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2. August 2018


Today saw the release of version 3.0 of the Xenko game engine.  The Xenko game engine was made by Silicon Studios in Japan, previously known as the Paradox 3D engine.  It was obviously having some issues as a product, with a few announced changes to the licensing structure and then in March rumours that it would be open sourced.  Today that exact thing happened, Xenko 3.0 was released under the MIT license and is now available on GitHub.

As part of this release, Silicon Studios are no longer going to be supporting Xenko development.  Fortunately though, this is not the end for Xenko, as one of the engine developers is currently going to be supporting the engine full time, at least in the short term.  He has started a Patreon account in an attempt to raise the funding required to continue supporting the game engine going forward.

Details from the announcement:

You read that right. Xenko 3.0 is out now, released under the permissive MIT license.

From now on, you can use and modify Xenko completely free — whether you’re a professional, a student, or just looking for a new hobby. This includes both the runtime and editor.

Main focus for this release was on the open-source transition, but Xenko 3.0 also includes some new features, such as a switch to the new C# project system, video, hair and skin rendering. Read the full release notes here.

Silicon Studio no longer supports Xenko, but members of the Xenko team will continue to work on it independently as part of the community. More specifically, I will personally work on it fulltime for the next few months to see if it picks up some steam as a community project. Kudos to Silicon Studio for starting and supporting the project so far! Turning the project open-source and community-driven is a fantastic achievement.

While the majority of the 3.0 release was targeting at moving to open source, there were a few additional features including video playback support and hair rendering.  Additionally the SiliconStudio namespaces were removed, so if you are an existing Xenko developer, you will have to do some refactoring. 

If you are interested in learning more about the Xenko game engine, be sure to check out our Closer Look review, as well as our much older Tutorial Series.   You can see hands-on with the engine in this video and see what it is capable of in the 2017 demo reel.

GameDev News


24. July 2018


Back in May of 2018, Pixel Game Maker MV was first announced, a new 2D game engine from Kadokawa, the makers of the seminal RPGMaker series of game engines.  Instead of targeting the JRPG style of game, Pixel Maker is aimed at top down and side scrolling platforming games like Zelda, Metroid or Castlevania.  These tools are aimed at people who want to do minimal programming, however they can be extended using the JavaScript language. 

Pixel Maker is now available on Steam in early access form.  Here is the description of Pixel GameMaker MV:

Create action games with ease - no programming necessary
You can now create your very own full action games without the need for any programming whatsoever. Compatible with JavaScript extensions, anyone from total beginners to seasoned developers can enjoy game creation to the fullest.
Create endless fun with “Multi-Viewpoint/Multi-Versus”
Allows for both top- and side-based views, as well as cooperative or competitive local play between up to four players. Works with any genre, so the games you can create are limited only by your imagination!
A simple way to create rich and beautiful game graphics
Using the graphic import feature, physics engine, particle effects, and multiple layer combination, you can create your own ideal game in exactly the way you want to make it, easily and without all the hassle.


If you are interested in learning more, I purchased the engine and did a brief hands-on, mostly walking through the interface.  That video is available here as well as embedded below.  The early access release is currently available at %20 off the retail price, currently just over $60USD.  As you will see from the video below, this is an early access product and some features are certainly missing, incomplete localization certainly topping the list!

GameDev News


18. July 2018


When I started GameFromScratch, by far and away the most common question I got was “what programming language should I use?”.  It’s amazing how much the world has changed in the last decade!  These days game engines are by far more important than programming language to the majority of developers, and one game engine has risen to the forefront of most peoples consciousness…  Unity.

I consistently cover a wide variety of game engines, here, on DevGa.me and on YouTube and one comment comes up far more often than any other...  “Why Not Just Use Unity?”.  Why would I use this game engine instead of Unity.  So I decided to take some time and answer exactly this question.  The short hand text version is available here as well as covered in a great deal more detail in this video.

GameDev News Programming


17. July 2018


Are you looking for an open source cross platform HTML5 powered game engine, that’s open source, free and comes with a complete editor in addition to the underlying framework?  Perhaps the Wade Game Engine by Clockwork Chilli is what you are looking for.  While open source, WADE is shipped under a custom license you should take note of.  The TL;DR version of the license:

This license allows you to make games and non-games, for any purpose including selling and licensing, without paying anything to Clockwork Chilli. However you must not:

  • Distribute non-compiled (or non-minified) versions of Clockwork Chilli's source code.
  • Create a product that competes with WADE.

You can run WADE directly in the Chrome browser or can download a local installed version for Linux, Mac and Windows platforms.  If you want to learn more, be sure to check out the WADE game engine in action in this video or embedded below.

GameDev News


12. July 2018


Tilengine is a 2D graphics engine that replicates 16bit style graphics, including SNES Mode 7 effects.  It previously was available under the MIT license, but the rendering core was proprietary.  Now the entire package has been released under the LGPL license.


Details from the Tilengine forum:

Tilengine is now a complete open source project. I've released the full source code under the LGPL license, that allows usage in closed source applications as well as in open source projects.


I've opened it because Tilengine is now a mature project that requires more work than I can do in my spare time. Previous version was released under the MIT license, but kept the rendering core as a closed source component, distributed as a prebuilt binary. I hope that this movement will encourage more people to adopt it, either to use in their own projects, or to contribute to it helping to expand the Tilengine community.


GitHub project doesn't include prebuilt binaries or external dependencies anymore. If you don't want to build the library yourself, the official place to get the prebuilt binaries for every supported platform is in its itch.io profile, just as before. Please keep in mind that as of this writing, binaries on itch.io aren't yet updated and still hold old MIT-licensed 1.21 binaries. I'll post a note when they get updated.


This new 2.0 release number reflects the change of philosophy. This release is nearly the same as the older 1.21, but has a new feature: the ability to create multiple instances of the engine and switch between them with a global context mechanism.

If you are interested in learning more about Tilengine, be sure to check out our hands-on video:


For more details about the change of Tilengine to the LGPL license, be sure to check out the following video:

GameDev News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

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