Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
1. October 2011

 

 

I love Blender, but one of the hands down most irritating things is the default hotkey for switching between Vertex,Edge and Face editing modes.  CTRL + TAB + 1/2/3 is just too many keys for something common.  Fortunately Blender 2.5x adds the ability to define hotkeys, but it isn’t as easy as you might expect.

 

 

The steps:

 

Press CTRL + ALT + U to bring up user preferences.

 

Select the Input Tab

 

Scroll down and expand 3D View –> Mesh, like such:

image

 

Click the Add New button:

image

 

 

Add the following three entries:

 

image

 

 

In my case I am using a Mac keyboard, which has an F16, F17 and F18 key above the numberpad.  You can use whatever value you want ( that aren’t used in Mesh mode already). 

 

The value entered in Context Attrib is “tool_settings.mesh_select_mode”.  The Value: fields represent what modes to enable, vertices, edges and faces in that order.  So True, False, False says to enable Vertices, but not Faces or Edges.

 

 

Now, voila.  I click “Save as Default” and now I have a single hotkey for toggling between the editing modes.  I really should have done this ages ago.  In the meanwhile I learned the Blender customization is downright amazing.

Art


26. September 2011

Alright, so it happened 6 days ago, but today is the first time I noticed.

 

 

Blender's document has had a serious facelift.  The new version is much nicer and addresses one of the worst aspects of Blender, the so-so documentation.  The content is the same but now it is actually accessible. 

 

 

 

 

Art


25. September 2011

 

Ok, it actually has been live for a couple days and I forgot to post an update here, oops.

 

 

In this chapter we add animation to our PlayerPaddle class, including player keyboard input.  We cover off topics such as running at the same speed on multiple machines, dealing with protected member variables and using asserts.  Now, I’m off to write part 7.  I swear this is going to make the Guinness world record for the longest Pong tutorial ever!  I hope it’s been useful, please let me know any questions, recommendations or comments you have.

 

 

I proudly present Game From Scratch C++ Edition Part 6.


22. September 2011

 

 

Good news today for Mac users that were interested in developing with the Unreal Unreal Development KitDevelopment Kit (UDK, also known as the game engine used by people who didn’t select Unity ), there is now Mac OS support for UDK developed games.  For UDK developers that is pretty cool news, as it increases your customer base by an easy 5 – 10%.  That said, in Steam surveys, the average Mac GPU is still pretty lousy, but should be getting better with the more recent Mac releases.

 

As for other features in this update:

  • A new foliage editor
  • Dual Monitor support for iPad games via HDMI or Airplay
  • Decals now scale correctly when placed
  • Added texture import option for inverting green channel
  • Slightly increased the size limit of files when importing to 4096x4096x32
  • New button can remove all notifies from an anim set
  • Added editor comments for AnimNotifies
  • UnrealConsole now has text color coding for warnings and errors
  • New ambient sound spline actors emit sounds along paths for adding noise to rivers, roadways, etc. with a single actor

But the big news is easily the addition of Mac support.

 

Full release notes here or jump right in and download here.  Granted, its 1.5GB download and their servers must be taking a bit of a kicking as it is coming down extremely slowly for me.

 

So, if you didn’t choose Unity, this is all good news for you.  If you, like myself, did choose Unity, well…  yeah, nothing to see here.

General


15. September 2011

 

I recently had a user who tried to run Pang on MacOS and there were a few incompatibilities.

 

So today, I fired up my trust old iMac and created my first ever C++ Application in XCode 4.1 and I have to say, it really wasn’t all that pleasant of an experience!

 

 

First off, about Pang.  There are a few small changes that don’t work on the iMac using GCC 4.2.  First is there is no tchar.h header file.  On the same thought, Microsoft’s _tmain is not portable and the entire targetver.h header file doesn’t work.  Reality is, none of these are really a big deal as we are not using any Windows specific features, nor are we supporting Unicode parameters to our main(), so it is all a pretty easy fix.  Simply delete all of these includes, remove targetver.h completely and change make to a traditional main().

 

 

Code wise, there was one gotcha.  GCC 4.2 does not support calling a nest enum’s name.  For example if you have the following:

struct Colour { enum DefinedColours { Red, Green, Blue }; };

 

You can’t do this:

Colour::DefinedColours::Red;

 

Instead you have to do this:

Colour::Red;

 

Which is a shame as I find the one much more readable than the other, but no big loss.  Going forward I will be compiling on both Windows using Visual Studio and Mac OS using XCode/GCC 4.2, so if you are following along using a Mac ( or GCC with CodeBlocks ) the code will be guaranteed to work.

 

 

Now, about XCode.  I will admit this is my first real experience with it.  I played around with 3.x when I first looked into iOS development but never really got a chance to try out 4.1.  I like the idea that they went to a single Window, as a VC developer  XCode 3.x was very alien.  That said, this is about where my likes end.

 

Nothing was intuitive, intellisense ( or whatever it is called in non-Microsoft parlance ) is SLOOOOOOOWWWWWW, the interface is extremely cluttered, the project/scheme system seems odd ( with time this might improve ), the debugging experience was not fun ( weird focus issues with my running application ).  Then worst of all, I had to spent a good 20 minutes figuring out where the hell my compiled application even ended up!

 

Through this experience, as a complete newbie I had to Google a lot and I noticed two trends.  First, all the documentation for earlier versions is useless… its like every single keyboard shortcut and menu was changed completely.  Second, the hate seems to be pretty universal!  Every time I would Google something, half of the answers would be “screw it, stick with 3.4” or similar.

 

That leads me to my question to you Mac C++ developers out there… Does Apple have a bit of a turd on their hands with XCode 4.x, or will it get better as I get used to it?  If not, what IDE are you all using for C++ development on Mac?

 

 

Anyways, long story short, from Pang part 5 on, Mac/GCC will compile unchanged out of the box.  That said, this tutorial is still going to focus on Visual C++ Express as the IDE of choice.

Programming


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List