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13. November 2019


The open source MIT licensed game engine Xenko just released version 3.1.  We have featured Xenko several times in the past including this somewhat outdated tutorial series.  The 3.1 release is somewhat difficult to nail down what is new, as the release blog post primarily focuses on the new NuGet features:

Xenko was always a big proponent of NuGet: since first version, Xenko was distributed as a NuGet package.

However, due to limitations (hello packages.config and project.json!), we were leveraging NuGet more as a distribution medium than proper NuGet packages: Xenko 3.0 is still a monolithic single package and it would not work out of the box when referenced from Visual Studio without using Xenko Launcher and Game Studio.

Xenko 3.0 paved the way by making Xenko compatible with the new project system (game projects were referencing Xenko using a PackageReference).

Today, Xenko 3.1 brings Xenko as a set of smaller NuGet package, each containing one assembly, with proper dependencies:

GitHub

As a result, it is now possible to create a game project that references only the packages you want.

You can learn more about the release, as well as a complete unfiltered change long here.  One other thing to be aware of before upgrading to Xenko 3.1 is the requirement to use Visual Studio 2019!  You can learn more about Xenko and this release in the video below.

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4. June 2019


The Xenko open source game engine ( previously covered here, here and in tutorial form when it was still called Paradox here ) just released a complete game demo called Starbreach.  The demo was demonstrated at GDC 2017 and was recently updated to the current version of Xenko and has been released with full source and assets.

Details of the Starbreach demo from the Xenko blog:

Hi everyone, Silicon Studio agreed to release the Starbreach demo from GDC 2017, along with all associated assets as open source (see license), for the Xenko community to use. Code in the project is released under an MIT license, the assets are released under a attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) license.

Starbreach was originally developed as the Xenko GDC demo for 2016 by Silicon Studio with art support from N-iX production studios. Virgile Bello (xen), Xenko’s lead developer has spent a chunk of time updating the demo and assets to work with the latest release of the Xenko.

You can find the demo and assets here: https://github.com/xenko3d/Starbreach

Check out the demo in action and learn how to get started in the video below.


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24. December 2018

Xenko 3.1 beta has just been released.   This is the first major point release since the Xenko project went open source this summer.  The primary focus of this beta is reorganizing Xenko to make it play nicely with the NuGet distribution system, although this refactoring has some very cool side effects.  Now you are able to use individual components of Xenko on their own.  For example, if you wanted to use the Xenko graphics library on it’s own, you can, independent of the rest of the Xenko game engine.  This release also moves towards Xenko using .NET standard.

Details of the release from the Xenko blog:

Xenko was always a big proponent of NuGet: since first version, Xenko was distributed as a NuGet package.

However, due to limitations (hello packages.config and project.json!), we were leveraging NuGet more as a distribution medium than proper NuGet packages: Xenko 3.0 is still a monolithic single package and it would not work out of the box when referenced from Visual Studio without using Xenko Launcher and Game Studio.

Xenko 3.0 paved the way by making Xenko compatible with the new project system (game projects were referencing Xenko using a PackageReference).

Today, Xenko 3.1 brings Xenko as a set of smaller NuGet package, each containing one assembly, with proper dependencies:

GitHub

As a result, it is now possible to create a game project that references only the packages you want. Here are a few examples of “core” packages:

  • Xenko.Engine: allows you to use core engine runtime (including its dependencies)
  • Xenko.Core.Assets.CompilerApp: compile assets at build time
  • Xenko.Core.Mathematics or Xenko.Graphics: yes, if you want to make a custom project only using Xenko mathematics or graphics API without the full Xenko engine, you can!
  • Xenko.Core.Assets, Xenko.Presentation or Xenko.Quantum: all those piece of tech being used to build Xenko tooling are also available for reuse in other projects. Nothing prevents you from generating assets on the fly too!

Then, various parts of the engine are distributed as optional packages:

  • Xenko.Physics
  • Xenko.Particles
  • Xenko.UI
  • Xenko.SpriteStudio
  • Xenko.Video

If you don’t reference those packages, they won’t be packaged with your game either. In many situations, it results in a smaller packaged game and improved startup time.

In addition to the above changes, you can take a look at the commit log on GitHub for other aspects that made it into the 3.1 release.

GameDev News


2. August 2018


Today saw the release of version 3.0 of the Xenko game engine.  The Xenko game engine was made by Silicon Studios in Japan, previously known as the Paradox 3D engine.  It was obviously having some issues as a product, with a few announced changes to the licensing structure and then in March rumours that it would be open sourced.  Today that exact thing happened, Xenko 3.0 was released under the MIT license and is now available on GitHub.

As part of this release, Silicon Studios are no longer going to be supporting Xenko development.  Fortunately though, this is not the end for Xenko, as one of the engine developers is currently going to be supporting the engine full time, at least in the short term.  He has started a Patreon account in an attempt to raise the funding required to continue supporting the game engine going forward.

Details from the announcement:

You read that right. Xenko 3.0 is out now, released under the permissive MIT license.

From now on, you can use and modify Xenko completely free — whether you’re a professional, a student, or just looking for a new hobby. This includes both the runtime and editor.

Main focus for this release was on the open-source transition, but Xenko 3.0 also includes some new features, such as a switch to the new C# project system, video, hair and skin rendering. Read the full release notes here.

Silicon Studio no longer supports Xenko, but members of the Xenko team will continue to work on it independently as part of the community. More specifically, I will personally work on it fulltime for the next few months to see if it picks up some steam as a community project. Kudos to Silicon Studio for starting and supporting the project so far! Turning the project open-source and community-driven is a fantastic achievement.

While the majority of the 3.0 release was targeting at moving to open source, there were a few additional features including video playback support and hair rendering.  Additionally the SiliconStudio namespaces were removed, so if you are an existing Xenko developer, you will have to do some refactoring. 

If you are interested in learning more about the Xenko game engine, be sure to check out our Closer Look review, as well as our much older Tutorial Series.   You can see hands-on with the engine in this video and see what it is capable of in the 2017 demo reel.

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25. April 2017

 

In beta for a couple of years now, Silicon Studios have just released Xenko Game Engine.  If you are interested in learning more, we did a complete tutorial series back when it was known as Paradox 3D.  As part of the release pricing information has finally been announced.

XenkoPricing

Until July 31st, the Pro version will be available for free.  Xenko is a cross platform 2D/3D game engine with an editor and full Visual Studio integration.  The primary language is C#.  The personal release requires a splashscreen and has a $200K USD revenue limit.

We did a hands on video detailing the new release below and embedded below.

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