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24. July 2019


AppGameKit Studio, the successor to the AppGameKit game framework was released today.  Available now on Steam and coming soon to the Game Creators website, Studio builds on top of the API provided in the AGK framework, bringing a full editor environment for designing, coding and debugging your game.

From the Steam description:

AppGameKit Studio is a fully featured game development tool set. We’ve re-imagined the game development user interface with an all-in-one work space. You can now quickly drag & drop assets to visualise your scenes, code with AppGameKit Script, easily browse app media, run live debugging sessions, access online help and lots more.


AppGameKit Studio allows you, in a few easy clicks, to quickly publish your games to Steam, iOS, Android and a host of other places! Get your apps and games in front of millions of potential players and make yours the next big hit.

Working with a pre-release version, we created a text based introduction and getting started crash course available over on DevGa.me, as well as the video version embedded below.  Either version should give you a good idea of the features that AGK:S bring to the table, as well as give you a good grounding on how to get started.

GameDev News


24. July 2019


Today, the Khronos group announced that Autodesk has joined the consortium, specifically the 3D Formats Working Group and the 3D Commerce Exploratory Group.  The Khronos Group is the regulatory body guiding such efforts as OpenGL, Vulkan, OpenCL and of course glTF.  This is a long winded way of saying that Autodesk, makers of popular 3D applications such as 3DSMax and Maya as well as industry standard AutoCAD, are moving to support the open standard glTF.

Details from the Khronos website:

Big news! 3D software developer, Autodesk has joined the Khronos Group. Autodesk is an industry-leading provider of 3D design, engineering and entertainment software, that joined the 3D Formats Working Group to support the Khronos glTF file format and the 3D Commerce Exploratory Group, a group of companies exploring standards and guidelines for the production and distribution of real-time 3D representations of products. glTF is an open standard for efficient and reliable encapsulation and transmission of 3D assets and scenes, including PBR materials and animations.

Autodesk is committed to accelerating the adoption of open standards as industry-wide collaboration is critical to improving our customers’ workflows and advancing computer graphics technology,” said Henrik Edstrom, senior software architect, Graphics Technology at Autodesk. “As the need for interoperability and consistency between applications and across platforms becomes increasingly important, we see great value in open data formats like glTF. There is also more demand for richer experiences on web, mobile, and XR platforms, and new opportunities in areas such as general compute and real-time ray tracing. We’re excited to be part of the Khronos group and the evolution of computer graphics.

Further support for the open and real-time friendly glTF format is a step forward in interoperability between game engines and DCC tools and away from proprietary and complicated formats such as Autodesk’s own Filmbox (FBX) format, or that of prior overly complicated open standards such as COLLADA (DAE).

Interestingly, there was no mention of MAX, Maya or games in general in the entire article, arguably the biggest sector impacted by this announcement.

GameDev News


22. July 2019


Ubisoft, or more specifically Ubisoft Animation Studio, has just joined the Blender Foundation as a gold sponsor.  The Blender Foundation Development Fund is a way for individuals and corporations to contribute financially to the development of Blender.  Additionally, UAS will be adopting Blender 2.80 for future animation projects.

Details from the Blender news:

Today Ubisoft announced that they will join the Blender Foundation’s Development Fund as a corporate Gold member. Not only will Ubisoft help funding online support for Blender developers, Ubisoft Animation Studio – a department of Ubisoft Film and Television – will also use Blender for their productions and assign developers to contribute to Blender’s open source projects.

Pierrot Jacquet, Head of Production at Ubisoft Animation Studio says “Blender was for us an obvious choice: Its strong and engaged community paired up with the vision carried by the Blender Foundation makes it one of the most creative DCC of the market.”

“Good news keeps coming” says Blender founder and chairman Ton Roosendaal, “it’s such a miracle to witness the industry jumping on board with us! I’ve always admired Ubisoft, as one of the leading games and media producers in the world. I look forward to work with them and help them finding their ways as a contributor to our open source projects on blender.org.“

As well as from Ubisoft:

For those that may not know, Blender has been around for quite some time as open-source animation software. Why has Ubisoft chosen now to become a Corporate Gold Member?

PJ: We believe that Blender 2.8, which will be released in the coming days, is a game-changer for the CGI industry. Blender has been on Ubisoft's radar for a long time already, and in the past year, more and more of our artists have shown an interest in using it in production. The growth of our internal Blender community, as well as the innovations brought by 2.8 – e.g. a revamped UX, Grease Pencil, EEVEE real-time rendering – convinced us that this was the right time to bring support to our artists and productions that would like to add Blender to their toolkit. What better way to support that switch than donating to the Blender Foundation, so we can help Blender to continue to grow?

How does working with open-source tools balance out with in-house developed tools?

PJ: At Ubisoft Animation Studio, we will always have very specific needs, and in-house development is the most efficient way to serve these.

On the other hand, when we had our own DCC, we had to spend a significant amount of time to maintain and improve the core of the software; this was less time we could spend innovating. Working with open source solutions like Blender offers us more flexibility and frees some resources to focus on research and exploration of new ways and tools to create animated shows.

Our discussions with the Blender Foundation have shown us that our goals are aligned, making the open source collaboration the obvious choice.

The above is only a portion of the complete Ubisoft interview about their plans for using Blender and open source in the future.  If you are interested in supporting Blender, be sure to check out details on the Corporate Developer Fund available here or here (PDF).

GameDev News


21. July 2019


The cross platform open source Java based game framework libGDX just released version 1.9.10.  If you are interested in learning libGDX we have a comprehensive tutorial series available here and a video series available here.  While the tutorials are a few years old, libGDX is a mature framework that has stayed relatively stable over time, so they should still be perfectly valid.  This release updates several of the dependencies to newer versions as well as an update to the Gradle build system.

Highlight details of the release include:

  • GWT update to 2.8.2
  • MobiVM release 2.3.7
  • Lwjgl 3.2.1
  • Lots of QOL and bug fixes for GWT backend
  • Better iOS backend customization
  • PixmapPacker features like NinePatch and whitespace stripping
  • InstancedRendering support via Mesh and InstanceBufferObjects
  • SCENE2D (Standard tweaks and improvements across the board)
  • Gradle updates to latest

Full release notes and details are available here.

GameDev News


20. July 2019


Machinations.io is a fairly rare breed, a tool dedicated to game design.  Currently in a free beta, Machinations is a browser based tool for designing and simulating mechanics for gameplay.

Descriptions for the Machinations.io website FAQ:

Machinations.io is a browser-based platform to design, balance and simulate game systems. It allows you to map any game system in an interactive diagram, set parameters that define elements and the relationship between them, and visualise the way in which these systems work. Based on that, you can simulate different outcomes, plot results and balance your game economy.


If you are familiar with diagramming software like Visio or have used a mind mapping application, you have a decent understanding of Machinations.  Machinations is however one of those tools that is easier to understand when seen in action, so I would recommend watching the video below.

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