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30. January 2016

 

Tiled, the open source map editor, just release a minor update in the form of 0.15.1.   This release added/fixed/changed the following features:

 

You can download Tiled here.

 

If you are interested in learning more about Tiled, we have a comprehensive tutorial series available here.

GameDev News


24. January 2016

 

Kode Studio 16.1 was just released, a fork of the Visual Studio Code editor specifically modified to work with the Kha library for Haxe.  Eventually Kode Studio should be useful as an IDE for general Haxe development... maybe, read on for more on this.

 

From the release notes:

The first public version of Kode Studio is out, Github hosts the downloads. Kode Studio is a fork of Visual Studio Code, optimized for Kha (Kore support will also be added). This is a very early version of Kode Studio but features debugging support which is in many ways superior to anything else currently around for Haxe based development, based on VSCode's Chrome debugger, Haxe's JavaScript target and a modified HTML5 target in Kha. It's cross-platform, very fast (runtime and compile time) and very convenient (no additional software required).

To get started with Kode Studio, just unzip the archive, start the executable and open a directory (File -> Open Folder) containing a Kha project - or open an empty folder and hit the "Init Kha Project" command (Press F1, type Kha, click it).
Kode Studio Create Kha Project

To debug open the debugging panel (the bottom icon on the very left) and click the green play button.
Kode Studio Debugging

Code completion will work after your first debugging session.

We hope you will enjoy developing in Kode Studio but as mentioned before, this is a very early release. Please tell us about any problems you encounter.

Oh and here are the answers to the questions everybody wants to ask:

Is the fork necessary? Couldn't it be an extension?
Currently it could be an extension for the most part, there are about 20 lines of code outside of extensions right now. But that is not were Kode Studio is headed. All functionality of Kit (Kha's previous GUI tool) will be integrated. The IDE will be tightly coupled to Kha's and Kore's build systems. Much of that can not be done in extensions. VSCode is a strong base but it's also a cage that has to be blast open to do Kha justice.

Is this a general Haxe IDE?
Right now - no. In the future - probably yes. But will it be a better Haxe IDE than VSCode plus the proper extensions? Probably not. The focus is clearly on Kha and Kore for Kode Studio. Every change done to the VSCode Haxe plugins that's not specific to Kha will end up in pull-requests for the original projects - namelyhttps://github.com/jcward/vscode-haxe andhttps://github.com/jcward/vscode-hxcpp-debug

GameDev News


13. January 2016

 

To be honest, I am shocked it took this long.  JetBrains have made an excellent Java IDE for ages.  Then they released IDEs for just about every single language out there, as well as the C# refactoring tool Resharper, but never a full blown C# IDE, until today that is.

Interestingly though, this isn’t running on a JVM like their others (IntelliJ, Webstorm, PHPStorm), instead:image

Project Rider is a standalone IDE built on the IntelliJ Platform, much like WebStorm, DataGrip and our other IDEs.

The difference however, is that instead of reimplementing ReSharper’s features on the IntellIJ Platform, which runs on the JVM, we’re using ReSharper in a headless mode, out of process, and communicating with it via a very fast custom binary protocol. As such, the backend continues to be ReSharper written in C# running on .NET or Mono, and the frontend is written in Kotlin, talking to the IntelliJ Platform’s APIs.

 

And you may ask, why create a C# IDE with Visual Studio and Xamarin filling the need?

Well you kept asking us, so we finally got around to doing it!

Jokes aside though, our main reason is to provide choice. We believe that we can provide a great user experience for developers that might be interested in using alternative environments.

So why now? Because we believe it is the right time due to several factors:

  • We’ve been working for several years in allowing ReSharper to work in different environments, independently of Visual Studio. An example of this is dotPeek.
  • It’s quite clear that there’s an ever increasing tendency of developers using non-Windows platforms, and we’d like to give them the same experience they’ve come to know and love with ReSharper.
  • Finally, Microsoft moving its platform and C# language towards Open Source, along with initiatives such as CoreCLR, have been an added incentive.

 

So, what timeframe are we looking at then?

We’re aiming to open a private EAP in the coming weeks, towards the end of February. We’ll announce the signup form here on the blog, as well as on Twitter.

Soon after the private EAP we’ll move to a public EAP. When this will happen very much depends on the feedback we get from the early testers. Our aim is to release sometime in Autumn 2016.

 

For more details on Project Rider, click herehttp://blog.jetbrains.com/dotnet/2016/01/13/project-rider-a-csharp-ide.

GameDev News


12. January 2016

 

Corona Labs, the makers of the popular Lua based mobile game engine, just release version 1.6 of Corona Editor.  Corona Editor is a light weight IDE built as a plugin for Sublime Text that enables debugging, code snippets, code completion and more.

Details of the 1.6 release from the blog announcement:

Corona Labs is happy to announce the availability of Corona Editor 1.6. This is an update for the add-on package for Sublime Text 2 and Sublime Text 3 that provides code completion, syntax highlighting, documentation, and debugging to Corona developers.

The release of 1.6 includes the following updates:

Debugger improvements
  • Fixed an issue with a hanging after pressing Shift+F10.
  • Fixed a bug with spaces in project pathnames.
  • Current status is now displayed in the “Console” pane.
  • The “Console” output is now cleaner.
  • Generally improved reliability.
Corona Editor Project improvements
  • On OS X, Corona EditorRun Project now uses the most recent daily build in the/Applications folder by default. It will fall back to the public build if there are no daily builds.
  • Removed project “build system.” The menu command Corona EditorRun Project or the Cmd+F10(Mac) Win+F10(Windows, maybe mapped to FN+F10) key sequence is much more reliable.
  • Added Clear Build Panel command to main menu and context menu.
Editing improvements
  • Fixed indentation of elseif blocks.
  • Latest code completions are up to date to daily build 2016.2803.

Learn more about Corona Editor.

GameDev News


11. January 2016

 

Today Paymentwall released an SDK for the popular game engine Unity that enables developers to accept payments directly within their application.  From the press release:

“We are very excited to release our Unity Integration to allow gamers to make in-game purchases in their local currency, and in their most preferred payment method,” said Jevin Tryon, Project Manager at Paymentwall. “As a result, game developers will be able to increase their revenue, and monetize their games all around the world, easily.

The ability to offer different payment methods and manage in-game purchases will allow developers to reach different markets worldwide and maximize their revenue. This is especially important as the global gaming market is expected to grow at a rate of 9.4% annually, and reach a revenue of 107 billion US dollars by 2017, according to the 2015 Global Games Market Report from Newzoo. Through the Paymentwall SDK, Unity will become the most wanted platform among game developers. In 2015, the number of developers using Unity reached a million, as compared to 60,000 developers in 2014, said Unity CEO John Riccitiello.

The Unity Editor comes with an array of tools for creating and enhancing graphics, animation, as well as 2D and 3D physics for games through effectors and colliders. Editor also supports C#, JavaScript, and Boo to help developers optimize user experience. To save time on game development and updates, Unity’s asset store offers ready-made plug-ins, models, extensions and services; which now includes Paymentwall SDK.

Developers will be able to level up the gaming experience through Paymentwall SDK. Their end-users can now pay for in-game purchases in a manner that is most convenient for them. The SDK also supports customization of the checkout page to reflect the look and feel of the game itself, contributing to a seamless user experience. Fraud protection and risk monitoring services are also part of it, to ensure safety for both end-users and developers in every transaction.

Unity checkout

Example of Paymentwall’s one-click checkout page for Unity

Unity developers will be able to increase their revenue with Paymentwall SDK, while providing their users a better experience within their games. The creation of Paymentwall SDK for Unity makes the game development platform an all-in-one solution for both new and existing developers that seek to earn money from their games.

This is actually different than the myriad of In App Purchase plugins out there, as ultimately IAP make use of the underlying store (Steam, Google Play Store or Apple Store) for processing the payment, while in this case PaymentWall is the processor.  I would actually be somewhat shocked if Apple would allow this past their terms and conditions given their previous attitude towards transactions done on the AppStore (AKA, they want a 30% cut of everything, from app sales to Netflix subscriptions or Amazon purchases).  In fact, I am almost positive that neither Google nor Apple would allow you to use this SDK with their app store, making this desktop only.  I suppose this system could be effective for people directly selling a game they want to monetize in app purchases on.

 

Paymentwall started life in 2010 as a way for developers to monetize Facebook applications, until Facebook effectively shut out outside providers a year later.   The name seems a bit odd to me, as I had always associated the expression “Pay Wall” as derogatory.

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