quickly over each other (known as "welding").

  • Deep profiling and debugging of physics simulations using the Havok "Visual Debugger" standalone application (available on Windows only).

You can learn more about the Havok preview in the video below.  In addition to an overview of what Havok physics is all about, it also covers the installation process and illustrates how to configure and run the Havok Visual Debugger.  The example repository used in the video is available here.

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5. November 2019


Excellent news for Unreal Engine developers, we have another year of Unreal Asset Marketplace giveaways!  This consists of 5 assets free for the month (and yours forever if “purchased”) as well as 3 asset packs that are free forever.

This month’s content consist of:

Free For November

Free Forever

In addition to the giveaway, they are running an appreciate sale on Nov 5th and 6th, featuring assets from last years giveaways for 50% off.  If you are interested in learning more about these assets, be sure to check out the video below. 

GameDev News


4. November 2019


The Godot open source game engine is growing at a massive rate.  To properly manage that growth and to set expectations of community behaviour, Godot have released a code of conduct.

From the Godot blog, details of why they created a code of conduct:

During the past five years of free and open source, collaborative development, we've been blessed with one of the best-behaved online communities that I have been in contact with. The vast majority of users on all our community platforms dearly care both for the Godot project itself, but also for all their fellow participants.

Yet there are occasional outliers, and to properly moderate an ever growing community (more than doubling in size each year) we need a written statement for the de facto guidelines that our moderation teams have applied until now. This will give users a clear overview of our expectations for positive and respectful behavior. Community moderators, who are also participants donating their free time to ensure a safe environment for all users, will therefore be able to back their decisions with common guidelines.

You can read the specifics of the new code of conduct here.  You can learn more about the change in the video below.  If you are interested in learning more about the Godot Engine be sure to check out our tutorial series or our complete 2D game in Godot tutorial.

GameDev News


3. November 2019


TexGraph is a free procedural texture generation tool that runs on the Windows platform.  TexGraph is described as follows:

TexGraph is a procedural texture creation tool that let you create textures by connecting nodes in a graph. It is designed to be similar to other tools in the market but at the same time be very simple and easy to use and extent by users.

If you are a shader programmer you can create your own nodes or edit the existing ones. Check the github page https://github.com/galloscript/TexGraph-Public and the Programming Custom Nodes section of the user manual for more information.

TexGraph is available for download on Itch.io here.  While not open source, TexGraph is very easy to customize.  New nodes are simply GLSL scripts, while new models and HDR maps can easily be added to the project.

You can learn more about TexGraph and see it in action in the video below.  Another similar tool to TexGraph is the Godot based Material Maker project that you can learn more about here.

GameDev News


1. November 2019


The Khronos Group have just released the Vulkan Unified Samples Repository, a single location for the best tutorials and code samples for learning and using the Vulkan API.

Details from the Khronos blog:

Today, The Khronos® Group releases the Vulkan ® Unified Samples Repository, a new central location where anyone can access Khronos-reviewed, high-quality Vulkan code samples in order to make development easier and more streamlined for all abilities. Khronos and its members, in collaboration with external contributors, created the Vulkan Unified Samples Project in response to user demand for more accessible resources and best practices for developing with Vulkan. Within Khronos, the Vulkan Working Group discovered that there were many useful and high-quality samples available already (both from members and external contributors), but they were not all in one central location. Additionally, there was no top-level review of all the samples for interoperability or compatibility. This new repository project was created to solve this challenge by putting resources in one place, ensuring samples are reviewed and maintained by Khronos. They are then organized into a central library available for developers of all abilities to use, learn from, and gain ideas.

The first group of samples includes a generous donation of performance-based samples and best practice documents from Khronos member, Arm.

The repository is hosted entirely on GitHub under the Apache 2.0 source license.  The code samples are located here.

You can learn more in the video below.

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