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3. July 2019


In a Unity blog post today, Unity announced that Enlighten support was being removed from the Unity game engine.  Enlighten is the lightmapping and global illumination solution used in Unity since Unity 5 was released.  Enlighten was original developed by Geomerics, which was acquired by ARM technologies in 2013, then the technology was sold to Silicon Studio in 2017.

Details of the removal on the Unity blog:

Due to Geomerics shutting down Enlighten as a product, Unity is required to remove Enlighten.

Unity will continue support for Enlighten in the built-in renderer as it currently exists today (as-is, with no new platform support). The 2020 LTS will be the last version to contain Enlighten functionality for the built-in renderer, and it is fully removed in 2021.1.

Projects authored with HDRP Preview Enlighten functionality will continue to be supported as it currently exists today (as-is, with no new platform support) in 2019 LTS, with full removal of Enlighten functionality from HDRP in 2020.1.

They are working on a solution:

We are also fully committed to delivering a real-time GI replacement solution in 2021.1. The Unity team has a solid plan to solve this complex problem the right way, with great artists workflow and optimal runtime performance for 2021.1.

Additionally, in the linked forum discussion are some good details on the limitations of the current Enlighten solution that will be addressed in their new in-house solution:

Enlighten has had a good run for the money, some of the best looking titles have shipped using it. However, some of the underlying principles means that it is not a good fit moving forward.
Enlighten is largely surface based, requires a global pre-computation phase and is limited to diffuse transport with no real support for physically based non-opaque materials. Some of the drivers moving forward are:

  • Fast iteration: Time-to-first-pixel needs to be fast, cannot have a lengthy pre-compute step.
  • Easy authoring: We need to remove the dependency on authoring suitable UVs and other surface based authoring.
  • Dynamic worlds: In addition to dynamic materials and lighting setup, we have to support dynamic geometry (eg. for procedural games).
  • Unified lighting: The lighting container needs to be decoupled from surfaces. This allows all scene elements to use the same lighting including volumetrics and participating media.
  • Large worlds: Due to the sheer size of levels today we need an easy way to to do localized light transport where what is lit and what is affecting that lighting is decoupled.
  • Source access: We need to have full access to all source in-house. So that we can independently drive development forward, fix bugs and support future platforms. This is arguably the most important point.

For these reasons we have decided that the best course of action is to no longer pursue software we have limited control over and move on.
That said the feature set that is available now will be supported until 2023 (via 2020 LTS), and we are happy to support you in the transition.

I’m still not entirely certain what they mean by Geomerics shutting down however, as it’s resources were sold way back in 2017 and everything seems to be business as usual.

GameDev News


27. June 2019


Back in April Unity launched Unity Learn, a completely free online learning portal for learning various aspects of using the Unity game engine.  Today they have announced Unity Premium, a paid expansion of Unity learn.  Unity Learn Premium costs 15$ a month, and is included in current Unity Pro subscriptions.  There is a 30 day free trial available.

Details of Unity Learn Premium from the Unity blog:

We believe that everyone should have access to high-quality, free learning resources for Unity, and we will continue to add to and maintain the free courses, projects, and tutorials on Unity Learn. More in-depth and advanced resources for serious hobbyists and professionals who want to specialize in an industry or get direct guidance will be available through Unity Learn Premium.

If you have a Unity Plus or Unity Pro license, you can access Unity Learn Premium for free with your current subscription. Just log in with your Unity ID and go to Unity Learn Premium to start learning!

Otherwise, you can try Unity Learn Premium for 30 days, free. After that, you can continue accessing all the great resources and interactive learning on Unity Learn Premium for $15 a month. 

In addition to content from Unity, Learn Premium also includes courses from partners such as Udemy and Pluralsight.  They are also offering bi-weekly online interactive sessions as well as Streaming Labs, quick start courses in a web hosted Unity Editor.

Check out the contents of Unity Premium in the video below.

GameDev News


12. May 2019


Unity have just released their latest beta, Unity 2019.2, now available in the Beta Releases tab in the Unity Hub.  So shortly after GDC 2019, there aren’t many surprises in this release.

Highlights from the Unity 2019.2 release:

  • Optimized frame pacing on Android
  • Screen brightness control on iOS and Android
  • Improved screen cutout support (notches and chins)
  • Polybrush 1.0.0 package
  • Several features moved from editor to packages
  • LWRP improvements with experimental 2D renderer with pixel perfect and lighting
  • Intel Open Image Denoise support
  • GPU Lightmapper Improvements
  • NVIDIA OPTIX Denoiser improvements
  • New Cloud User Diagnostics
  • Unity Distribution Portal

Learn more about this release in the video below.

GameDev News


2. May 2019


Unity are currently running their annual May Madness sale on their asset store.  Over 380 of the most popular assets on the store are currently on sale for 50% off or more.  Additionally they are offering 4 theme based bundles at 55% off, where you only need to buy the items you don’t already own to get the additional savings.  Finally there are daily specials all month, that are up to 70% off.


The bundles include:

Platformer Bundle

Vegetation Bundle

Particle Bundle

Beginner Bundle

Obviously the daily special changes on a daily basis, so be sure to check the asset store daily for the new special.  Watch the video embedded below for more details.

GameDev News


16. April 2019


Hot on the heels of their 2019 GDC presentation, Unity 2019.1 was released today.  The 2019.1 release saw several of the key pieces of technology announced back in 2018.1 finally come of age, losing their preview tag and now considered appropriate for use in production environments.  These technologies include:

  • Light Weight Render Pipeline (LWRP)
  • Burst Compiler
  • Shader Graph

Unfortunately the HDRP isn’t quite ready for production use, but it did receive several new features in this release as well.  Additionally there were several new or improved packaged in both experimental and preview formats including GPU lightmapping, new DOTS based rigging, DOTS based physics, DOTS based audio and much more.

Oh… and the Linux editor is now out of experimental and is now considered preview.

You can learn a great deal more about this release on the Unity Blog, or read the full release notes available here.  Or you can watch our hands-on video available below.  Unity 2019.1 is available for download right now via the Unity Hub.  The Linux preview is available for download here in AppImage format.

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