Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
13. July 2019


Although Godot gained C# support with the release of Godot 3.0, it was missing support for key platforms, specifically mobile and browsers.  News from the Godot website indicates that Godot will receive C# support on the Android platform starting with Godot 3.2, thanks in a large part to a funding grant by Microsoft.

From the news entry by Ignacio Roldán Etcheverry:

Today I'm glad to announce we've finally made it happen. Godot 3.2 will ship with support for exporting C# games to the Android platform.

The process of exporting a game for Android with C# is the same as it would be if you were using GDScript. Godot will make sure to add all the assemblies and dependencies to the exported APK. No extra steps are required from you.

It supports all target ABIs Godot does (armeabi-v7a, arm64-v8a, x86 and x86_64). Currently, we only use JITed code, with AOT support coming in the future.

If you want to try Android C# support with Godot you need to build it yourself until the 3.2 release occurs.  Details of building with Mono support are available here.


They also discuss the future plans:

The next step in the roadmap is integration with the MonoDevelop IDE. More details will come in the next devblog, in a bit less than a month. You can expect much awaited features like debugging as well as better experience for opening files with this IDE (currently we use the command line with bad results). Thanks to the editor re-write, this will be a much easier task.

If you're wondering about support for WebAssembly and iOS or integration with Visual Studio and VS Code, don't fear. Those are all on the roadmap. You can expect to hear more about them in the future.

Learn more in the video below.

GameDev News


3. July 2019


Over on the Godot website and update on the status of the Vulkan renderer that is the marquee feature of Godot 4.0.  Vulkan is the Khronos Group’s new low level rendering alternative to OpenGL, that enables developers to get much closer to the metal than previous graphics APIs.  Development of the new Vulkan renderer was started back in May 2019 and has progressed rapidly since.  Development is on Github under the vulkan code branch.


Details from the Godot news site:

One of the main features that will be present in Godot 4.0 is the new RenderingDevice abstraction. Up to now, it was impossible to do any internal modifications to how Godot does rendering. This means that if you wanted to run custom low-level rendering code to a texture or buffer, custom post-processing, custom drawing code (other than what Godot shaders allow), custom compute, etc., this was not possible without modifying Godot's rendering backend.

-snip-

Currently, RenderingDevice is more or less complete (compute support is missing) and the 2D engine is halfway being ported. Work on 3D rendering will begin near the end of the month.

There are a few ramifications for developers, but they are minimal.

In modern rendering APIs, there are architecture changes that force us to break compatibility and do some things differently. The immediate one is that it is no longer possible to set repeat, filter, etc. flags on imported textures. In 2D, this will be set per canvas item (Control or Node2D) using a new set of options. It will be also be possible to specify this in the shader or the material options (or just globally, if you are making a pixel art game).

Of course the question most people are probably asking is… when?

The goal is to have a more or less complete rewrite of the existing Godot 3.x feature set by October (cross your fingers), hard work and long hours are being put towards this.

Learn more, as well as how to get the Vulkan branch from GitHub in the video below.  If you are interested in learning Godot, be sure to check out our Godot tutorial series available here.

GameDev News


26. April 2019


Several weeks ago, Godot 3.1 finally shipped after a year of development.  Since then, several details and hints about what are coming in the 3.2 release have become available.  This post is gathering all of those details together in a single place.

There have been a few posts on the Godot website detailing 3.2 features:

In addition to these announced features, several more have been discussed on Twitter.

image

image

image

image


Now what’s not happening in Godot 3.2:

image

Godot 4.0 is a release much further down the road and will include the Vulkan renderer and other improvements.  For details on the 4.0 release check out this previous post.

Programming General


11. April 2019


One of the most requested Godot tutorials I get is to cover how to export models from Blender to Godot and retain textures, animations and more.  Therefore I have created exactly that tutorial in both video and text formats, hosted on our sister site devga.me.  This tutorial is mostly in Blender, showing how to properly configure textures, an armature and create NLA strips so when exported “it just works” in Godot.  This example uses Blender 2.79 and Godot 3.1.

Don’t forget, if you want to learn Godot we have a complete Godot 3.x tutorial series available here, a step by step creating a full 2D game tutorial available here.  We also have Blender tutorials available in our tutorial section that should get you up to speed using the popular open source 3D application.

Art Design


21. March 2019


After doing keynotes for Google, Unity and Unreal, some people have been asking when the Godot keynote is going to be.  The answer is basically never… these things cost millions of dollars and that’s just not compatible with the way Godot’s open source development works.  That doesn’t mean that exciting things haven’t been happening in the land of Godot, some big and some small enough they didn’t merit their own coverage.  So here we are!


Godot 3.1 Was Released

Obviously the big news is, after a year in development, Godot 3.1 became a reality last week!  You can watch our video on the subject here and read the official blog here.  Usability improvements across the entire engine, a GL ES2 renderer, CSG support, optional static typing and much more were added to the engine.


Rust Language Bindings

Want to use the Rust programming language in Godot?  Now you can thanks to this set of GDNative language bindings available on Github.


GDScript Playground

It’s an interactive browser based way to run and test GDScript.  Check it out here.


Battle for Wesnoth Porting to Godot

First teased in a tweet it seems the popular open source turn based strategy game Battle for Wesnoth is being ported from C++ to the Godot Engine.  Link to the Wesnoth 2.0 prototype on Github thanks to Feniks Gaming.


Offline Documentation Builds

Got spotty internet or just want an offline copy of the Godot documentation?  Now you can get it from this nightly build source.  It’s basically the online documentation built for offline use.


GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List