Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
2. April 2019


Today marked the release of Microsoft’s seminal IDE Visual Studio 2019.  It is available for download right now at https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/downloads/.  The community edition of Visual Studio 2019 is completely free to use so long as your company makes less than $1M USD annually or has > 250 PCs.   Free trials for the Professional and Enterprise versions are also available.  For more details on the differences between versions, be sure to check here.

There are several new improvements and features available in Visual Studio 2019 including improved performance and start up times, a new AI driven code tool called IntelliCode, .NET core 3.0 support, C# data breakpoints, tighter integration with GitHub and Azure, multiple improvements to mobile development using Xamarin, a new remote coding interface called Live Code and much more.  You can read the complete Visual Studio 2019 release notes here.

Visual Studio 2019 for Mac also received a new release, including intellisense support taken directly from Visual Studio.  You can read the full release notes here and download here. (be sure to click the MacOS tab if required).

You can watch a condensed to under 10 minute version of the keynote in the video below.  In addition to the keynote, Microsoft have a series of training materials and more in-depth sessions available at https://visualstudio.microsoft.com/vs2019-launch/.

GameDev News


12. February 2019


Orx is a fairly unique data driven plugin based C++ game engine we featured a previous version here.  The project is open source under the ZLib license and works on Windows, Linux and MacOS and can target these platforms plus iOS and Android.


New features of Orx 1.1 include:

  • GLFW 2.7 to GLFW 3.3 for updated display, mouse, joystick and keyboard support.
  • Multiple monitor support.
  • Support for gamepad mappings (as per SDL database).
  • Hardware cursors and icons.
  • Updated Android support.
  • Drag and Drop support for file names.
  • Clipboard support.


Full details of this release are available in the change log and precompiled binaries are available here.  Be sure to watch the video below to learn more about this unique 2D game engine.

GameDev News


7. February 2019


Today we are looking at the Magnum Engine, a cross platform C++ game framework, which just released version 2019.1.  It is very similar in scope and functionality to the Kha Framework and the BS::Framework.  The Magnum Engine is completely modular, so you only pay for the functionality you need and ignore the rest.  It provides most of the functionality you would require to build a game engine including rendering, scene graph, audio, input handling, texture and model loaders and more.

The Magnum Engine is available on the following platforms and/or using the following renderers:

  • Linux and embedded Linux
  • Windows, Windows RT (Store/Phone)
  • macOS, iOS
  • Android
  • Web (asm.js or WebAssembly), through Emscripten

Graphics APIs:

  • OpenGL 2.1 through 4.6, core profile functionality and modern extensions
  • OpenGL ES 2.0, 3.0–3.2 and extensions to match desktop OpenGL functionality
  • WebGL 1.0, 2.0 and extensions to match desktop OpenGL functionality


The project is open source and hosted on GitHub under the MIT open source license.  Getting started documentation is available here while several compiled examples can be found here.  To learn more about the Magnum Engine, be sure to check out the video below.

GameDev News Programming


31. January 2019


Today we are looking at WickedEngine, an open source C++ based 3D game engine with Direct 11/12/Vulkan rendering paths, an Entity Component System and Lua scripting available.  It is inspired by the XNA programming model and has no external dependencies, making it incredibly easy (especially for a C++ project) to get started.  Additionally there is a fully functional level editing tool available, already compiled and ready to use.  The full list of features is available here.  The engine supports Windows platforms including PC and UWP (Phone, XBox, PC).

WickedEngine describes itself as:

Wicked Engine is an open-source game engine written in C++. The main focus is to be easy to set up and use, light weight, high performance, and graphically advanced. The full source code is provided with the MIT license, which means, anyone is free to use it for anything without additional considerations. The code shall not contain any parts with other licensing. The code is hosted on GitHub: https://github.com/turanszkij/WickedEngine For any questions, please open an issue there.

Additionally the developer has maintained a very interesting technical blog on the topic of engine development available here.

WickedEngine is not the only modern open source C++ 3D game engine.  Other similar engines we’ve covered recently include:


Learn more about WickedEngine and see the editor in action in the video below:

GameDev News


30. August 2018


Due to it’s popularity in the professional game industry, I get all kinds of requests for C++ based game engines.  That is exactly what this guide is, a collection of game engines that use C++.  This is not about game engines that are written using C++, many if not most game engines are at least partially written using C++, instead it covers engines where you (can) primarily use C++ in developing an actual game using the engine.  So without further ado, let’s jump into the list of (3D only) game engines that (can) use C++ to develop games.


The game engines, in no particular order:

CryEngine (Learn More)

Lumberyard (Learn More)

Unreal Engine

OGRE  *Technically a renderer

G3D Innovation Engine (Learn More)

Godot (Learn More)

Torque3D

Banshee Engine (Learn More)

Source Engine

Limon Engine (Learn More)

idTech

Leadwerks

IrrLicht

Urho3D (Learn More)

Toy Engine (Learn More)

Panda3D (Learn More)

Esenthel (Learn More)

Tombstone Engine (C4 successor)

PhyreEngine

Unigine

Shiva

LumixEngine (Learn More)


The list is not comprehensive but tries to at least get most of the options out there.  If I missed something, please let me know in the comments below.  For more information on all the engines listed above, be sure to check out the following video.  Any engine with a learn more link to the right of it means we have previously covered this engine in video form.


Programming


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List