Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
3. July 2019


In a Unity blog post today, Unity announced that Enlighten support was being removed from the Unity game engine.  Enlighten is the lightmapping and global illumination solution used in Unity since Unity 5 was released.  Enlighten was original developed by Geomerics, which was acquired by ARM technologies in 2013, then the technology was sold to Silicon Studio in 2017.

Details of the removal on the Unity blog:

Due to Geomerics shutting down Enlighten as a product, Unity is required to remove Enlighten.

Unity will continue support for Enlighten in the built-in renderer as it currently exists today (as-is, with no new platform support). The 2020 LTS will be the last version to contain Enlighten functionality for the built-in renderer, and it is fully removed in 2021.1.

Projects authored with HDRP Preview Enlighten functionality will continue to be supported as it currently exists today (as-is, with no new platform support) in 2019 LTS, with full removal of Enlighten functionality from HDRP in 2020.1.

They are working on a solution:

We are also fully committed to delivering a real-time GI replacement solution in 2021.1. The Unity team has a solid plan to solve this complex problem the right way, with great artists workflow and optimal runtime performance for 2021.1.

Additionally, in the linked forum discussion are some good details on the limitations of the current Enlighten solution that will be addressed in their new in-house solution:

Enlighten has had a good run for the money, some of the best looking titles have shipped using it. However, some of the underlying principles means that it is not a good fit moving forward.
Enlighten is largely surface based, requires a global pre-computation phase and is limited to diffuse transport with no real support for physically based non-opaque materials. Some of the drivers moving forward are:

  • Fast iteration: Time-to-first-pixel needs to be fast, cannot have a lengthy pre-compute step.
  • Easy authoring: We need to remove the dependency on authoring suitable UVs and other surface based authoring.
  • Dynamic worlds: In addition to dynamic materials and lighting setup, we have to support dynamic geometry (eg. for procedural games).
  • Unified lighting: The lighting container needs to be decoupled from surfaces. This allows all scene elements to use the same lighting including volumetrics and participating media.
  • Large worlds: Due to the sheer size of levels today we need an easy way to to do localized light transport where what is lit and what is affecting that lighting is decoupled.
  • Source access: We need to have full access to all source in-house. So that we can independently drive development forward, fix bugs and support future platforms. This is arguably the most important point.

For these reasons we have decided that the best course of action is to no longer pursue software we have limited control over and move on.
That said the feature set that is available now will be supported until 2023 (via 2020 LTS), and we are happy to support you in the transition.

I’m still not entirely certain what they mean by Geomerics shutting down however, as it’s resources were sold way back in 2017 and everything seems to be business as usual.

GameDev News


3. July 2019


Over on the Godot website and update on the status of the Vulkan renderer that is the marquee feature of Godot 4.0.  Vulkan is the Khronos Group’s new low level rendering alternative to OpenGL, that enables developers to get much closer to the metal than previous graphics APIs.  Development of the new Vulkan renderer was started back in May 2019 and has progressed rapidly since.  Development is on Github under the vulkan code branch.


Details from the Godot news site:

One of the main features that will be present in Godot 4.0 is the new RenderingDevice abstraction. Up to now, it was impossible to do any internal modifications to how Godot does rendering. This means that if you wanted to run custom low-level rendering code to a texture or buffer, custom post-processing, custom drawing code (other than what Godot shaders allow), custom compute, etc., this was not possible without modifying Godot's rendering backend.

-snip-

Currently, RenderingDevice is more or less complete (compute support is missing) and the 2D engine is halfway being ported. Work on 3D rendering will begin near the end of the month.

There are a few ramifications for developers, but they are minimal.

In modern rendering APIs, there are architecture changes that force us to break compatibility and do some things differently. The immediate one is that it is no longer possible to set repeat, filter, etc. flags on imported textures. In 2D, this will be set per canvas item (Control or Node2D) using a new set of options. It will be also be possible to specify this in the shader or the material options (or just globally, if you are making a pixel art game).

Of course the question most people are probably asking is… when?

The goal is to have a more or less complete rewrite of the existing Godot 3.x feature set by October (cross your fingers), hard work and long hours are being put towards this.

Learn more, as well as how to get the Vulkan branch from GitHub in the video below.  If you are interested in learning Godot, be sure to check out our Godot tutorial series available here.

GameDev News


1. July 2019


Every month Epic Games make several assets on their asset store free for that month and July is no exception.  You have to “buy” the content during the month of July, at which point it is yours forever.  In addition each month they release a few assets that are free forever.

The July free marketplace content consists of:

The following assets are permanently free:

Learn more on the Unreal Engine blog or by watching the video below.

GameDev News


27. June 2019


Back in April Unity launched Unity Learn, a completely free online learning portal for learning various aspects of using the Unity game engine.  Today they have announced Unity Premium, a paid expansion of Unity learn.  Unity Learn Premium costs 15$ a month, and is included in current Unity Pro subscriptions.  There is a 30 day free trial available.

Details of Unity Learn Premium from the Unity blog:

We believe that everyone should have access to high-quality, free learning resources for Unity, and we will continue to add to and maintain the free courses, projects, and tutorials on Unity Learn. More in-depth and advanced resources for serious hobbyists and professionals who want to specialize in an industry or get direct guidance will be available through Unity Learn Premium.

If you have a Unity Plus or Unity Pro license, you can access Unity Learn Premium for free with your current subscription. Just log in with your Unity ID and go to Unity Learn Premium to start learning!

Otherwise, you can try Unity Learn Premium for 30 days, free. After that, you can continue accessing all the great resources and interactive learning on Unity Learn Premium for $15 a month. 

In addition to content from Unity, Learn Premium also includes courses from partners such as Udemy and Pluralsight.  They are also offering bi-weekly online interactive sessions as well as Streaming Labs, quick start courses in a web hosted Unity Editor.

Check out the contents of Unity Premium in the video below.

GameDev News


25. June 2019


Once again, Steam’s annual summer sale is upon us, and of course loads of software of interest for game developers are on offer.  This guide highlights some of the items on sale.  Many of these programs we’ve covered in the pass.  In those cases, click the Learn More link to… learn more.

GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List