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10. May 2014

 

First off, sorry for the horrible pun… I wont do it again… at least not today.

 

That said, Unreal may have just flipped the industry on it’s head… or may have just dropped a cleaver marketing gimmick.  By now you have probably heard that Unreal Tournament development will be done in the open.  At least for Unreal Engine subscribers it will be.  Basically if you subscribe to Unreal Engine for 19$ a month, you get Unreal Tournament for free.  The biggest part of the announcement is you get access to a Github repository, so you can watch the game develop, or perhaps even get involved!

 

In Unreal’s own words:

 

HERE’S THE PLAN:
  • We’ve created a small team of UT veterans that are beginning work on the project starting today.
  • From the very first line of code, the very first art created and design decision made, development will happen in the open, as a collaboration between Epic, UT fans and UE4 developers. We’ll be using forums for discussion, and Twitch streams for regular updates.
  • If you are a fan and you want to participate, create a free account and join the forum discussion.
  • All code and content will be available live to UE4 developers on GitHub.
  • The game will be true to its roots as a competitive FPS.
  • Development will be focused on Windows, Mac and Linux.

 

SO WHAT’S THE CATCH?
  • It will take many months until the game is playable by gamers. This is real development from scratch.
  • When the game is playable, it will be free. Not free to play, just free.
  • We’ll eventually create a marketplace where developers, modders, artists and gamers can give away, buy and sell mods and content. Earnings from the marketplace will be split between the mod/content developer, and Epic.  That’s how we plan to pay for the game.

 

So why do I find this move so impressive?  There are a couple reasons…

 

First I was wondering if I would maintain my subscription.  If I am not actively developing in Unreal Engine, was there any point in paying 19$ a month?  I, and many others, wondered if Unreal would keep a stream of content coming that would keep developers paying.  To actively open up a potentially AAA game’s development process is certainly a good hook to keep me watching.  ( Plus, they’ve done a pretty good job keeping the content coming… more on that in a second ).

 

Second, quasi-open sourcing a game could be a brilliant strategy.  Indie developers get to contribute to a large project, probably beyond the scope of what they would otherwise be able to participate in.  Unreal of course gets a ton of free development effort, but retains dictatorial control that large scope games need.  Of course they will have to be selective about what they commit to their main trunk and may bruise some egos, so this could be a bit of a balancing act and will require additional resources on their end, but the trade-offs are probably worth it.  I would generally think this would be mostly a read only process, basically just Unreal developing a game and the community watching.  However they have recently accepted a number of community fixes into the Unreal engine base, so I don’t think this is just marketing.  If nothing else, many indie game developers get the opportunity to eavesdrop on a AAA game’s development, including developer discussions and twitch streams, for a price tag of 19$ a month.

 

The Unreal Tournament github repository is now online:

image

Of course, this is a from scratch project, so have very little expectations for now!

 

 

Finally and perhaps most disruptively “create a marketplace where developers, modders, artists and gamers can give away, buy and sell mods and content. Earnings from the marketplace will be split between the mod/content developer, and Epic”.  This point is MASSIVE.  Basically Unreal are releasing a F2P title where the microtransactions come from the community.  This is a powerful concept, enabling artists and coders to actually get paid for their work, using the exact same tools and process as the parent.  Just as artists and programmers can make a living providing assets to the Unity store, in the future, they will potentially make a living contributing to a game.  A game they potentially helped create.

 

 

Oh, remember earlier where I said Unreal would have to keep a pretty steady stream of updates to keep people subscribed?  Well, impressively enough, they have been.  Since the 1.1 patch ( adding XBox One and PS4 support ) there have been a half dozen new tutorials added, covering topics such as Localization, skeletal meshes and Blueprint complexity management.  Additionally they added a SciFi hallways level:

SciFi Screenshot 1

 

The marketplace is quickly being populated with professional quality examples to work from.  You can read more about the design process here.

 

I have to say Unreal are impressing the hell out of me.  They are taking bold risks and truly are throwing their resources at this, it’s not some half assed indie release like CryEngine or prior UDK releases… this is a slick well supported product and most importantly a thriving community.  Unreal are willing to try some very disruptive strategies and we should applaud them for it.

 

I for one will be keeping my 19$ a month subscription going.

 

Oh yeah, and on that topic, they’ve also laid out a blueprint ( ugh, bad accidental pun! ) for future Unreal development.  You can check it out here on Trello.  This transparency is certainly a good thing.  You can also vote and comment on features that are most important to you, a nice feedback loop with subscribers.

News Programming


25. April 2014

 

As the title said, Unreal Engine 4.1 has been released.  The biggest new is probably PS4/Xbox One support, but to most developers the additional resources and in engine tutorials are probably a bigger deal.  The impressive part is the volume of the release.  If Unreal keep updating at this pace, all the other game engines really do need to be afraid!  I have to imagine it will slow down a bit as I am guessing a lot of this content simply didn’t make the 4.0 cut.

 

Anyways, here are the release notes:

 

4.1 Release Notes

UNREAL ENGINE 4.1 RELEASE NOTES

Ray Davis on Apr 24, 2014 | Community News
MAJOR NEW FEATURES

Platforms

PlayStation 4 and Xbox One Support

  • Full support for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One!

Console

  • Engine source for Playstation 4 and Xbox One is available to subscribers who are registered developers with Microsoft or Sony, respectively.
  • For now, deploying projects to Playstation 4 or Xbox One requires compiling source from GitHub using a Windows computer

SteamOS/Linux Support (Preview)

  • You can now package your games and deploy to SteamOS and Linux!

Linux steam approved

  • For now, deploying projects to Linux requires compiling source from GitHub using a Windows computer.

Marketplace Content

Elemental Demo (Coming Later Today)

  • Remember that cool Unreal Demo we showed running on PlayStation 4? Elemental is a spectacular showcase of Unreal Engine 4’s high-end rendering capabilities, including dynamic lighting and shadowing real-time reflections, subsurface scattering and GPU powered particle effects.

elemental

Math Hall, a new Content Example level

  • The Math Hall example provides an introduction to basic vector math and the concept behind various math functions.

content examples

New Project Templates

Flying Template and Rolling Template

  • We’ve created two new project templates that demonstrate simple flying and rolling character movement.
  • The Flying template (C++ and Blueprint) feature simple flying movement:

FLying machin

  • The Rolling template (C++ and Blueprint) feature a physics-based rolling ball as the player character:

Rolling

Editor and Tools

New Built-in Editor Tutorials

  • We’ve added new built-in in-editor tutorials.  They’ll appear automatically the first time you encounter these features.
    tutorial image
  • Cascade Particle Editor Tutorial walks you through the basic user interface and concepts used when creating Particle Systems and effects.
  • Material Editor Tutorial explains the basics of creating Materials.
  • Static Mesh Editor Tutorial covers the interface and tools available for setting up Static Meshes.
  • Persona Animation Editor Tutorial walks you through the various user interface elements and concepts for the different asset types and modes.

Scene Outliner Folder System

  • You can now organize your actors into folders in the Scene Outliner.

sceen outliner

  • The create button will create you a new folder containing the currently selected actors.
  • Visibility toggling on folders affects all their contained actors.

Editor News Feed

  • The editor now has a built-in News Feed. You can access it using the new button in the top-right of the editor.
  • The News Feed will tell you about new Marketplace content, video tutorials and blog posts.

Editor News feed

Asset Deletion Assistant

  • This feature makes it easy to delete assets by helping you interactively inspect and repair references.

asset delete

  • Allows graceful cleanup of assets still being referenced on disk or in memory
    • You can click on any referenced asset to navigate to it and fix it up manually.
    • You can Replace References, formally known as “Consolidate”. 
    • You can perform a Force Delete, or you can Cancel and go handle the references yourself.
  • Allows for multiple simultaneous deletes.
    • Even if an asset is referenced by other assets, as long as they are also being deleted, it won’t flag that as a problem.
  • Reference Navigation
    • Double Clicking on referenced assets will open their editor
    • If an asset is being referenced in the open map, Double Clicking the map asset will take you to it in the open map.

Drag and Drop Directory Importing

  • You can now select multiple folders with textures, meshes and animations, and drag them directly into the Content Browser to import everything inside those folders.

Drag and drop

Undo History Window

  • The Editor now has a way to access the undo history.

undo history

  • You can access the Undo History window from the Windows menu (Windows > Undo History).    

New: Remapping Viewport Controls

  • We now allow users to remap their WASD controls for the viewport.
  • You can find these settings under Editor Preferences > Keyboards Settings > Viewport Navigation.

remapping viewport

New: Debug Histogram Visualization

  • You can now draw a histogram (graph) of float values in the world.

debug histogram

  • You can record the value of a property or other aspect of the game over time and visualize that as a histogram at a specific location in the world.
  • Values can be recorded and histograms can be drawn from both C++ code and Blueprints.

Histogram

  • Note: This feature is designed for debugging purposes. Debug drawing is not recommended during normal gameplay.

Translation Editor (Preview)

  • The Translation Editor makes it easier to edit translations for strings in your game code and assets.  

translation Editor

  • Note:  This tool is still an early work in progress.  This tool can be enabled in your editor preferences under the Experimental section.

Blueprints

Jump to Connection in Graph

  • You can now right click on pins and jump to connections.

Jump Connections

Class Dynamic Casting

  • You can now safely convert between compatible types of objects in your Blueprints.

Description: DynamicCasting.png

Improved Blueprint Components Editing

  • You can now drag-and-drop component nodes between Blueprint editor windows.
    • This will create a new component variable in the new Blueprint that inherits its attributes from the original (except variable name, to avoid conflicts.
  • You can now undo/redo component attachment and detachment operations.
    • This works for the “Make New Scene Root” operation as well

 

You can read the original release notes here.

News


21. April 2014

 

Comprehending any large code base is never a simple factor.  This is especially true of C++ with hits heavily used (and abused) typedef system.  The Unreal Engine has a very well defined and consistent naming convention but trying to crack it can take a bit of effort, as it’s explained piecemeal throughout the documentation. RosettaStone That is, until I found the Coding Standard document, which frankly is the very first page a C++ programmer working with UE4 should start with.  This document is the titular Rosetta Stone, the method that makes reading UE code possible.

 

Understanding their naming conventions will help you a great deal when trying to work through code samples.  A few of their choices strike me as a bit unusual, especially if you were raised on Hungarian like I was.  Here are the naming convention:

  • The first letter of each word in a name (e.g. type or variable) is capitalized, and there is usually no underscore between words. For example, Health and UPrimitiveComponent, but not lastMouseCoordinates or delta_coordinates.

  • Type names are prefixed with an additional upper-case letter to distinguish them from variable names. For example, FSkin is a type name, and Skin is an instance of a FSkin.

    • Template classes are prefixed by T.

    • Classes that inherit from UObject are prefixed by U.

    • Classes that inherit from AActor are prefixed by A.

    • Classes that inherit from SWidget are prefixed by S.

    • Classes that are abstract interfaces are prefixed by I.

    • Most other classes are prefixed by F, though some subsystems use other letters.

  • Type and variable names are nouns.

  • Method names are verbs that describe the method's effect, or describe the return value of a method that has no effect.

Variable, method, and class names should be clear, unambiguous, and descriptive. The greater the scope of the name, the greater the importance of a good, descriptive name. Avoid over-abbreviation.

All variables should be declared one at time so that a comment on the meaning of the variable can be provided. Also, the JavaDocs style requires it. You can use multi-line or single line comments before a variable, and the blank line is optional for grouping variables.

All functions that return a bool should ask a true/false question, such as "IsVisible()", or "ShouldClearBuffer()". All boolean variables must be prefixed with a "b" character (e.g. "bPendingDestruction", or "bHasFadedIn").

A procedure (a function with no return value) should use a strong verb followed by an object. An exception is if the object of the method is the object it is in; then the object is understood from context. Names to avoid include those beginning with "Handle" and "Process"; the verbs are ambiguous.

Though not required, we encourage you to prefix function parameter names with "Out" if they are passed by reference and the function is expected to write to that value. This makes it obvious that the value passed in this argument will be replaced by the function.

 

This explains all the AClass and UProperty you will encounter through out the code, and explains the far to common FSomethings you see in the code..

 

There are a few things I find unwieldy about these choices.  First, I am so used to instances starting with lower case that this seems like Anathema to me.  Second, if you are going to prefix with all capital letters, why not BBoolValue instead of bBoolValue, this seems inconsitent to me.  Next, why F for types? Finally why SWidget and S instead of Widget and W?  WButton makes a ton more sense than SButton for example.

 

At the end of the day it doesn’t really matter, the most important thing is to be consistent, which they have.  Now with a thorough understanding of their naming convention, groking the code is a heck of a lot easier.

 

Also of great important are the C++ type usage guidelines.  This is both a power and flaw of working with C++, there are more types than grains of sand in the desert, so knowing which to use is critical.

 

Portable Aliases for Basic C++ Types

  • bool for boolean values (NEVER assume the size of bool). BOOL will not compile.

  • TCHAR for a character (NEVER assume the size of TCHAR)

  • uint8 for unsigned bytes (1 byte)

  • int8 for signed bytes (1 byte)

  • uint16 for unsigned "shorts" (2 bytes)

  • int16 for signed "shorts" (2 bytes)

  • uint32 for unsigned ints (4 bytes)

  • int32 for signed ints (4 bytes)

  • uint64 for unsigned "quad words" (8 bytes)

  • int64 for signed "quad words" (8 bytes)

  • float for single precision floating point (4 bytes)

  • double for double precision floating point (8 bytes)

  • PTRINT for an integer that may hold a pointer (NEVER assume the size of PTRINT)

Don't use the C++ int type in portable code, since it's dependent on the compiler how large it is.

 

So if you are just starting out with C++ programming in Unreal, start here, it will make the journey a lot easier.

 

Finally C++ 11 guidelines are also important.  C++11 support across compilers is by no means universal but many of the features of C++11 are pretty damned useful.  Keep in mind, these guidelines are for Unreal staff working on the engine, not the end user working with the engine, so if you are say… only using Visual C++ 13, then feel free to use whatever features you want.  If you want to target as many platforms as possible though, you should be mindful of these instructions:

 

C++ 11 and Modern Language Syntax

Unreal Engine is built to be massively portable to many C++ compilers, so we're careful to use features that are compatible with the compilers we can imagine supporting. Sometimes features are so useful that we'll wrap them up in macros and use them pervasively (such as the 'override' keyword), but usually we'll wait until all of the compilers we could imagine supporting are up to the latest standard.

We are utilizing certain C++ 11 language features that appear to be well-supported across modern compilers, such as the "auto" keyword, range-based-for and lambdas. In some cases we're able to wrap up usage of these features in preprocessor conditionals (such as rvalue references in containers.) However, certain language features we may opt to avoid entirely until we're confident we won't be surprised by a new platform appearing that cannot digest the syntax.

Unless specified below as a modern C++ compiler feature we are supporting, you should refrain from using compiler-specific language features unless they are wrapped in preprocessor macros or conditionals and used sparingly.

The 'auto' Keyword

The 'auto' keyword is supported by all compilers UE4 targets and you are encouraged to use it in your code where it makes sense to do so.

Remember you can and should use const, & or * with auto just like you would with the type name. With auto, this will coerce the inferred type to be what you want.

We encourage use of the auto keyword for iterator loops (eliminates boilerplate), and also when you are initializing a variable to a new instance (eliminates redundant type name.) Some of the other uses are more contentious, but feel free to use it however you want for now and we can learn and improve best practices as we go.

Tip: If you hover over a variable in Visual Studio, it will usually tell you the inferred type.

Range Based For

This is allowed in all engine and editor code and encouraged where it can help to keep the code easier to understand and more maintainable.

Lambdas and Anonymous Functions

Lambdas are now allowed, however we are cautious about use of stateful lambdas that capture stack variables -- we're still learning about where those are appropriate. Also, stateful lambdas cannot be assigned to function pointers which we tend to use a lot. We expect to update this documentation in the future as we establish best practices.

 

So, basically ranged based for loops, stateless lambdas good, stateful lambda bad and auto is a maybe.  For the remaining features that aren’t cross platform like override, they’ve provided preprocessor conditionals to work with them.  I really wish they listed them all here though.

Programming


8. April 2014

 

Unreal shook the indie game developer world up recently when they announced they made Unreal Engine 4, with complete source code, available for $19/month as well as a 5% royalty.  I assume some of you are wondering what your 20 bucks a month gets you.  Well this post is intended as an overview of what is included in Unreal to help you decide if you will take the plunge.  By no means is it intended as a review, although I will make a few comments about quality where applicable.  Alright, lets jump right in!

 

Welcome to the Unreal Portal/Getting Started

 

Once you’ve signed up, entered and confirmed your credit card information, you will now be able to access the Unreal Engine portal.  This is where you can go about downloading Unreal Engine and access the community, wiki, source code and documentation, more on that later.

image

 

Click the download link to the right to download the downloader.  This initital download is quite small but that’s only just the beginning.  Now the proper download begins.

Unreal2

 

The initial download is about 7GB, the first patch was 4GB.  Fortunately download speeds are great, even on day 1 I got enough bandwidth to max on out 50MB connection.

 

Each time you launch UE4, you will be prompted for credentials.  ( Haven’t used Offline mode yet, so you shouldn’t require an online connection like CryEngine ).

image

 

Then once again back to the launcher.  This is a combination of news, community portal, marketplace and quick launch.

image

Coincidentally, in Windows 8.1, for some reason none of the news links actually work for me.  You can see down the left hand side there are a number of projects listed under My Content.  Most of these are actually freely available templates you can get from the marketplace.  Each of these is a one level game demonstrating a different concept, be it 2D, 3D, Blueprints, C++ coding, etc.  They range in size between 20MB and 800MB.  They are found in the marketplace:

 

image

 

There’s tons of high quality starter content here and right now almost the entire thing is free.  However, you can see the beginnings of a Unity style marketplace is planned if you look under the coming soon section, you can see a gun based asset pack that is going to be for sale:

image

 

Hopefully this is opened up to the community and becomes a viable competitor to Unity’s Asset Store.  Now let’s fire up the main editor.  See that big yellow LAUNCH button, yeah, that’s how.  I’ll open it up with the Strategy Game template, on of the more complex samples.

 

The Main Editor

 

This is where the magic happens and in a word, it’s polished.

image

 

Perhaps most impressive, notice the Play button in the top toolbar. at any time you can actually hit this and run your game directly in the editor instantly.

 

One word of warning here.  You level is basically running as a game in your engine at all times.  For most people this isn’t going to be a big deal, but to people like myself who develop on the go using a laptop it can be crippling if you arent near a plug.  The Unreal Engine is an absolute battery killer.  On my Windows laptop I can generally run Unity for 3 or 4 hours on battery, a bit longer if I try to stretch it out.  Unreal Engine on the other hand…

 

image

 

Ouch.  My 2013 Macbook Air faired even worse.  It went from fully charged to dead in just over 30 minutes.

 

That leads to an interesting question… how is performance, what kind of system do you need to use Unreal Engine?

 

Well the good news is you don’t need a ton of power, the tools actually ran on the Macbook Air, a 2013 Intel HD4000 GPU powered machine.  That said the experience certainly wasn’t ideal.  In all honesty, if that was my primary machine I would look elsewhere for an engine.  However on my primary Windows box, a Razer Razerblade 14” laptop ( i7, 8GB, nVidia 765m ) the performance is great, except of course the battery drain that is.

 

The editor itself is mostly for content placement, but there is a ton of power packed away.  Most tasks open up a dedicated editor of their own.  It keeps things uncluttered, but isn’t very alt + tab friendly for some reason.

 

Placing content is mostly a matter of drag and drop from the content browser to the scene.  Speaking of Content Browser, here it is:

image

Makes it easy to logically organize all your various game assets.

 

On the right hand side of the editor is the context sensitive details panel as well as a searchable scene graph.

image

 

For level editing, UnrealEd has it’s roots as a CSG ( Constructive Solid Geometry ) editor and that functionality is still there.  Basically CSG modeling works by creating complex shapes by adding and subtracting simple shapes, here for example is a box cut from another box in the editor:

image

These days however, CSG modeling is rarely used, but can be used to quickly prototype a level.

 

Of course there is a height mapped landscape editor built in:

image

You can push/pull the landscape to manipulate it, use brushes to quickly instance geometry and texture the landscape.  OF course you can still drag/drop from the Content Browser to a landscape you’ve generated.

 

This of course only scratches the surface of what the Editor can do.  You can also define lighting, environmental effects, Nav mesh volumes, etc.

image

 

The Editor itself could no doubt fill a book, or perhaps many, but Unreal have done a very good job of compartmentalizing the details.  Until you need something, it’s mostly out of your way, and if you’ve worked in Unity or any 3D applications, it should become pretty quickly intuitive to you.  One thing I really don’t like however is the hold control to do model.  So for example, if you want to paint the geometry, you need to hold down the Ctrl button while left clicking.  It is counterintuitive to me.

 

Remember how I said earlier that the editor is composed of a number of different windows.  One such window is for editing Blueprints.   Let’s take a look at that next.

 

Blueprints

 

So, what exactly are blueprints?  Well if you’ve used prior Unreal engines, it is the replacement for Kismet.  If you are completely new to Unreal, think of Blueprints like a visual programming language.  It works a lot like the graphing functionality in most 3D applications.  Don’t dismiss Blueprints early either, they are surprisingly capable.  Many of the sample games you can download are implemented entirely in Blueprints.

 

Blueprints can be accessed with the Blueprints button in the main interface:

image

 

Each level can have a Blueprint that responds to a variety of events or you can create Class Blueprints, which are basically exactly like C++ classes, except they are implemented as Blueprints.

 

Blueprints open as a completely separate window, like so:

image

 

Blueprints can be complex beasts.  Here for example is the Blueprint for controlling the character from the blueprint example:

image

 

One annoyance I have is the lack of zoom granularity control.  Zooming to fit just what you want on the screen can be a chore as you under/over-zoom due to the lack of granularity.

 

Think of Blueprints like massive flow charts that control, well, just about everything in your game.  Most classes and their properties in the game are exposed as Blueprints and you have a large library of functionality available to you.

image

 

This post is starting to get a bit long so I am going to split it into two parts.  In Part Two we look at the C++ programming side of the fence, explore the documentation available, take a look at the source and the community available.

 

On to part two.

Programming


8. April 2014

 

One of the vaunted features of Unreal Engine 4 is C++ support.  How exactly does that work?  First you need to have an external IDE installed, either Visual C++ on Windows or XCode on Mac.  The Express version will work but the helper toolbar is unavailable.  It’s mostly just a shortcut so it’s not a huge loss.  Integration is pretty solid.  In the Editor in the File menu there are a number of menu options:

 

C++ Coding

 

image

 

By selecting Add Code to Project… you can easily create a new game object using a wizard like sequence.  You select the base class:

 

image

 

Name it and you are done:

image

 

Once you click Create Class, you will be prompted to edit the code:

image

 

You will be brought to your IDE of choice.  From this point on, its just like working with any other Visual Studio or XCode C++ project.

image

 

The result of your project is a DLL file, build as per normal and your game will update in the editor.  It’s only when adding ( like we just did ) a new class do you need to restart the Unreal Engine Editor.  Otherwise a simple refresh should suffice.

 

The actual C++ libraries are fairly massive and far beyond the scope of this brief overview.

 

Building Unreal Engine from Source

 

One of the big advantages of Unreal is you have complete access to the source code.  The code is available in multiple parts, a couple of zip files with most of the external dependencies then the remaining code is available of Github.  You have to associate your Github account with your Unreal account, but the process is basically instant.

 

The GitHub repository is about what you would expect.

image

 

The actual source isn’t that big, about 120MB, while the supporting zips measure in at a couple GB, but they shouldn’t regularly change.  Unreal make a bleeding edge release available for the brave of heart.

 

The actual process is about as simple as it gets.  You do a git pull, download and extract the supporting files into the same directory, then run a script that generates the project or solution file.  Then, in the case of Windows, simply open the SLN file in Visual Studio:

 

As you can see, the solution contains full sources for every tool in the SDK:

image

 

This is nice, when they say with source code, it’s the ENTIRE source, nothing is hidden from you.  On the other hand, have some patience, the build process isn’t exactly fast.  On my machine it took about half an hour, I cant even imagine how long it would take on the MacBook Air, probably a couple of hours.  Then again, I remember the bad old days of all day builds, so this is really a first world problem.

 

Have a fair bit of drive space available too, as building from source is going to require a fair bit of space:

image

 

I’ve only scanned the code but from what I’ve seen it’s pretty clean and well commented.  For the majority of devs, you probably wont ever need to modify the code, but being able to run it in debug mode is certainly invaluable.

 

 

The Documentation

 

A project like this lives of dies on it’s documentation and I am please to say Unreal Engine is well documented.

 

First there are a series of video tutorials.  Even without a membership you can check them out.  As of right now there are 64 video tutorials available.

The documentation is broken down like so:

image

 

Under the Samples & Tutorials some are currently just placeholders.

image

 

The Programming Guide is pretty comprehensive.

image

 

Reference documentation is again detailed:

image

 

They also provide the AnswerHub, a StackOverflow like portal for asking and answering questions.    As you can see from the screenshot below, answers come very quickly and devs are very active in solving problems.  If you run into a problem, you are very well supported:

image

 

In addition to AnswerHub, there is also a full Wiki:

image

Currently it is a bit sparse, but expect it to grow over time.

 

Finally there are the forums.  One of the nice things about having to pay to be a member is it gets the signal to noise ratio way down.  This means the only people on the forums are people that are using or evaluating Unreal Engine.

image

 

The forums are also very active and developers actively participate.

 

Summary

 

This of course only scratches the surface of the functionality available.  There shader support, skeletal systems, etc… all nicely integrated in the editor.  What I will say is I am actually shocked at the level of polish of not only the Engine and supporting tools, but also the community they have fostered and the level of support they are providing.

 

When I first downloaded UDK I was actually somewhat underwhelmed with what was included.  Level level of polish present in UE4 shows they are taking this release very seriously.  Don’t get me wrong, UE is NOT a beginner friendly product, this is some seriously powerful but also sophisticated tech you are being given here.  That said, Unreal have done an amazing job making it as accessible and well supported as I could have imagined.

 

Is it worth 19$ a month?  Most certainly, if only just for the learning experience it represents.

Programming


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