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18. October 2018


Meshroom is a new, free and open source photogrammetry software from AliceVision.  Photogrammetry software enable you to create a 3D scene using a series of photographs, generally the more the merrier.  Currently documentation is a bit lacking, so I’ve decided to create this quick tutorial.  In this tutorial we are going to quickly walk through the process of using Meshroom using a photoset available here.  That post links to a zip file containing 50 images that are confirmed to work with Meshroom.  Simply extract them somewhere on your drive.  Of course you need to download Meshroom, which is available for download right here.  Simply download the archive, extract then execute the Meshroom application.  Note Meshroom requires a CUDA GPU and works on Windows and Linux!  So this process will only work on nVidia GPUs, at least as of time of writing.


Once you’ve got Meshroom loaded, follow the following simple steps.

Drag extracted images into the Images pane on the left.

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Save your project somewhere

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Click the green Start button.

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As it’s running, you will see the progress across the top:

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This bar indicates a problem occurred.  You can divine more details by locating the current task in the Graph, like so:

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With the node selected, check the Log (bottom right corner) for details.  This is the error message you receive if you run the process on a non-CUDA (nVidia) GPU.  Keep in mind, it can also be caused by the process running on a laptop with Optimus, not automatically selecting the right GPU.

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Hopefully however you encounter no such errors and the process is entirely green.  On the bright side, it should pick right up where the error occured if you run the project again in the same directory, as Meshroom caches the results of each step as it goes.  You will find the vast majority of time is spent on the DepthMap section,  this is normal.  As the process continues, you should start seeing results in the 3D viewer.

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You can pan, zoom and orbit the mouse using the LMB, scroll wheel and MMB respectively.  More detail in the point cloud will fill in as the process runs.  Once it completes successfully, you will see a button Load Model.

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You can now preview the results of your effort!

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A few steps in, it will have evaluated all of your photos, acceptable/usable photos will be marked with a green checkmark.

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Review the remaining photos for flaws and inconsistency if you run it again.

Go make some tea… it’s going to be between 10 minutes and an hour depend on the speed of your machine.  Once the process is complete, there will be a folder called MeshroomCache, with the following contents:

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This is a folder with all of the output files from each step in the process.  Generally what you are going to be interested in is the obj, mtl and texture file in the Texturing folder.  This can be imported into your 3D modelling application of choice, the obj format is fairly universal.  The resulting mesh is extremely dense and you may consider checking out Instant Meshes for optimizing the results.


Now that you know it works, it’s time to start refining the process or providing your own picture set.  I would recommend the following tips from my own experience:

  • use an actual camera, not a phone.  I got terrible results from my Pixel phone, but my Canon DLSR gave much better results.  YMMV
  • DO NOT green/white screen your background.  Unique markers in the background help Meshroom position each virtual camera
  • try to get the entire object in frame on each shot
  • get rid of any image with any blurring

So far we just default settings in the Graph Editor.  This graph represents a graph of nodes in the process, one for each directory shown in the screenshot above.  Note when you select a node, there are a number of properties you can edit:

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You can also connect pins to multiple nodes to create multiple results.  For example, if you wanted to create a set of TFF and lower resolution PNG textures, you can do the following.  Right click the graph editor and select Texturing:

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This will create a new node in the graph.  Now drag the output node from MeshFiltering and connect it to ini and inputMesh.

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Select the new Texturing node and have it create a lower detail texture set:

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Now when it runs, it will create two sets of textures for you.  Note there are other nodes such as Decimation that aren’t in the process by default.  You can see the entire thing in process in the video attached below:

Art


14. August 2018


Are you looking to learn how to use Unreal Engine?  If so, today Epic just launched their new online academy, which is home to all of their existing video tutorials, as well as several new videos, organized into courses by industry or job position.  Current courses are split into the following tracks:

  • Game Development
  • Architecture
  • Industrial Design
  • Media and Entertainment

Details of the new course from the Unreal Engine blog:

Additional tracks sort content by job roles like Designer or Programmer, and each series is labeled with levels from Getting Started to Master Level. Videos are available on demand, and series are broken into short chunks for convenient learning anytime, anywhere.

This new platform includes a lot of the great video content you’ve seen on our website in the past, plus dozens of new videos on common workflows, new features, and a whole lot more! The learning platform is open to everyone, and offered free of charge. More content will be added regularly.

You can access the Unreal Engine Online Learning platform through the Video Tutorials option under the Learn tab at the Unreal Engine website. Check out the videos and get started on your journey to mastering Unreal Engine!

You can access the courses by clicking the Vide Tutorials link in the Learning section of the Epic Game Launcher, or by going to the website academy.unrealengine.com.  Best of all, all of this content is completely free.

GameDev News


12. June 2018


If you’ve recently been to the GameFromScratch tutorial series page recently you may have noticed the addition of a new Armory game engine tutorial series.  It’s not actually hosted on GameFromScratch, instead it’s on our newly launched sister site (watch out, the paints still wet!) DevGa.me.  Don’t worry though, nothings changed, it’s just a newer, cleaner, ArmoryDevGame900x600mobile friendly home for tutorial series, I’ll explain more about this later.  For now, just be aware there is a new text and video based tutorial series on the Armory game engine under development!


Armory (or Armory3D) is a newly free open source cross platform game engine that runs inside and tightly integrates with the Blender application.  If you are interested in learning more about Armory and why I’m so excited about it, be sure to check out Introduction to Armory video.  The series is still quite young but already there is a fair bit to get you started.  Right now the series consists of:

The entire series homepage is available here.

Additionally the video series has begun, lagging slightly behind the text series.  So far videos consist of:

There is a (very small for now…) playlist available here.


DevGa.me is not a blog format and does not have any news, it’s just home to tutorials.  I will however announce new tutorials here on GameFromScratch, so stay tuned!  If you want to discuss the new series, there is a conversation over on the Armory discussion forums or leave a comment below or on YouTube.

Programming Art


11. June 2018


Just finished adding another tutorial to the ongoing Godot 3 tutorial series, Sound Fx and Music.  This tutorial covers a ton of topics around audio:

  • Playing audio using AudioStreamPlayer
  • Positional audio using AudioStreamPlayer2D
  • Importing and loading audio files, WAV and Ogg
  • Using the Audio Bus
  • Creating special effects such as panning, reverb and chorus
  • Managing volume
  • Using sound with Area2D


The series homepage is available here.

Programming


12. February 2018


Today Unity have released a very high quality and full featured 2D Game Kit, available here.  The kit is a combination of 2D platformer game with multiple levels, a loading screen etc.  It has been designed in such a way that much of the game content can be customized and configured without ever having to write a single line of code.  Additionally there is a step by step tutorial series as well as comprehensive reference material that show you how to create your own 2D game using the game kit.  The kit is available completely free and can be downloaded from the asset store.


If you are interested in seeing the Unity 2D game kit in action be sure to check out this quick video, which is also embedded below.


Programming GameDev News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

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