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25. March 2019


A new game developer friendly Humble Bundle is currently running, this one is the Humble Book Bundle: Coder’s Bookshelf.   As always, Humble bundles are a collection of similar themed items, often Books, Games or other media, increasingly of interest to game developers.  Portions of the proceeds go to charity, humble, the publisher or to support GFS.  Each bundle is broken into tiers, and if you buy a higher tier item, you get all of the items below it.

This bundle consists of:


1$ Tier

Understanding ECMASCRIPT 6

Learn Java the Easy Way

Think Like A Programmer

Python Playground


8$ Tier

Doing Math with Python

Wicked Cool Shell Scripts

Automate the Boring Stuff with Python

The Art of R Programming

The Principles of Object-Oriented Javascript

15$ Tier

The Rust Programming Language

The Book of R

Cracking Codes with Python

Practical SQL


20$ Tier

The LINUX Programming Interface


GameDev News


22. March 2019


At GDC 2018, Microsoft unveiled DXR, or Direct X 12 Raytracing, an SDK enabling real-time raytracing, followed closely by NVIDIA announcing hardware support.  This year at GDC 2019, those technologies have come of age, with major raytracing support coming from 3 major game engine manufacturers.  Additionally NVIDIA have announced some potentially game changing news as well.  Let’s break down the announcements and demonstrations one by one.


CryTek

CryTek started the raytracing announcements off with their amazing real time demo Neon Noir.  Even more impressive, it was done using an AMD card without real-time raytracing support!  Unfortunately, the demo was never released to the public.


Unity

Unity showed an impressive demo Reality vs Illusion which intercuts real world footage and real time raytraced BWM footage that is nearly impossible to discern the difference.  Unity’s technology is sadly several months from being available in a future HDRP release.


Unreal Engine

Unreal is the closest with their real time raytracing implementation, in fact it’s available now in Unreal Engine 4.22.  They also had a presentation in the form of the short movie Troll.


NVIDIA

NVIDIA also had a real time raytracing demonstration in the form of Project Sol, Part 3.  Their announcement may have been the most significant however, as they announced that DXR driver support will be shipping in April to older generation NVIDIA GPUs, such as the 1060/1070 and 1080 cards.

GameDev News


21. March 2019


Earlier at their GDC 2019 keynote, Unity announced the beta release of Unity Distribution Portal, or UDP for short… thank goodness that acronym isn’t taken!  So what exactly is UDP?  Its a combination of a beta package in Unity that integrates with their existing analytics and IAP packages and enables you to submit to the UDP.  The UDP itself is an online portal for managing publishing, IAP and tracking of multiple different online stores around the world. 

Described succinctly as:

Create once, publish everywhere

UDP reduces the engineering complexities associated with publishing to multiple app stores, enables you to distribute and operate games in local markets, and connects you with hundreds of millions of players worldwide through participating app stores.


Currently limited to the Android platform and only a few live app stores ( Catappult and MOO Store), with more coming online soon.  Essentially it allows you to publish to more stores with very little extra effort, all managed and reported in a single interface.  More interesting, is the following question and answer pair from the FAQ:

Does UDP support non-Unity games?

Currently, UDP only supports games made with Unity. However, in the future, UDP will be engine-agnostic. More details on this will be coming soon.

For more details on the Unity Distribution Portal beta visit here.  See it in action in the video below.

GameDev News


21. March 2019


After doing keynotes for Google, Unity and Unreal, some people have been asking when the Godot keynote is going to be.  The answer is basically never… these things cost millions of dollars and that’s just not compatible with the way Godot’s open source development works.  That doesn’t mean that exciting things haven’t been happening in the land of Godot, some big and some small enough they didn’t merit their own coverage.  So here we are!


Godot 3.1 Was Released

Obviously the big news is, after a year in development, Godot 3.1 became a reality last week!  You can watch our video on the subject here and read the official blog here.  Usability improvements across the entire engine, a GL ES2 renderer, CSG support, optional static typing and much more were added to the engine.


Rust Language Bindings

Want to use the Rust programming language in Godot?  Now you can thanks to this set of GDNative language bindings available on Github.


GDScript Playground

It’s an interactive browser based way to run and test GDScript.  Check it out here.


Battle for Wesnoth Porting to Godot

First teased in a tweet it seems the popular open source turn based strategy game Battle for Wesnoth is being ported from C++ to the Godot Engine.  Link to the Wesnoth 2.0 prototype on Github thanks to Feniks Gaming.


Offline Documentation Builds

Got spotty internet or just want an offline copy of the Godot documentation?  Now you can get it from this nightly build source.  It’s basically the online documentation built for offline use.


GameDev News


20. March 2019


The Unreal Engine 2019 keynote just ended with several new Unreal Engine announcements.  Just like we did with Unity and Google, we have created a condensed version of the keynote presentation available here and embedded below.  Highlights of this keynote include a new mega grant program worth over $100,000,000, additional exclusives to the Unreal store, a Humble Bundle partnership, new and completely free online services we previously discussed here, the new Chaos physics system, Live++ hot reloading in C++ and more. 

MegaGrants

To kick off this year’s Game Developers Conference, Epic Games announced the creation of Epic MegaGrants, a new $100 million commitment to support game developers, enterprise professionals, media and entertainment creators, students, educators, and tool developers worldwide who are doing incredible things with Unreal Engine or improving open-source capabilities for the 3D graphics community.

Epic MegaGrants marks an evolution from the earlier Unreal Dev Grants program, a $5 million fund initially launched in 2015, which just awarded its final grants earlier this week.

Awards from Epic MegaGrants will range from $5,000 to $500,000 and will cover a wide variety of endeavors to further strengthen creativity and innovation within the 3D community. This includes projects built with Unreal Engine or developers enhancing open-source 3D content creation, whether or not it integrates with or relates to UE4.

Chaos Physics

Revealed onstage during the “State of Unreal,” Chaos is Unreal Engine’s new high-performance physics and destruction system coming in early access to Unreal Engine 4.23. The real-time tech demo is set within the world of Robo Recall. With Chaos, users can achieve cinematic-quality visuals in real time in scenes with massive-scale levels of destruction, with unprecedented artist control over content creation. In addition to the initial feature set, Epic will release demo content for Chaos physics and destruction within the 4.23 window.

Online Services

Epic Online Services are free offerings that will make it easier and faster for developers to successfully launch, operate and scale high-quality games. Built from Epic’s experience with Fortnite, which has nearly 250 million players, Epic Online Services provides a single SDK that works across any platform, game engine, and store to help developers give their players a unified, cross-platform social experience. In addition to game analytics and the ticketing system, the growing library of tools includes sentiment analysis, cloud storage, voice communications, and matchmaking. To access the SDK now, visit dev.epicgames.com/services.

Epic Games Store

The Epic Games store launched in December 2018 with the goal of achieving a more open, fair, and profitable platform for developers and publishers, disrupting the industry by offering an 88% revenue share, a great free game every two weeks, and major exclusives. Today Epic announced that the store has grown to 85,000,000 PC players, with its Support-A-Creator program surpassing more than 55,000 creators. Epic also revealed nearly two dozen games coming to the store, along with store performance metrics.

Epic Games is also partnering with Humble Bundle to enable developers to sell their Epic Games store titles on the Humble Store, including Epic store exclusives. Epic will receive no revenue share from the sale of those games purchased through the Humble Store. The partnership will launch with keys redeemable on the Epic Games store, and soon Epic will enable players to link their Epic and Humble accounts for direct purchasing.


To watch our condensed down to under 12 minutes version of the keynote, check out the video below.

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