Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
23. September 2019


Google have just launched Google Play Pass a monthly subscription service for applications and games on the Google Play store.  Google Play Pass is launching first in the Unity States and will cost $4.99 per month, with an introductory price of $1.99 a month.  Intended to launch for more than 350+ games and applications, you can see an initial list of known launch titles here.

There are details available for developers available here with more details available on the Android developer blog here.  Integrating existing applications is easy:

A single APK supports distributing your app in the Google Play Store and through Play Pass, so you can take advantage of both opportunities without spending a lot of extra time on development. All you need to do is integrate a few Google Play APIs to enable a seamless experience for Play Pass subscribers:

  • Paid apps are free for Play Pass subscribers to enjoy. Developers integrate with the Google Play licensing service to limit access only to paying users.
  • IAPs are free for Play Pass subscribers and can be unlocked automatically. No integration is required beyond checking the Google Play Billing API for new or removed purchases when your app starts and resumes.
  • Ads are automatically removed for Play Pass subscribers while continuing to surface for the general Play audience. Developers integrate by defining an IAP that removes advertising.

In terms of making money, here are the details we know:

Being a part of Google Play Pass’s curated collection of apps and games can help you attract new users who may not have discovered your titles on their own. Subscribers can find your content either through the new “Play Pass” tab or by looking for the Play Pass “ticket” badge that indicates apps and games unlocked with Play Pass. And the more value subscribers find in your title, the more revenue you’ll earn on a recurring basis.

In addition, for a limited time, we’re offering a low introductory price for Play Pass subscribers so that even more users will subscribe and discover Play Pass content. Google is funding this launch offer so that you can benefit from subscriber interest without impacting the revenue you can earn.

Exact revenue share details are unavailable.  Developers can sign up for consideration for the service here.  You can learn more about Google Play Pass in the video below.

GameDev News


27. September 2018


Today Google announced the release of ARCore 1.5 as well as Sceneform, a real time 3D framework with a physically based renderer for Android.  The 1.5 release comes with runtime support for loading glTF models, the ability to ID individual point cloud points, and a newly open source UX library in Sceneform.  In addition to the Android release, there are builds of ARCore 1.5 for Unity and Unreal Engine developers as well.

Details from the Google developer blog:

Today, we're releasing updates to ARCore, Google's platform for building augmented reality experiences, and to Sceneform, the 3D rendering library for building AR applications on Android. These updates include algorithm improvements that will let your apps consume less memory and CPU usage during longer sessions. They also include new functionality that give you more flexibility over content management.

Here's what we added:

    • Supporting runtime glTF loading in Sceneform
    • Publishing the Sceneform UX Library's source code
    • Adding point cloud IDs to ARCore
    • New devices (plus Chrome OS in the form of Chromebook Tab 10)

You can download the source for Sceneform here on Github, the code is released under the Apache 2.0 source license.  Unity developers can click here, while Unreal Engine developers should click here.

GameDev News


4. August 2018


Romain Guy, a developer on the Android graphics team, just released Filament, an open source Apache 2.0 licensed PBR based renderer for Android, Linux, MacOS and Windows.  Filament was designed to be as small as possible and with optimal performance on Android.


The renderer currently possesses the following features:

APIs
  • Native C++ API for Android, Linux, macOS and Windows
  • Java/JNI API for Android, Linux, macOS and Windows
Backends
  • OpenGL 4.1+ for Linux, macOS and Windows
  • OpenGL ES 3.0+ for Android
  • Vulkan 1.0 for Android, Linux, macOS (with MoltenVk) and Windows
Rendering
  • Clustered forward renderer
  • Cook-Torrance microfacet specular BRDF
  • Lambertian diffuse BRDF
  • HDR/linear lighting
  • Metallic workflow
  • Clear coat
  • Anisotropic lighting
  • Approximated translucent (subsurface) materials (direct and indirect lighting)
  • Cloth shading
  • Normal mapping & ambient occlusion mapping
  • Image-based lighting
  • Physically-based camera (shutter speed, sensitivity and aperture)
  • Physical light units
  • Point light, spot light and directional light
  • ACES-like tone-mapping
  • Temporal dithering
  • FXAA or MSAA
  • Dynamic resolution (on Android)

The Filament renderer is currently used in the Sceneform ARCore augmented reality framework.  Filament is exceedingly well documented and is a great read for anyone working on a renderer, even if you have little interest in using Filament in your own project.  The Github page contains documentation on getting started and the source contains several examples on how to use Filament.

GameDev News


8. June 2018


Recently Google started rejecting APK files generated by the Godot Game Engine.  APK is the file format for bundled Android applications for deployment to the app store, so this is obviously a pretty serious problem for Godot developers with games on Android.  Thankfully a Godot user created a tool that fixes APK files, making them compatible once again.


Details of using the new tool:

The things you will need are:

  • Your original APK
  • A valid android keystore
  • Jarsigner

The tool takes several command-line options:

  • -j /path/to/jarsigner
  • -k /path/to/keystore
  • -p keystore password
  • -a key alias
  • /path/to/apk

You should be able to recover these settings from the Android export settings of the original game project from the Godot editor.

An example run of the program looks like this:

./godotapkfixer -k ~/tmp/and/debug.keystore -p android -a androiddebugkey GOLTORUS.apk

This is assuming that 'jarsigner' exists in $PATH, or on Windows if the Android studio is installed. If this is not the case the tool can be ran like this:

godotapkfixer.exe -j "C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.8.0_171\bin\jarsigner.exe" -k "debug store.keystore" -p android -a androiddebugkey GOLTORUS.apk

When using jarsigner from the JDK for instance.

After the program has finished you will find an apkname_fixed.apk in the same directory as the original APK. This APK should now be good to upload back onto the Play store.


The tool is available for download here and the source code is available here.  You can read more about this release here on the Godot website.

GameDev News


20. December 2017


Apple recently required all developers on the App Store submit their apps in 64-bit or be subject to removal.  Google have just announced similar, but less draconian measure for their own Google Play store.  Details of the new requirements from the Android Developer Blog:

  • In the second half of 2018, Play will require that new apps and app updates target a recent Android API level. This will be required for new apps in August 2018, and for updates to existing apps in November 2018. This is to ensure apps are built on the latest APIs optimized for security and performance.
  • In August 2019, Play will require that new apps and app updates with native libraries provide 64-bit versions in addition to their 32-bit versions.
  • Additionally, in early 2018, Play will start adding a small amount of security metadata on top of each APK to further verify app authenticity. You do not need to take any action for this change.

We discuss the change in this video in more detail.

GameDev News


AppGameKit Studio

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List