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20. June 2012

 

This tutorial is going to cover creating transition effects between your GameEngine2D scenes.  It is actually going to be rather short and mostly code, as the subject is actually quite simple and consistent between different effects.

 

All right, lets just right in.  First of all, when need our main application.  This is going to perhaps be the simplest one we have created to date, and all of the code should be familiar to you by now.  Create a new file named AppMain.cs as follows:

 

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using Sce.Pss.Core; using Sce.Pss.Core.Environment; using Sce.Pss.Core.Graphics; using Sce.Pss.Core.Input; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base; namespace SceneTransitions { public class AppMain { public static void Main (string[] args) { Director.Initialize(); Scene1 scene1 = new Scene1(); Director.Instance.RunWithScene(scene1); } } }

 

All we are doing is Initializing the Director object, creating our custom scene of type Scene1 and telling it to run.  This literally is about the shortest PlayStation Mobile application you can create.

 

Now lets take a look at Scene1.cs

using System; using Sce.Pss.Core.Graphics; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base; namespace SceneTransitions { public class Scene1 : Scene { Texture2D texture; TextureInfo ti; public Scene1 () { this.Camera.SetViewFromViewport(); texture = new Texture2D("/Application/pic1.png",false); ti = new TextureInfo(texture); SpriteUV sprite = new SpriteUV(ti); sprite.Quad.S = ti.TextureSizef; sprite.Position = new Sce.Pss.Core.Vector2(0,0); this.AddChild(sprite); this.ScheduleUpdate(1); this.RegisterDisposeOnExitRecursive(); } ~Scene1 () { ti.Dispose(); texture.Dispose(); } public override void Update (float dt) { if((Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePad.GetData(0).ButtonsDown & Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) == Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) { if(Director.Instance.CurrentScene.IsRunning) Director.Instance.ReplaceScene(new Scene2()); } } } }

 

We are declaring a new class Scene1, which is derived from GameEngine2D.Scene. In this scene, in the constructor we are setting the camera to be sized to the viewport, creating a texture from our image pic1.png ( oh yeah, you need to add 3 images to your project, I picked three PS Vita wallpapers I downloaded off the net, you can use whatever files you want, but I assume you name them pic1.png pic2.png and pic3.png ) then create a sprite out of it.  This is all stuff we have done in prior tutorials.  We now add the sprite to our scene, and schedule this scene to receive updates.  Finally we call this.RegisterDisposeOnExitRecursive().  This function call is key, as it tells the Director to dispose of this scene when it is replaced.  If you do not call this, we will quickly run out of memory.

 

Next up is our destructor.  TextureInfo and Texture are both classes that you are expected to manage destruction of yourself ( they implement IDisposable ).  So in the destructor, which is called when our scene is replaced, we need to dispose of both of these items.  ( Actually I believe TextureInfo will take care of Texture2D, but don’t quote me on that ).

 

Next up is our Update() method.  As we have seen in the past, this method is called once every frame and is where your scene’s logic should be located.  In this case, we are waiting on the user hitting the Cross button ( or S key if using the simulator ), in which case we tell the Director to Replace the scene with a new created Scene2, which we will now create.

 

Create a file named Scene2.cs with the following code ( which is going to look extremely familiar… )

 

using System; using Sce.Pss.Core.Graphics; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base; namespace SceneTransitions { public class Scene2 : Scene { Texture2D texture; TextureInfo ti; public Scene2 () { this.Camera.SetViewFromViewport(); texture = new Texture2D("/Application/pic2.png",false); ti = new TextureInfo(texture); SpriteUV sprite = new SpriteUV(ti); sprite.Quad.S = ti.TextureSizef; sprite.Position = new Sce.Pss.Core.Vector2(0,0); this.AddChild(sprite); this.ScheduleUpdate(1); this.RegisterDisposeOnExitRecursive(); } ~Scene2() { ti.Dispose(); texture.Dispose(); } public override void Update (float dt) { if((Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePad.GetData(0).ButtonsDown & Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) == Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) { if(Director.Instance.CurrentScene.IsRunning) { Director.Instance.ReplaceScene( new TransitionCrossFade( new Scene3() ) { Duration = 4.0f, Tween = (x) => Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base.Math.PowEaseOut( x, 3.0f )} ); } } } } }

 

So, basically it’s a cut and paste job of Scene1, just with a different texture file, and a different looking replace scene call.  I will look closer at that in a second.  Notice too that here we are creating a Scene3 in our Update() call, lets go ahead and create it next.

 

Create Scene3.cs

 

using System; using Sce.Pss.Core.Graphics; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base; namespace SceneTransitions { public class Scene3 : Scene { Texture2D texture; TextureInfo ti; public Scene3 () { this.Camera.SetViewFromViewport(); texture = new Texture2D("/Application/pic3.png",false); ti = new TextureInfo(texture); SpriteUV sprite = new SpriteUV(ti); sprite.Quad.S = ti.TextureSizef; sprite.Position = new Sce.Pss.Core.Vector2(0,0); this.AddChild(sprite); this.ScheduleUpdate(1); this.RegisterDisposeOnExitRecursive(); } ~Scene3() { ti.Dispose(); texture.Dispose(); } public override void Update (float dt) { if((Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePad.GetData(0).ButtonsDown & Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) == Sce.Pss.Core.Input.GamePadButtons.Cross) { if(Director.Instance.CurrentScene.IsRunning) { Director.Instance.ReplaceScene( new TransitionSolidFade( new Scene1() ) { Duration = 1.0f, Tween = (x) => Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base.Math.PowEaseOut( x, 3.0f )} ); } } } } }

Again, another cut and paste job, with just the texture file name changed, and a different ReplaceScene() call, this time creating a Scene1, basically creating an infinite application that shows Scene1, then button press, shows Scene2, button press, shows Scene3, button press, shows Scene1, repeat over an over.

 

Now lets look at the key differences between how the transitions work:

 

Scene1:

Director.Instance.ReplaceScene(new Scene2());

Scene2:

Director.Instance.ReplaceScene( new TransitionCrossFade( new Scene3() ) { Duration = 4.0f, Tween = (x) => Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base.Math.PowEaseOut( x, 3.0f )} );

Scene3:

Director.Instance.ReplaceScene( new TransitionSolidFade( new Scene1() ) { Duration = 1.0f, Tween = (x) => Sce.Pss.HighLevel.GameEngine2D.Base.Math.PowEaseOut( x, 3.0f )} );

 

The transition from the first screen, does nothing, it simply transition to the next scene with no visual effect.  Your first image will simply be replaced with your second image.

 

Scene2 however, transitions by creating a new temporary scene, a TransitionCrossFade, which is essential a short lived scene that goes between Scene2 and Scene3 and causes a cross fade effect.  As you can see, we provide a Tween method which controls the rate at which the fade will occur.  A tween are not simply the people responsible for the bizarre success of the Twilight franchise, its actually short had for inbetween, which is essentially just a function that is going to be called over and over during a transition until it is completed.  Tweens are quite common in the animation world. 

 

Scene3 works almost identically to Scene2, but instead of a cross fade, it’s a solid fade.  You can see the difference in the video of this application in action.  There is one very important thing to be aware of here… these temporary scenes, TransitionCrossFade and TransitionSolidFade, if you try to replace them before they have completed running, your application will crash!  Truth is, in real life you won’t be switching scenes this quickly, so it should be a non-issue, but it is something you should be aware of.  If you want to witness this first hand, load this code up in the simulator and just repeatedly hit S, you will crash soon enough.

 

Now, let’s take a look at our code in action:

 

Transition between scenes on the PlayStation Vita Simulator

 

As always, you can download the full sources here.

Programming


13. June 2012

 

In this tutorial we are going to look at the various Gesture detectors built into the UI layer of the PlayStation Mobile SDK.  They all work fairly consistently, so this tutorial is going to be pretty light in explanation. 

 

There are 6 gesture detectors built in to the PS SDK; FlickGestureDetector, DragGestureDetector, TapGestureDetector, LongPressGestureDetector, PinchGestureDetector and DoubleTapGestureDetector.  DoubleTapGestureDetector barely works on the simulator and doesn’t work at all on the actual Vita, so we aren’t going to use it. 

 

Let’s just right in to coding, in this tutorial we are going to create an ImageBox UI widget that you can use with all these various GestureDetectors to flick, scale and drag all over the screen.  Here is the code:

 

using System; using System.Collections.Generic; using Sce.Pss.Core; using Sce.Pss.Core.Environment; using Sce.Pss.Core.Graphics; using Sce.Pss.Core.Input; using Sce.Pss.HighLevel.UI; namespace UIEffects { public class AppMain { private static GraphicsContext _graphics; private static ImageBox _imageBox; private static Label _label; private static FlickGestureDetector _flickGestureDetector; private static DragGestureDetector _dragGestureDetector; private static TapGestureDetector _tapGestureDector; private static LongPressGestureDetector _longPressGestureDetector; private static PinchGestureDetector _pinchGestureDetector; static private bool quit = false; private static float _origWidth; private static float _origHeight; private static float _origX; private static float _origY; // Note, no housecleaning, all event handlers leak! public static void Main(string[] args) { _graphics = new GraphicsContext(); UISystem.Initialize(_graphics); Sce.Pss.HighLevel.UI.Panel dialog = new Panel(); dialog.Width = _graphics.GetViewport().Width; dialog.Height = _graphics.GetViewport().Height; _label = new Label(); _label.Width = dialog.Width; _label.Height = 35; _label.Font = new Sce.Pss.Core.Imaging.Font(Sce.Pss.Core.Imaging.FontAlias.System,32,Sce.Pss.Core.Imaging.FontStyle.Regular); _label.SetPosition(0,0); _label.HorizontalAlignment = HorizontalAlignment.Center; _label.TextColor = new UIColor(0,0,0,255); _imageBox = new Sce.Pss.HighLevel.UI.ImageBox(); _imageBox.Image = new ImageAsset("/Application/image.png"); _imageBox.PivotType = PivotType.MiddleCenter; _imageBox.Width = _imageBox.Image.Width;///2; _imageBox.Height = _imageBox.Image.Height;///2; _imageBox.SetPosition(dialog.Width/2,//-_imageBox.Width/2, dialog.Height/2);///2-_imageBox.Height/2); _origWidth = _imageBox.Width; _origHeight = _imageBox.Height; _origX = _imageBox.X; _origY = _imageBox.Y; _flickGestureDetector = new FlickGestureDetector(); _flickGestureDetector.Direction = FlickDirection.Horizontal; _flickGestureDetector.FlickDetected += delegate(object sender, FlickEventArgs e) { if(e.Speed.X < 0) // Left new MoveEffect(_imageBox,800f,0f,_imageBox.Y,MoveEffectInterpolator.Elastic).Start (); else new MoveEffect(_imageBox,800f,dialog.Width,_imageBox.Y,MoveEffectInterpolator.Elastic).Start (); _label.Text = "Flicked"; }; _dragGestureDetector = new DragGestureDetector(); _dragGestureDetector.DragDetected += delegate(object sender, DragEventArgs e) { var newPos = new Vector2(e.Source.X,e.Source.Y) + e.Distance; e.Source.SetPosition(newPos.X,newPos.Y); _label.Text = "Dragged"; }; _tapGestureDector = new TapGestureDetector(); _tapGestureDector.TapDetected += delegate(object sender, TapEventArgs e) { e.Source.SetPosition(dialog.Width/2,dialog.Height/2); _label.Text = "Tapped"; }; _longPressGestureDetector = new LongPressGestureDetector(); _longPressGestureDetector.MinPressDuration = 3000f; _longPressGestureDetector.LongPressDetected += delegate(object sender, LongPressEventArgs e) { MessageDialog.CreateAndShow(MessageDialogStyle.Ok,"Press results", "Hey, let go of me! " + (e.ElapsedTime/1000).ToString() + " seconds elapsed!"); _label.Text = "Long pressed"; }; _pinchGestureDetector = new PinchGestureDetector(); _pinchGestureDetector.PinchDetected += delegate(object sender, PinchEventArgs e) { Vector2 newSize = new Vector2(e.Source.Width * e.Scale,e.Source.Height * e.Scale); e.Source.SetSize(newSize.X,newSize.Y); _label.Text = "Pinched"; }; _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_flickGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_dragGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_tapGestureDector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_longPressGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_pinchGestureDetector); dialog.AddChildLast(_imageBox); dialog.AddChildLast(_label); Sce.Pss.HighLevel.UI.Scene scene = new Sce.Pss.HighLevel.UI.Scene(); scene.RootWidget.AddChildLast(dialog); UISystem.SetScene(scene,new SlideTransition(2000.0f,FourWayDirection.Left,MoveTarget.NextScene,SlideTransitionInterpolator.Linear)); while(!quit) { _graphics.SetClearColor(255,255,255,0); _graphics.Clear(); if((GamePad.GetData(0).Buttons & GamePadButtons.Cross) == GamePadButtons.Cross) { //Reset _imageBox.SetSize(_origWidth,_origHeight); _imageBox.SetPosition(_origX,_origY); } if((GamePad.GetData(0).Buttons & GamePadButtons.Triangle) == GamePadButtons.Triangle) { quit = true; } UISystem.Update(Touch.GetData(0)); UISystem.Render(); _graphics.SwapBuffers(); } } } }

 

 

First we create our Graphics context and initialize our UISystem, then create a Panel named dialog that is going to be our active window.  We then create a label for output purposes, as well as an ImageBox that is going to contain our Jet sprite ( oh yeah… add an image to your project Smile I am reusing the Jet sprite from the last tutorial but you can use anything ).  The Image property of our ImageBox contains an ImageAsset, which we construct by simply passing it the filename of the graphic we want to use.  Next we store the original location of the _imageBox, so we can revert back to defaults later if desired.

 

The first gesture detector we are going to look at is the FlickGestureDetector.  This controls rapidly sliding your finger in one direction on the screen… think Angry birds.  The heart of the flick handling is the FlickDetected delegate, repeated here:

 

_flickGestureDetector.FlickDetected += delegate(object sender, FlickEventArgs e) { if(e.Speed.X < 0) // Left new MoveEffect(_imageBox,800f,0f,_imageBox.Y,MoveEffectInterpolator.Elastic).Start (); else new MoveEffect(_imageBox,800f,dialog.Width,_imageBox.Y,MoveEffectInterpolator.Elastic).Start (); _label.Text = "Flicked"; };

 

All we are doing here is detecting if the speed is a positive or negative value.  If it is a negative value, it means we are flicking right to left, otherwise it is left to right.  Obviously if you were interested in velocity, you would take the actual value into account.  We indicated with the line:

    _flickGestureDetector.Direction = FlickDirection.Horizontal;

that we are only interested in flicking along the horizontal axis.  Therefore any vertical flicks are going to be ignored. 

 

The direction simply determines what the Y coordinate is going to be in our MoveEffect call, either 0 ( far left ) or dialog.Width ( far right ).  MoveEffect causes the passed widget ( _imageBox ), to be moved over time (800ms in this case) to the passed coordinates.  The MoveEffectInterpolator determines how the move is going to happen, we choose Elastic which will cause it to have a bit of a spring effect.  For no effect at all, choose the Linear interpolator.  Essentially, if we flick left, we send the jet to the left side of the screen, while if we flick right, we send the jet to the right side of the screen.

 

Next up is the DragGestureDetector.  Dragging is when you tap, hold, then move the widget.  If we detect a drag, we simply want to translate our _imageBox location to the position the user dragged to.  We accomplish this with this code:

 

_dragGestureDetector = new DragGestureDetector(); _dragGestureDetector.DragDetected += delegate(object sender, DragEventArgs e) { var newPos = new Vector2(e.Source.X,e.Source.Y) + e.Distance; e.Source.SetPosition(newPos.X,newPos.Y); _label.Text = "Dragged"; };

 

As you can see, the various Gesture detectors use remarkably similar handlers.  In this case all we do is get the current position of the dragged widget ( the value in e.Source will be the widget being acted upon ) and add the distance it’s been dragged.

 

Now we add a TapGestureDetector.  In the event of a tap, we simply want to relocated the sprite back to the center of the screen.  Here is the code:

 

_tapGestureDector = new TapGestureDetector(); _tapGestureDector.TapDetected += delegate(object sender, TapEventArgs e) { e.Source.SetPosition(dialog.Width/2,dialog.Height/2); _label.Text = "Tapped"; };

 

Nothing really new there.  Again, e.Source represents the Widget object that is being tapped.  When a tap occurs we simply set it’s location to the center of the screen and log the tapped activity.

 

Next up is the LongPressGestureDetector.  A long press is a tap, followed by a hold for a given threshold of time, in our case 3000 milliseconds.  Once the long press occurs and hits the threshold, the delegate is fired.

 

_longPressGestureDetector = new LongPressGestureDetector(); _longPressGestureDetector.MinPressDuration = 3000f; _longPressGestureDetector.LongPressDetected += delegate(object sender, LongPressEventArgs e) { MessageDialog.CreateAndShow(MessageDialogStyle.Ok,"Press results", "Hey, let go of me! " + (e.ElapsedTime/1000).ToString() + " seconds elapsed!"); _label.Text = "Long pressed"; };

 

In the delegate, all we do is pop up a MessageDialog window.  There are two ways of working with MessageDialog, you can create one directly and then show it, or like we’ve done here, you can use the static CreateAndShow method.

 

Finally we have the PinchGesture Detector.  A pinch is a two finger concurrent tap, followed by either sliding your fingers closer together, or further apart.  Ultimately the value of most importance is the e.Scale, which determines if they pinched larger ( out ) or smaller ( in ) and how much.  By multiplying the e.Scale value against the widget’s current size, it will either scale larger or smaller.

 

_pinchGestureDetector.PinchDetected += delegate(object sender, PinchEventArgs e) { Vector2 newSize = new Vector2(e.Source.Width * e.Scale,e.Source.Height * e.Scale); e.Source.SetSize(newSize.X,newSize.Y); _label.Text = "Pinched"; };

 

One really confusing thing I ran into is the PinchGestureDetector’s PinchEndDetector is never fired!  Be aware of this; although truth is, you don’t really need it in the end.  As I mentioned at the beginning, there is also a DoubleTapGestureDetector, but it doesn’t work.

 

Finally, we wire all of these GestureDetectors to our ImageBox widget using this code:

_imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_flickGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_dragGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_tapGestureDector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_longPressGestureDetector); _imageBox.AddGestureDetector(_pinchGestureDetector);

 

You can have multiple widgets using the same gestures, and as you can see in this example, a single widget can have multiple detectors attached.  The remaining code is all stuff we have covered in prior tutorials.

 

Here is the result in action.  Since the Simulator doesn’t support multitouch, I took a video of my Vita in action.

 

Pinching, zooming, tapping, dragging and pressing on the PlayStation Vita with the PSSDK

 

 

Once again, you can download the full project here.

Programming


5. June 2012

 

As part of the same document that announced the PlayStation Mobile compatible phones fromplaystation-mobile-on-htc HTC, Sony also released a list of developers currently working on PlayStation Mobile content.  Give it a look and I believe that you will agree that it is fairly impressive:

 

 

 

 

List of Third Party Game Developers and Publishers

 


JAPAN


ACQUIRE Corp.
ARC SYSTEM WORKS CO.,LTD. 
ARTDINK CORPORATION
ASCII MEDIA WORKS Inc. 
ASGARD Co.,Ltd. 
ASOBIMO,Inc.
CYBERFRONT Corporation
D3PUBLISHER INC.
eitarosoft, inc.
ENTERBRAIN, INC. 
FromSoftware, Inc
G STYLE CO.,LTD.
Gameloft
GungHo Online Entertainment, Inc.  
GUST CO.,LTD.
HAMSTER Corporation
IDEA FACTORY Co., Ltd.  

 


 

EUROPE/PAL

 
Atomicom Ltd.
Beatnik Games Ltd. 
Big Head Games Ltd.
Crash Lab Ltd.
Futurlab Ltd. 
Green Hill
Honeyslug Ltd.
Icon Games Entertainment Ltd. 
Omni Systems Ltd.
Origin8 Technologies Ltd.
Playerthree Ltd. 
IMAGEEPOCH INC.
Index Corporation 
Kadokawa Games, Ltd.
Kadokawa Shoten Publishing Co., Ltd. 
KAYAC Inc.
MAGES. Inc.
MarvelousAQL Inc.
NCM Entertainment Corporation / Forever Entertainment S.A. Group
NEX ENTERTAINMENT CO.,LTD.
Nippon Ichi Software, Inc.
Pygmy Studio.Co., Ltd.
Q Entertainment Inc.
SEGA Corporation
SPIKE CHUNSOFT Co.,Ltd.
SUCCESS Corporation
SYNC Inc.
TECMO KOEI GAMES Co., Ltd. 
34  companies in total
22 companies in total
Pompom Software Ltd.
Quirkat Inc.
Retroburn Game Studios Ltd.
Ripstone Ltd. 
SFB Games Ltd.
Spinning Head Software Ltd. 
Thumbs Up
Tikipod Ltd.
Triangle Factory
Vlambeer
Wired Productions Ltd.

 


 

 

Some pretty impressive names in there, from Sony, From Software and GameLoft to Nippon, Tecmo and Sega.  If you want, you can download the original PDF here.  The scei.co.jp press release is available here.  With heavy weight support behind their effort, Sony may become a big player in the ( currently horrible? ) Android game market.

 

 

So, if Sony had this many developers lined up and working on PlayStation Mobile games, why didn’t they mention that at the E3 press conference???  I am sure nobody would have minded a few minutes axed out of the Wonderbook demonstration!

News


5. June 2012

 

At E3, Sony announced that Sony PlayStation Suite would be rebranded as PlayStation mobile.  More importantly, they announced that HTC would be the first 3rd party Androidatt-htc-one-x manufacturer to release a PlayStation certified phone, but they never went into any details about what that phones would be supported.  It appeared to be an HTC One that he was holding on stage.

 

Fortunately, that information is available on Sony’s Japanese corporate site:

 

The license program to expand PS Mobile, dedicated for portable hardware manufacturers. SCE will not only license logos but also provide necessary development support. As of June 5, 2012, the line-up of PlayStation™Certified devices include the HTC One series of smartphones, HTC One™ X, HTC One™ S, and HTC One™ V. Content developed with official version of PlayStation®Mobile SDK will be available on those devices later this year, also Xperia™ arc, Xperia™ acro, Xperia™ PLAY, Xperia™ acro HD, Xperia™ S, Xperia™ ion, Xperia™ acro S from Sony Mobile Communications AB, and "Sony Tablet" S and "Sony Tablet" P from Sony Corporation.

 

It seems strange that the information was here, but not as part of the official announcement!

 

Anyways, there you have it.  PlayStation Mobile is coming to the HTC One X, S and V phones, in addition to Sony’s existing lineup.  Now lets just hope they sign a deal with Samsung soon!

Smile

News


4. June 2012

 

As was just announced at E3, Sony has rebranded PlayStation Suite to PlayStation.mobile. 

 

All of our existing tutorials will will still work exactly the same, and I will rebrand them as I come to them. I aim to make this site “the site” for all your PlayStation Mobile programming needs.

 

Code wise, absolutely nothing has changed, but if you are coming here from a search engine and you run into a post referring to the  PlayStation Suite SDK, you now know why.

 

 

Other than the change to PlayStation Mobile, Sony has now officially announced a partnership with HTC, bring PlayStation mobile to more devices!  Long rumoured, it is nice to know that there are going to be PlayStation based HTC phones!

 

So, if you are interested in developing for PlayStation Mobile, head over here for a list of tutorials to get you started!

News


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