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29. August 2018


Looking for a small but full featured open source (LGPL) C++ 14 game engine with a built in editor?  If so, the Limon Game Engine might be the perfect choice for you!  Primary features of the Limon game are:

  • Model loading using Assimp
  • Skeletal animations
  • Realtime shadows
  • Rigid body physics
  • 3D spatial sound
  • Preliminary AI
  • In game map editor
  • Trigger volumes
  • API for Custom Trigger code
  • Loading shared libraries that has Trigger code
  • Creating Animations in editor

Additionally the engine is documented, with the manual available here.  The source code is cleanly written C++ 14 code and is available on Github.  The engine works on Windows, Mac and Linux with binaries available for download here.  If you are interested in seeing the engine in action, be sure to check out our hands-on video, embedded below.  There are additional videos available on the Limon YouTube channel, available here.

EDIT – The author in response to the video has released an updated version, with the editor key changed in 0.5.2 to the much more sensible F2 key.

GameDev News


10. August 2018


Cerberus X is a custom programming language and IDE designed for 2D game development.  It is an open source rebranded version of the Monkey X programming language, which in turn was inspired by the Blitz series of BASIC-esque programming language.  Cerberus X is now open source, available on Github and released under the zlib open source license.

Details of the current release:

FIX: [GLFW.ANGLE] Added z coordinate to mouse button events.
NEW: [GLFW.ANGLE] Added mousewheel event.
NEW: [AGK] Added support for AppGameKit OSX 64bit Desktop and the iOS platform.
FIX: [IOS] When you build and run, the iOS Simulator opens up again and the app will be installed and run.
MOD: [ANDROID] Updated to latest Gradle build tools and SDK
NEW: [mojo] Added SetColor:Int(rgb:Int) command so you can use hex color rgb values.
MOD: [mojo/mojo2] Added debugging log if loading an image failed.
FIX: [AGK/AGK_IOS] Fixed media folder being deleted evey other compile run.
FIX: [AGK/AGK_IOS] Fixed AGKBuildTarget creating an unusable native function.
FIX: [example] Changed server to httpbin.org in the mak/httprequest example.

For more information and to see Cerberus in action check out the video below.  You can download Cerberus X on itch.io.

GameDev News


9. August 2018


Yoyo Games have just announced that the open beta for Nintendo Switch support in GameMaker Studio 2 is now available.  The formal release should launch in September, enabling GMS developers to publish their games for Nintendo’s popular console.  There are already a few GameMaker developed titles on the Switch, such as Undertale and Hyper Light Drifter.  There is however an additional cost to enable Nintendo Switch export from GMS, detailed below.

Details on getting started:

To become an authorized Nintendo Switch developer, please sign up at https://developer.nintendo.com.

The next step, once you have signed-up as a Nintendo Switch developer, is to register your request to take part in the Open Beta via Nintendo’s GameMaker middleware web page. Please note, you will be required to sign-in to your Nintendo Developer account to access this page.

Lastly, to participate in the Nintendo Switch Open Beta for GameMaker Studio 2, you will also require either a Nintendo Switch licence ($799/ 12 months) or a GameMaker Studio 2 Ultimate licence ($1,500 / 12 months), which provides access to all of our export options. Once approved, these will be available to purchase on your YoYo Games account.


Please note, I signed up as a Nintendo developer and was unable to access the middleware page, so hopefully this is an issue that is resolved soon.  If you are interested in learning more about GameMaker, be sure to check out our complete review.

GameDev News


7. August 2018


With CopperCube 6 recently being made available in a free form, we decided to do a complete tutorial series over on devga.me that should get users up and running creating complete 3D games using CopperCube in well under an hour.

The series consist of:

Getting Started

Creating a Terrain

Creating a Camera

Programming Your Game

Collisions and Physics

Extending CopperCube

Scenes and Rooms

Importing Your Own Assets

Additionally there is a video tutorial covering all of the above topics available here and embedded below.

Programming Design Art


2. August 2018


The Toy Engine was just released yesterday.  The Toy Engine is a cross platform modular C++ open source game engine currently available under the GPL license.  The engine is quite young so you should expect some instability and missing features.  The developer @HugoAM has been very responsive to feedback and has announced that the license will be changed to something more permissive in time.  The source code is available now on GitHub.


The guiding design principals behind the Toy engine are:

  • simple and lightweight, simplicity is the core aim and philosophy behind toy. the codebase is about one-tenth the size of competing engines, and toy is so light, the whole editor runs in your browser !
  • modular, each functionality is enclosed in a small, simple, easy to understand code building block. most of these blocks lie in the underlying mud library.
  • extensible, as a collection of modules, toy is a perfect fit to build your own game technology, keeping full control over the components you use, the application design and the control flow.
  • game code first, toy is first and foremost meant to build games in native c++ code, in direct contact with the core systems. this allows for much greater control than typical scripting in-engine.
  • versatile, toy is designed from the start with complex games in mind, such as strategy or role playing games, by giving full control over its powerful user interface and rendering systems.
  • zero-cost tools, reflection automatically extends your game core code for seamless scripting, editing, inspection of your game objects, types and procedures in the built-in tools/editor.
  • educative, toy aims to provide simplest technical solutions to typical game programming problems, easily studied and understood, hoping to be a driver of education on game development topics.
  • fast iteration, coupling seamless bindings of both built-in systems and game code to various scripting languages, hot-reload of native code, and immediate UI and rendering, toy provides fast iteration speeds.

The Toy engine is built upon the underlying mud framework, which provides the low level cross platform functionality that toy is built on top of.  The mud framework is built on the much better ZLib open source license.  You can compile Toy on both Windows and Linux.  Toy games can be run on most modern platforms including mobile, desktops and even HTML via EMScripten.  The video embedded below demonstrates how to get started using Visual Studio 2017.

GameDev News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

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