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28. September 2018

In Unity 2018, Unity released a new programmable graphic pipeline.  Alongside this release they implemented two pipelines, the new HD pipeline and the Lightweight Render Pipeline(LWRP).  Today they released a new version of the LWRP, 4.0.0 preview.  If you are using the existing lightweight pipeline in your project be sure to pay close attention as there are code breaking changes in this release.  This release includes a switch to physically based lighting that will see lighting reduced from three render passes to one.  The forward renderer in the LWRP also has the ability to reduce draw calls by half.

Details of the new pipeline from the Unity blog:


This version changes the light attenuation computation to be physically based. This change means that you don’t have to increase the range of your light to control the attenuation. Instead, you should control the attenuation with the light intensity. Baked GI has changed to match the realtime attenuation. When you upgrade to LWRP 4.0.0-preview, it is likely that you have to upgrade your light settings as well.


We are pushing work to have LWRP out of preview as soon as possible. Therefore for this version, we focused most of our time in API design to implement much feedback we received over the past months and evolve both our C# and shader API to be more easy to use, extensible and flexible.


This version introduces API breaking changes. Breaking changes are the reason we bumped the major version number. If you didn’t fork LWRP or authored custom shaders without using ShaderGraph, upgrading your shaders to this version requires some work. We apologize for the nuisance, but this is required so we can evolve. Once out of preview, there won’t be any more breaking changes.


Please check the changelog to help you upgrade shaders to version 4.0.0-preview and reach out in this thread with upgrading issues so we can help you.

Be sure to watch the following video for details on how to install and configure the 4.0.0 preview LWRP.

GameDev News


12. September 2018


Back in July, Unity announced a partnership with Google on future game based networking solutions.  Open Match, an open source matchmaking solution.  Matchmaking is one of those challenges all networked games face.  Do you run your own custom servers, or use a 3rd party service for matchmaking?  Running your own servers obviously comes with a cost as well as additional support requirements, while farming it out to a third party leaves you exposed if they ever shutdown.  Open Match might be a good compromise solution, enabling game engine agnostic networking that runs in standard docking containers or in the future, hosted on Unity servers.


Primary features of Open Match:

Extensibility. Custom match logic examples are available for simple player matchmaking based on latency, wait time, and an arbitrary skill rating.

Flexibility. Because Open Match runs on Kubernetes, you can deploy it on any public cloud, local data center, or even on a local workstation.

Scalability. Open Match is designed using proven web microservices patterns, and with Kubernetes as the underlying platform, adding additional capacity to your APIs when you have more customers is as simple as a single command. Kubernetes autoscaling can be used to automate it as well.

Open Match is not tied directly to Google nor Unity:

Although Open Match is co-founded by Google Cloud and Unity, it’s game engine agnostic. It can be integrated into any game, regardless of how the game is built or what infrastructure it’s running on. Unity will be basing future matchmaking technology on Open Match, so Unity customers will be able to more easily take advantage of its features, such as through integration with Unity-provided servers. The Open Match GitHub repo is now open for contributions, and you can follow the example provided in the development setup guide to start experimenting today.

Open match is in alpha now and is not ready for production usage.  It is released under the Apache 2 open source license and is written using the Go programming language.

GameDev News


12. September 2018


The first beta of Unity 2018.3 was just released and can be downloaded here or from the Unity hub.  By far and away the star of the 2018.3 release is the new ability to nest prefabs, instead of forcing you to organized your prefabs in giant monolithic structures or tiny granular detail, you can now mix and match, composing prefabs out of other prefabs.  If you are interested in learning more about this new feature, be sure you check out the dedicated Unity page on prefabs.

This release also included several other improvements including:

  • Improved Prefab workflows
  • Terrain System Improvements (Preview)
  • Isometric 2D Tilemaps
  • 2D Animation V2
  • High Definition Render Pipeline (Preview)
  • Memory Profiler (Preview)
  • New Default Scripting Runtime
  • Editor Improvements

Additionally there are an absolutely huge number of fixes and improvements in this release.  For full details be sure to check the complete release notes for details.

GameDev News


18. July 2018


When I started GameFromScratch, by far and away the most common question I got was “what programming language should I use?”.  It’s amazing how much the world has changed in the last decade!  These days game engines are by far more important than programming language to the majority of developers, and one game engine has risen to the forefront of most peoples consciousness…  Unity.

I consistently cover a wide variety of game engines, here, on DevGa.me and on YouTube and one comment comes up far more often than any other...  “Why Not Just Use Unity?”.  Why would I use this game engine instead of Unity.  So I decided to take some time and answer exactly this question.  The short hand text version is available here as well as covered in a great deal more detail in this video.

GameDev News Programming


10. July 2018


Today Unity 2018.2 was released out of beta.  Many of the big new features were announced in Unity 2018.1, with Unity 2018.2 being all about improving those features, although a few new surprises are in store in this release.  From quality of life improvements, like finally improving HDPI support on Windows and Linux as well as a new preview debugger extension for Visual Studio Code, to new rendering features in both the light weight and high definition pipelines.  Some features we’ve previously discussed like the Pixel Perfect Camera and the new Shader Graph have been improved in this release.


Details of the release from the Unity Blog:

Unity 2018.2 optimizes the performance of the Lightweight Render Pipeline (LWRP) and enhances the High Definition Render Pipeline (HDRP) to help you achieve high-end visual quality, including multiple improvements to the Shader Graph, which now supports both pipelines (please note that both the LWRP and HDRP are currently in preview.)

We also added support for managed code debugging on iOS and Android,  Windows, macOS, UWP and PS4 for IL2CPP, and we started adding some mobile optimizations to the Lightweight Render Pipeline (LWRP).

For Android projects, 64-bit (ARM64) support gets its final release, and we now let you add Java code to your Unity plugins folder without needing to create libraries in advance.

Finally, several new 2D features are available as Preview packages, including the Vector Graphics importer and Pixel Perfect. The Vector Graphics importer makes it easier for you to work with SVG graphics, and Pixel Perfect makes it easier for you to achieve a perfect retro look across different resolutions on a wide range of devices.


Be sure to read the complete blog for full details on the release, or watch the video below.  You can download Unity here.

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