Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
6. January 2012

 

 

 

Coming to Blender from other modelling packages, a few things are much less intuitive than you would expect.  I’ve been neglecting things from the art side of the fence for quite a while, so I am going to address that.  This post covers a couple handy tricks in Blender.  If you are a vet, these things will be “well duh!” items, but if you are new to Blender I think you will find them handy.

 

 

 

Insetting a polygon

 

This is a common enough task that is frankly rather irritating to accomplish in Blender.  An inset polygon can basically be though of as a polygon within a polygon, generally flush to the containing polygon.

 

Wow, that was a terrible description!  Lets use a picture instead.  This is an inset polygon:

 

imageimage

 

Here is how you create one.

 

Press Tab to enter Edit Mode

 

CTRL+Tab+3 for face mode

 

Select your face to inset

 

Hit E to extrude.  Immediately click the right mouse button.  You have now created a new face exactly over your existing face, with the exact same dimensions.

 

Now hit S to scale your face, and drag the mouse until it is inset as much as you would like.  Left click when complete.  And you are done.

 

 

 

 

Handy tip

One thing to be aware of when using the extrude tool, even if you hit escape or otherwise cancel, the face is still extruded!  Why? Beats the hell out of me, this seems like a really stupid thing to do, as it clutters up your mesh with overlapping vertices and edges you don’t need.  So if you are doing an extrude, after you cancel, make sure you undo it!


 

 

 

That’s not really an outrageous amount of work to inset a face, but it is enough to be annoying, especially for a task I do so commonly.  Thankfully, there is a plugin available to make your life easier!  I believe it started shipping in Blender 2.58, but I wouldn’t recommend quoting me on that!

 

 

Lets go ahead an enable that plugin now.

 

In the top menu select File –> User Preferences…

Select the Addons tab

Scroll down and locate Mesh: Inset Polygon, then enable it using the checkbox at the top right like this:

 

image

 

Now, if you want to keep this enabled permanently click Save as Default at the bottom left corner of the window:

image

 

Now there is an Inset Polygon tool available.

 

Back in Blender in the Mesh Tools sidebar ( press T if it isn’t currently visible ) you will now have a new option.

 

image

 

You will now be able to use the Inset command.  Once you click Inset, the below option will appear. 

 

Amount determines far inset the new polygon will be.

 

Height determines how far out the face will be raised.

 

 

You can inset multiple faces at the same time, but the results are “wonky”.  Which is to say, pretty much useless.

 

 

 

 

 

I find myself insetting quite often, in order to add details to my mesh, which leads to the next tip.  Creating a hole.  Consider a model like a gun, how exactly would you go creating the barrel of a gun?

 

 

 

Creating a hole in your mesh

 

 

So how exactly would you go about creating a hole like the barrel of a gun?

 

 

Well, start a new scene and inset just like we just covered:

 

image

 

Now hit the W key then select Subdivide from the menu that pops up.  This will subdivide the selected face into 4 sub-faces, like such:

image

 

For rounder edges, you can subdivide again.  Now we want to “round out” our square selection into a circle.  Hit the spacebar and type “Sphere” in the menu you want to select To Sphere:

 

image

 

Now move your mouse cursor to the right until your selection is rounded, like this:

 

image

 

Now press E to extrude and pull your new hole:

 

image

 

And now you have a rounded(ish) hole in your mesh!  For smoother corners, make more sub-divisions before you call To Sphere.

 

 

Straighten Vertices

 

Want to line up a number of vertices at once, here is how:

 

Select your vertices

image

 

Now there are a few ways of approach this.  First you can set a pivot to line up around.

 

To do so, hold down the . key and click where you want the pivot to be.  Such as this:

 

image

 

 

Now to move all the vertices to line up with the pivot point, you:

 

Press Scale, then the axis you want ( in this case red, or X ), then hit 0.

 

So, hit S then X then 0.  Finally left click to accept the changes.

And presto!

 

image

 

All the vertices line up along the selected axis.

 

You can do the same thing relative to the selected vertices.  In that case, select your vertices and be sure to move your pivot point back to either median or active element, using this option:

 

image

 

Now change the orientation to Normal:

 

image

 

 

So, if you chose Median Point and set Orientation to Normal, it will look like this now:

image

 

The axis on the widget determine which axis to align along.  Green is Y, red is X and blue is Z. 

 

Let's say you wanted to flatten along the z-axis.  Simply S(cale), Z then 0 and left click, and your results will be lines up along the Z axis. Like such:

 

image

Art


5. December 2011

 

I just finished publishing my very first product review, this one covering Photoshop Touch for Android.  The whole world is looking for an alternative to the extremely expensive Photoshop CS without avail, has one finally arrived on Android for a mere 10$?

 

 

Read the review to find out!

 

If you only want to see the results, click here for the results instead.

 

 

 

This is my first ever, and hopefully first of many, product review.  It is long, it seems to be the way I do things.  I would love to have feedback on the format, style and contents!  Did it help you?  Do I ramble?  What would you like to stay the same and what would you like to see done differently in future reviews?

 

 

Art


5. October 2011

 

So if you want to stay on the bleeding edge, go get it.

 

Or of course you can just wait 10 days for the 2.60 official release.

 

The main changes are:

 

Not really a ton there for game developers yet.  Was kind of hoping 2.60 was when BMesh would get merged in.  Haven’t personally checked this release out and will probably wait for the non-RC release.

Art


2. October 2011

 

This is a pretty common gotcha when working with Unity, but it’s so damned annoying it’s worth bringing attention to it.very-small-baby

 

If you export an FBX model, in this case from Blender, into Unity it might be really really really really tiny, even though you set it’s size up appropriately in Blender before exporting.

 

This is caused by the FBX importer in Unity, which for some reason imports at a scale of 0.01.  Why?  I’m not sure anyone knows, but if you encounter this problem be sure to check this first.

 

Click your imported model in the project panel.

In the Inspector, scroll down to the (FBXImporter) section.

Locate Scale Factor and change it to 1.

 

image

 

 

Now your model should appear… normal sized.  Remember by default 1 == 1 meter.

Programming Art


1. October 2011

 

 

I love Blender, but one of the hands down most irritating things is the default hotkey for switching between Vertex,Edge and Face editing modes.  CTRL + TAB + 1/2/3 is just too many keys for something common.  Fortunately Blender 2.5x adds the ability to define hotkeys, but it isn’t as easy as you might expect.

 

 

The steps:

 

Press CTRL + ALT + U to bring up user preferences.

 

Select the Input Tab

 

Scroll down and expand 3D View –> Mesh, like such:

image

 

Click the Add New button:

image

 

 

Add the following three entries:

 

image

 

 

In my case I am using a Mac keyboard, which has an F16, F17 and F18 key above the numberpad.  You can use whatever value you want ( that aren’t used in Mesh mode already). 

 

The value entered in Context Attrib is “tool_settings.mesh_select_mode”.  The Value: fields represent what modes to enable, vertices, edges and faces in that order.  So True, False, False says to enable Vertices, but not Faces or Edges.

 

 

Now, voila.  I click “Save as Default” and now I have a single hotkey for toggling between the editing modes.  I really should have done this ages ago.  In the meanwhile I learned the Blender customization is downright amazing.

Art


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List