Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon Join the GFS Discord Server!
3. September 2013

 

Way back in October of 2012 I mentioned the Platino 2D game engine.  It runs in Appcelerator Titanium a cross platform JavaScript based mobile development system.  Platino appears to have it’s roots in QuickTiGame2D, and open source 2D Titanium game engine.  Anyways, after several months in closed beta Platino is finally available to the public and it’s grown into an entire family of products.

 

image

 

Excerpts from the launch press release:

Over the past several months, we’ve been fine-tuning our Lanica product line and giving some of you early access to new goodies as we roll them out.  During that warm-up phase, we focused mainly on big studios to ensure that Lanica could handle the most heavyweight demands of mobile gaming and interactive development before we let it loose to the masses.

And now, without further ado, we’re releasing the Lanica Game Platform to indie developers!

What does that mean?  Well, most importantly, we’ve rolled out lower prices for indie devs, non-profits, and educational institutions to access Lanica.  You’ll no longer have to break the bank to have the power of our entire game-making platform in your hands.  Now, no matter what the scale of your operation, any developer can make use of all the big guns that we offer.

[SNIP]

If you’re new around these parts, we should probably explain why we’ve decided to release Lanica as a three-pronged platform for making games:

You see, we realize that most developers out there already have their own processes in place, and it’s unfeasible for them to just drop everything and pick up a whole new platform every year.  That’s why we’ve built the Lanica Game Platform as a multi-tiered but separable platform, so developers can incorporate Lanica into their workflow at any scale — whether it’s just one tool or the entire platform.  We didn’t want Lanica to be an ‘all or nothing’ deal, that simply would not have been fair.  Instead, you can mix and match specific pieces of the Lanica Game Platform to fit your own development needs.

For instance:  Let’s say you absolutely love your current code editor, but are in dire need of a better sprite animator — Animo Sprites will have you covered!  Want better particle effects, but can’t part with your current framework?  You can use Animo Particles!  Need to step up to a completely new game engine? Then Platino (a.k.a. the JavaScript juggernaut) is your baby!

We don’t want to leave anyone out in the cold, so be sure to check out our entire product line and see what could work for you.

 

I was in on the closed beta and will say, working in Titanium is a breeze and the SDK is quite nice.  I never really got much into using the other tools other than to play around with the particle tool.  What I’ve been waiting on most was pricing and today we’ve finally got it:

 

image

 

Note the * beside all of the prices?  That’s because you don’t actually purchase monthly, it’s a bit of marketing slight of hand.  So basically the Platino Engine is 816$ a year for companies, or 408$ a year for indies.  Add another 144/72$ if you want to add in app purchase support.  To be honest, those prices are a great deal higher than I was expecting, especially given the amount of competition there is out there.  I am especially shocked there isn’t a complete package price point.

 

That said, if you are using Titanium and want a game engine, Platino is the only game in town and it’s a good game indeed.  Just not a cheap one, at least compared to it’s peers.

News


2. July 2013

Back in March I reported that Ludei was bringing WebGL support to their HTML5 performance wrapper, CocoonJS.  Today I received the following email:

 

The latest version of our Cloud and Launcher is available now! 
The wait is finally over! CocoonJS1.4 is NOW available in Google Play! We are still pending approval with the Apple App Store, so please check daily for its debut! This version includes the following awesome features:

  • WebGL support is now available! For the first time ever, publish your 3D games to iOS and Android devices!
  • Convenient 1-click Publishing to 5 App Stores -- bundles generated for: Apple, Google Play, Amazon, Chrome Store, Pokki
  • Improved Configuration Options for the Ludei Cloud Compiler
  • Updated Third Party SDKs -- advertisements, social integration and in-app payments
  • Improved Resources Management
  • Improved Audio Implementation that supports more HTML5 features
  • Improved webview support allowing you to develop HTML5 web apps while still having all our extensions available to monetize and make your game or app successful
  • And much more!! Click here to read the blog post!

 

This means you can now develop WebGL games and use Cocoon to deploy them to iOS and Android.  I am not sure if you ever tried running a WebGL application in a mobile browser… it's appalling.  None of the official browsers support WebGL, and the few that do ( Dolphin? ) got abysmal framerates.  So, if you want to run a high performance WebGL based game on mobile devices, CocoonJS is about your only option.

If you've never heard of CocoonJS, it's basically a high performance, striped down browser optimized for gaming.  It acts as a host for your game, so you bundle your game and Cocoon together to create an App Store deployable application.

 

In the same release, Ludei also announced:

Ludei Secures $1.5M in Funding 
We just announced that we recently received $1.5M in funding from key venture capitalists and angel investors, further validating the increasing industry support of HTML5 development. Click here to read more.

So you don't need to worry about they going anywhere sometime soon!

News


19. February 2013

I have been working on a long running, but slow in development, series of posts on authoring a level creation tool using HTML5.  It covers how to actually create an application using the popular MVC design pattern, implemented using the YUI3 libraries, as well as the EaselJS graphic library.

 

If you are interested in HTML5 application development, or in a ( simple for now ) level editor, hopefully this series is of interest to you.  

 

 

Table of contents link.

 

 

Current Contents:

 

Expect this to be updated over time as I continue.

Programming


30. January 2013

 

Don’t you just love it when you are thinking about doing something, then someone else comes along and does exactly that thing for you?  Well, exactly just that very thing just happened to me.  I had long considered doing a comparison post of some of the most popular HTML5 game engines, facing them all against each other implementing a common game and see which one came out on top.

 

Well, BuildNewGames.com just did exactly that.  In their words:

Today we are going to compare three popular JavaScript game engines: CraftyJS, ImpactJS and LimeJS. You really can’t go wrong with any of these great choices, but they do have their own strengths, weaknesses and style. Taking some time to get to know what’s out there is well worth it before embarking on a game

 

Most interestingly, he followed in the vein of popular TodoMVC example, of implementing a standard application to give you a quick glance at each framework in action.  The author has implemented a Breakout clone using each library.  Like so:

breakout screenshot

 

This is a very useful exercise, and I hope others pick up the baton and implement the same program in their framework of choice. 

 

In the end, ( spoiler alert ), the author comes to the follow conclusion:

So which engine is the real winner? I will leave that to you to decide. Since Lime and Crafty are free and open source, it’s easy to dive into them and give them a whirl. Impact is at a disadvantage here, as you need to pony up for the license before you can start playing with it. It’d be nice if Impact had some sort of trial period option.

 

If you are trying to select a JavaScript game engine, this is certainly a great read.

News Programming


7. December 2012

 

Yesterday the cocos2d community announced the first coordinated release of the cocos2d products.  What products comprise this family?

 

  • CocosBuilder v3.0-alpha0
  • cocos2d-html5 v2.1
  • cocos2d-iphone v2.1-beta4
  • cocos2d-x v2.1beta3-x–2.1.0

 

So what is the relationship between these products?  Well, this gets a bit confusing…  cocos2d is the original library, an Objective-C port of the original cocos2D Python library.  cocos2d-x is the C++ port of this library.  cocos2d-html5 is the JavaScript (HTML5) port, while CocosBuilder is… well, its new.

 

 

CocosBuilder is, in their own words:

 

CocosBuilder is a free tool (released under MIT-licence) for rapidly developing games and apps. CocosBuilder is built for Cocos2d’s Javascript bindings, which means that your code, animations, and interfaces will run unmodified on iPhone, Android and HTML 5. If you prefer to go native all the way, there are readers available for cocos2d-iphone and cocos2d-x.

Testing your game on a mobile device has never been quicker or easier, just install CocosPlayer on your device (or in Simulator) and CocosBuilder will push your code over wifi in just a few seconds. Hit the publish button and your game will be saved instantly to a html5 web page. CocosBuilder has a rich set of functions, including boned animations, nestling of interface files, support for multiple resolutions and automatic scaling of your assets.

 

 

Basically, they’ve bundled all the various products together into a standardized release.  I’ve not had a chance to sit down with CocosBuilder, but it sounds like a cool idea.  We have a number of Cocos2D HTML tutorials on this site if you are interested in seeing a cocos2D application in action.

News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List