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4. June 2019


The Xenko open source game engine ( previously covered here, here and in tutorial form when it was still called Paradox here ) just released a complete game demo called Starbreach.  The demo was demonstrated at GDC 2017 and was recently updated to the current version of Xenko and has been released with full source and assets.

Details of the Starbreach demo from the Xenko blog:

Hi everyone, Silicon Studio agreed to release the Starbreach demo from GDC 2017, along with all associated assets as open source (see license), for the Xenko community to use. Code in the project is released under an MIT license, the assets are released under a attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC 4.0) license.

Starbreach was originally developed as the Xenko GDC demo for 2016 by Silicon Studio with art support from N-iX production studios. Virgile Bello (xen), Xenko’s lead developer has spent a chunk of time updating the demo and assets to work with the latest release of the Xenko.

You can find the demo and assets here: https://github.com/xenko3d/Starbreach

Check out the demo in action and learn how to get started in the video below.


GameDev News


3. June 2019


Raylib is an open source C based cross platform game framework released under the zlib/libpng open source license that I previously referred to as “the easiest C/C++ game framework I’ve ever found” and that description is still true today.  Raylib started life as a way to teach non-programmers game development in an accessible manner and I would say for the most part, mission accomplished.  Since that initial release, raylib has continued to improve and the just released raylib 2.5 is one of the biggest releases yet.

Details from the release notes:

  • New window management and filesystem functions to query monitor information, deal with clipboard, check directory files info and even launch a URL with default system web browser. Experimental High-DPI monitor support has also been added through a compile flag.

  • Redesigned Gamepad mechanism, now generic for all platforms and gamepads, no more specific gamepad configurations.
    Redesigned UWP input system, now raylib supports UWP seamlessly, previous implementation required a custom input system implemented in user code.

  • rlgl module has been redesigned to support a unique buffer for shapes drawing batching, including LINES, TRIANGLES, QUADS in the same indexed buffer, also added support for multi-buffering if required. Additionally, rlPushMatrix()/rlPopMatrix() functionality has been reviewed to behave exactly like OpenGL 1.1, models_rlgl_solar_system example has been added to illustrate this behaviour.

  • VR simulator has been reviewed to allow custom configuration of Head-Mounted-Device parameters and distortion shader, core_vr_simulator has been properly adapted to showcase this new functionality, now the VR simulator is a generic configurable stereo rendering system that allows any VR device simulation with just a few lines of code or even dynamic tweaking of HMD parameters.

  • Support for Unicode text drawing; now raylib processes UTF8 strings on drawing, supporting Unicode codepoints, allowing rendering mostly any existent language (as long as the font with the glyphs is provided). An amazing example showing this feature has also been added: text_unicode.

  • Brand new text management API, with the addition of multiple functions to deal with string data, including functionality like replace, insert, join, split, append, to uppercase, to lower... Note that most of those functions are intended for text management on rendering, using pre-loaded internal buffers, avoiding new memory allocation that user should free manually.

  • Multiple new shapes and textures drawing functions to support rings (DrawRing(), DrawRingLines()), circle sectors (DrawCircleSector(), DrawCircleSectorLines()), rounded rectangles (DrawRectangleRounded(), DrawRectangleRoundedLines()) and also n-patch textures (DrawTextureNPatch()), detailed examples have been added to illustrate all this new functionality.

  • Experimental cubemap support, to automatically load multiple cubemap layouts (LoadTextureCubemap()). It required some internal rlgl redesign to allow cubemap textures.

  • Skeletal animation support for 3d models, this addition implied a redesign of Model data structure to accomodate multiple mesh/multiple materials support and bones information. Multiple models functions have been reviewed and added on this process, also glTF models loading support has been added.

You can download raylib here, while the source code is available here.  In terms of learning the API, pretty much all you need to know is available on this cheatsheet.  Additionally there are a huge number of examples available (that can run in your browser) right here, each including full source code.

GameDev News


1. June 2019


Every month for the last several months, Epic Games have made several assets available free on the Unreal Engine marketplace, and June 1st, 2019 is no exception.  You need to purchase the assets during the month to be able to keep them forever, but the purchase cost is zero.  Additionally, a few assets are made available each month permanently free on the market place.  Let’s take a look at the free marketplace assets for June…

June Free Assets:

Permanently Free Assets:


You can also find all of the above assets in the marketplace in the Epic Game Launcher.  Learn more about the June giveaway on the Unreal Engine blog available here.

GameDev News


30. May 2019


In 2017 Adobe announced the End Of Life for the Flash browser plugin was coming at the end of 2020.  Flash developers still had the ability to deploy their applications to desktops and mobile devices using Adobe AIR technology.  Today, Adobe announced the EOL for that platform as well.

As of June 2019, Adobe is transitioning ongoing platform support and feature development of AIR to HARMAN. This will coincide with an Adobe-issued update of AIR, v32, for supported mobile and desktop platforms. HARMAN has a long-standing history as an Adobe AIR partner, maintains knowledge of the platform and ecosystem, and is well-positioned to support AIR developers moving forward.

HARMAN (a wholly‐owned subsidiary of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.) designs and engineers connected products and solutions for automakers, consumers, and enterprises worldwide. HARMAN’s software services power billions of mobile devices and systems that are connected, integrated and secure across all platforms, from work and home to car and mobile. Adobe has a long history collaborating with HARMAN, which is a key partner for Flash runtime migration and enterprise support as companies transition their existing ActionScript and Flex applications to new technologies. HARMAN has also been supporting customers with bespoke versions of Adobe AIR for the past decade.

Adobe will provide basic security support – limited to security fixes only for desktop platforms (Windows 7 and above, and Mac OS X) – for Adobe AIR v32 until the end of 2020. After that time, Adobe support for AIR will be discontinued and ongoing support will be managed by HARMAN and communicated by them directly. However, beginning with the release of AIR v33 by HARMAN, developers should contact HARMAN directly for AIR support on both mobile and desktop platforms – including bug fixes, platform compatibility, and new and improved functionality.

This means HARMAN will now control the future of the AIR platform and I would certainly expect Adobe tools to complete the transition away from supporting Flash, removing a great deal of the developer appeal in the first place.  You can learn more about HARMAN’s future plans for the Flash/AIR platform here.

GameDev News


30. May 2019


GDevelop, the open source beginner friendly 2D game engine, just released beta 70.  We recently mentioned GDevelop in our Codeless Game Engines article and have previously covered it in depth in this video.


There are no formal release notes, just this tweet:

image


The star feature of this release is certainly the ability to create custom behaviors using the build in event system, in addition to the existing JavaScript method.  Details on creating custom behaviors is available here.  GDevelop is available for Mac, Windows and Linux and can be downloaded here.

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