Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
26. February 2019


If you are a College or University student and are looking for the ultimate game development summer job, Google’s Summer of Code could be perfect for you!  Of specific interest to game developers, the open source Godot Engine is one of the sponsored projects.  The GSoC is basically a match making service, where Google matches up summer students with open source projects to work on projects that can be completed in a 3 month window, with Google picking up the tab. 

Students are required to submit project proposals for what they intend to work on.  Each GSoC project has a list of example projects for tasks they would like to see completed, here for example are the Godot projects.  If you are accepted, you will be paired with a mentor then spend the summer developing your project.  To be eligible you must:

Student Eligibility

  1. Must be at least 18 years old at time of registration.
  2. Must be enrolled in or accepted into an accredited institution including (but not necessarily limited to) colleges, universities, masters programs, PhD programs and undergraduate programs as of the GSoC Student Acceptance Date (May 6, 2019).
  3. Must be eligible to work in their country of residence during duration of program.
  4. Must be a resident of a country not currently embargoed by the United States.

You will also receive a stipend based on 3 different milestones.  The amount earned is dependent on your country of residence adjusted for cost of living.  The dollar amount ranges between $3000USD and $6600USD, the exact amount can be determined here.

GameDev News


27. January 2019


We just published a brand new 18 part text tutorial series over on DevGa.me, Getting Started with Godot Step by Step Tutorial Series.  This tutorial walks you through theEBookCoverA4Format entire game creation process using Godot 3.1, from creating your initial project, to publishing your game with details step by step instructions and screen shots.  Even better it’s got professional quality art assets from Game Developer Studios and is completely open source!

The tutorial consist of:

Getting Started with Godot

Setup and Project Creation

Creating your Title Screen

Playing Background Music

Global Data via Autorun

Creating a Simple UI

Creating the Main Game Scene

Creating Parallax Clouds

Creating the Player

Handling Input

Add a Scene Animation

Creating Bullets

Creating the Enemies

Configuring the Collisions

Populating the Game World

Adding Shooting to the Game

Making Things Explode

The Final Code

Building your Game for Windows

If you need more detailed information on any subject we cover, be sure to check our existing Godot 3 Tutorial series, that goes into much more technical detail.  There will be a step by step video version available shortly.  There is also a 70pg PDF version of this tutorial available for Patreons.

Programming Art Design


14. January 2019


With the recent release of Godot 3.1 beta, it’s a good time to look at the future.  That is exactly what Juan Linietsky, lead developer on the Godot engine has done.  On Twitter he laid out his current roadmap for development priorities in Godot 4.0/4.1.

In a pair of tweets, he first discussed general Godot improvements, mostly around the renderer:

Godot

Then in a second tweet, he discussed Physics improvements:

Physics


Keep in mind, although Juan is the lead and perhaps most important developer on the Godot team, he is by no means the only one.  This means even though you don’t see a feature on the two above lists doesn’t mean it wont happen, as there is a vibrant community of developers adding new features to Godot.

GameDev News


8. January 2019


Godot 3.1 just became one step closer with the first Beta release, after several prior alpha releases.  Details of the beta release from the Godot blog:

After an alpha phase that took longer than anticipated, we're now ready to enter the beta phase for Godot 3.1, which means that the feature work is finished for this version. From now on, we are in release freeze, which means that new features will no longer be merged, and we will focus solely on fixing release-critical bugs.

This should allow to finish polishing this release quickly and hopefully be ready to publish it by the end of this month. See this GitHub issue for details.

Contrarily to our 3.0.x maintenance releases, which include only thoroughly reviewed and backwards-compatible bug fixes, the 3.1 version includes all the new features (and subsequent bugs!) merged in the master branch since January 2018, and especially all those showcased on our past devblogs. It's been almost a year since the 3.0 release and close to 6,000 commits, so expect a lot of nice things in the final 3.1 version!

While there are no formal release notes available yet, the following change log tracks the majority of changes in the 3.1 release.  Highlights of this release include:

  • OpenGL ES 2 support returns (alongside ES3 support)
  • Visual Shader Editor improvements (video)
  • CSG support (video)
  • 2D and 3D physics improvements, including Softbody and Ragdoll systems
  • 2D mesh and skeletal deformation (video)
  • KinematicBody2D improvements
  • Optional static type support (video)
  • 2D Animation improvements (video)
  • 3D Animation improvements (video)
  • much, much more

The 3.1 beta release downloads are not available on the primary download page and can only be downloaded here for GDScript only builds and here for Mono/C# builds.

GameDev News


24. July 2018


Most scripting languages, GDScript included, are type-less.  Instead of explicitly declaring variable types in script, it is inferred by the compiler or interpreter.   This can make code easier to write but can also make it harder to maintain, especially as complexity increases.  This is why you see solutions like TypeScript for JavaScript, this adds a type layer on top of a type-less language.  If you were hoping to see type support added to GDScript, well great news, that’s exactly what just happened!

In the upcoming release of Godot 3.1, a completely optionial type system has been added to Godot 3.1.

From the Godot news page, details of how the new type system can help:

It is quite common to use a variable only with values of the same type. With the dynamic nature of GDScript, you can inadvertently overwrite a variable with a different type and break your code logic in a way that might be hard to realize.

For instance, if your function expects a number, but you missed an input validation somewhere and is passing a string to it instead, you only will see an error at runtime (and only if you reach that point). In a larger code base, it's quite easy to miss things like that.

With type hints, Godot can know beforehand that you are passing the wrong type and show an error while you are editing the related code, even if you never run it.

You can learn a great deal more about the new type system in Godot 3.1 here.  To see the syntax in action, check out the video below.

GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List