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4. November 2019


The Godot open source game engine is growing at a massive rate.  To properly manage that growth and to set expectations of community behaviour, Godot have released a code of conduct.

From the Godot blog, details of why they created a code of conduct:

During the past five years of free and open source, collaborative development, we've been blessed with one of the best-behaved online communities that I have been in contact with. The vast majority of users on all our community platforms dearly care both for the Godot project itself, but also for all their fellow participants.

Yet there are occasional outliers, and to properly moderate an ever growing community (more than doubling in size each year) we need a written statement for the de facto guidelines that our moderation teams have applied until now. This will give users a clear overview of our expectations for positive and respectful behavior. Community moderators, who are also participants donating their free time to ensure a safe environment for all users, will therefore be able to back their decisions with common guidelines.

You can read the specifics of the new code of conduct here.  You can learn more about the change in the video below.  If you are interested in learning more about the Godot Engine be sure to check out our tutorial series or our complete 2D game in Godot tutorial.

GameDev News


15. October 2019


Material Maker is a free and open source MIT licensed procedural texture generation tool built using (and that can run within) the Godot game engine.  Material Maker 0.6 was just released.

Details of the 0.6 release from the Itch.io news page:

  • Material Maker is now a lot more generic and nearly all generators are based on GLSL shaders that can be edited. To test this feature, just drag one from the library to the graph editor, selected the newly created node and hit Ctrl+F. The node becomes editable, and hitting the pencil button will show the shader editor that can be used to define the node's parameters, inputs, outputs, and GLSL functions that will be used to generate textures. For now it lacks diagnostic tools, so you'd better start with  code you already tested (in shadertoy for example). Since images described in GLSL are math functions, all those generators are resolution independent.
  • It is now possible to create a group of interconnected generators using Ctrl+G. This will create a new node that contains the previously selected ones, while keeping all connectivity with other nodes of the graph. To edit the new subgraph, click on the pencil button of the newly created node ; and to get back to the parent graph, use the Up button in the top left corner of the view. If a Remote node was selected, it will be used to define the new node's parameters.
  • All nodes now have embedded previews. Just click on the closed eye left of each node output to open it.
  • The 3d preview can now be moved manually, and the "O" button in its top right corner will show the preview as background of the graph view.
  • the library pane now has icons for many generators and a filter.
  • There are quite a few new generators: truchet, weave, runes, mirror and kaleidoscope.

The source code for Material Maker is hosted on GitHub, although the 0.6 code doesn’t seem to have been made an official release yet.  Material Maker can also be downloaded from within the Godot Engine, in which case it will directly create a Spatial Material ready for use in your Godot game.  The standalone release instead exports a series of PNG textures for use in whatever engine or application you wish to use.

You can learn more about Material Maker in the video below.

GameDev News


7. October 2019


Godot, the popular open source 2D/3D game engine, just released the first alpha of Godot 3.2.  This means that there is a complete feature freeze and hopefully we will see a final release of 3.2 in just a few months time.

Details from the Godot News:

After close to 7 months of development and over 4,000 commits since the 3.1 release, we are now happy to release Godot 3.2 alpha 1, our first milestone towards the next stable installment of our free and open source game engine.

This first alpha build comes relatively late in our planned release schedule, mostly because of work done on our official build infrastructure to adapt to 3.2 requirements (changes to the Android buildsystem and packaging, especially with the new C# support), as well as a build server upgrade. But we have been in the alpha stage since August 31, and testers and developers were not idle in the meantime, so the master branch from which 3.2 will be released is already quite stable. As such we expect the alpha and beta phases to be quite short for Godot 3.2, and a stable release within one or two months should be possible.

The alpha stage corresponds for us to a feature freeze, as announced on GitHub a month ago, which means that we will no longer consider pull requests with new features for merge in the master branch, and that until Godot 3.2 is released. This way, we can focus on what we already have, finish and polish the major features which are still in progress, and fix many of the old and new bugs reported by the community.

Alpha snapshots will be released regularly during this phase, to continuously test the master branch and make sure that it keeps getting more stable, reliable and ready for production.

Note: While we are behind schedule, we still plan to release Godot 3.1.2 as soon as time permits.


Godot 3.1 alpha1 can be downloaded here or here (if you also require C# support).  Release notes are not yet available but there is an in-depth changelog of new features available here.  If you are interested in learning Godot, be sure to check out our complete ongoing tutorial series available here.  Watch the video below for more details on the 3.2 release of Godot.  The game mentioned at the beginning of the video is Resolutiion and is coming soon to Steam.

GameDev News


2. October 2019


Today Godot announced they have a new platinum sponsor, Heroic Labs.  A platinum sponsor has pledges at least $1500 a month towards the development of Godot, an open source 2D/3D game engine that is open source and entirely crowd funded.  This pledge should help with the future development of Godot, enabling Godot to employ more developers in a full time capacity.

Details of the sponsorship from the new posts:

Today, open source game development tools do a similar job. They help everyone –– from indie developers to AAA studios –– to focus on creating the best game rather than having to rebuild a physics engine, shift graphics blobs manually in memory, or develop reliable back-end infrastructure.

That’s why we created Nakama and made it open source. We wanted game developers to have access to the same high quality back-end functionality that’s available to developers working in other industries. Crucially, we wanted to make sure that anyone could build their game with Nakama, whether they’re learning in their bedroom, bootstrapping as an indie dev, or trying something new at a big studio.

We’re thrilled that Godot shares our passion for open source tooling and we’re excited by the possibilities unlocked by combining Godot and Nakama.

Plus some details of their future plans regarding Godot:

Nakama is a real-time, competitive, social back-end that helps game developers create compelling multiplayer experiences. Already we have integrations with Unity, Unreal Engine, Swift, Android, and more.

Right now, we’re working on our integration with Godot Engine and we’ll post an update once it’s available. Nakama and Godot together will give a whole new generation of game developers the opportunity to build resilient, beautiful, and immersive gameplay experiences.


Nakama is an open source back end server for networked games.  You can host it yourself or use their managed hosting solutions.  You can learn more about the sponsorship and about Nakama in the video below.  If you are interested in learning how to use Godot, be sure to check out our tutorial series available here or our step by step series available here.

GameDev News


9. September 2019


Back in February we announced that Godot was a recipient of the annual Google Summer of Code.  Essentially this is an open source effort funded by Google where they pay students to work on open source projects.  This year the Godot game engine had 8 students working on various different projects.  At this point the GSoC is over and Godot released the results of this years efforts.

The projects consisted of:

You can learn more about the results of any individual project by clicking any of the links above or by clicking here.  If you are interested in learning how to use the Godot game engine, be sure to check out our complete tutorial series available here.  Learn more about the GSoC entries for 2019 in the video below.

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