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13. July 2019


Although Godot gained C# support with the release of Godot 3.0, it was missing support for key platforms, specifically mobile and browsers.  News from the Godot website indicates that Godot will receive C# support on the Android platform starting with Godot 3.2, thanks in a large part to a funding grant by Microsoft.

From the news entry by Ignacio Roldán Etcheverry:

Today I'm glad to announce we've finally made it happen. Godot 3.2 will ship with support for exporting C# games to the Android platform.

The process of exporting a game for Android with C# is the same as it would be if you were using GDScript. Godot will make sure to add all the assemblies and dependencies to the exported APK. No extra steps are required from you.

It supports all target ABIs Godot does (armeabi-v7a, arm64-v8a, x86 and x86_64). Currently, we only use JITed code, with AOT support coming in the future.

If you want to try Android C# support with Godot you need to build it yourself until the 3.2 release occurs.  Details of building with Mono support are available here.


They also discuss the future plans:

The next step in the roadmap is integration with the MonoDevelop IDE. More details will come in the next devblog, in a bit less than a month. You can expect much awaited features like debugging as well as better experience for opening files with this IDE (currently we use the command line with bad results). Thanks to the editor re-write, this will be a much easier task.

If you're wondering about support for WebAssembly and iOS or integration with Visual Studio and VS Code, don't fear. Those are all on the roadmap. You can expect to hear more about them in the future.

Learn more in the video below.

GameDev News


11. July 2019


Blender have just released the first, and hopefully only, release candidate for Blender 2.80.  Assuming no major show stopping bugs are found in the release candidate, Blender 2.80 final release should be just around the corner!  You can download the release candidate here

EDIT: The download link is now available right here.

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Blender 2.80 has spent over 4 years in development and is absolutely packed with new features.  The star of the show is EEVEE, the new real-time viewport renderer, but other major features include massively improved 2D creation and animation tools, Cycles renderer improvements and of course a completely new UI.

To learn more about Blender 2.80 be sure to check out the Blender 2.80 launch page.  Much more in-depth details of the thousands of new features in Blender 2.80 are available in the extensive release notes.  Or you can simply watch the video below!

Stay tuned for more in-depth coverage when Blender 2.80 is finally released in the coming days!

Art GameDev News


10. July 2019


There is a new Humble Bundle of interest to game developers, specifically Unity game developers.  This is the Humble Unity Game Development Bundle, and it consists of a collection of Udemy courses by GameDev.tv, mostly on the subject of Unity, although a few other topics such as Git and Blender are also covered.  As always the bundle is organized into tiers, where if you buy a more expensive tier, you get all of the content at the lower tiers. 

The tiers in this bundle consist of:

1$ Tier

  • How to Get A Job in the GameDev Industry
  • Finish It! Motivation and Processes for Game & App Development


20$ Tier

  • Locked content Blender Environment Artist
  • Git Smart: Learn Git The Fun Way With Unity Games


25$ Tier

  • Complete C# Unity Developer 3D
  • RPG Core Combat Creator
  • Complete C# Unity Developer 2D
  • Locked content Unity 3D Game Kit - Make Games Without Coding


All contents in the bundle consist of Udemy product keys, so you need to have a Udemy account and you have to redeem the keys within a year of purchasing.  As always you can decide how your money is allocated, between Humble, the publisher, charity and if you so choose (and thanks if you do!) to support GFS.  The bundle is available here, you can learn more by watching the video below.

GameDev News


9. July 2019


Today we are taking a look at a free, cross-platform (Mac, Windows & Linux) texturing tool from Agisoft called De-Lighter.  The purpose is all in the name, it’s for removing the effects of lighting from a texture.  This is useful in removing specular highlights or shadows from a texture captured via photography or 3D scans via photogrammetry such as using Meshroom.

The workflow is simple enough, you enter a 3D object in a variety of 3D formats with the original texture applied.  You then mark the areas that are influenced by light and the areas that are shadowed and De-Lighter takes care of the rest.  This leaves you with a texture that is then light neutral for use in your own lighting set up, be it a 3D renderer or a real-time game engine.  Thanks to 80.lv for the heads up on this release.

De-Lighter is available for download, completely free and no registration required, right here.  Watch the video below to see De-Lighter in action.

GameDev News Art


7. July 2019


Quadplay, a fantasy console by CasualEffects, was just released for free, open sourced under the LGPL3 license.  Fantasy consoles are virtual consoles, often with specifications similar to classic hardware such as NES or Gameboy, often with a easy to use programming language, and Quadplay is no exception.

The specifications of the virtual hardware is as follows:

  • 60 fps @ 384 x 224 pixels = 12:7 aspect ≈ 16:9.3
  • 4096 sRGB (4:4:4) colors
  • Hundreds of built-in sprites, sounds, and fonts
  • Program in PyxlScript, a friendly Python-like language
  • Order-independent 4-bit (16-level) alpha transparency
  • Native 2.5D graphics via z-order
  • 9.4 MB of total sprite memory
  • Up to 64 sprite and font sheets of up to 1024x1024
  • Four 10-button gamepads (D-pad + ⓐⓑⓒⓓ + ⓟⓠ)
  • Optional 192 x 112, 128 x 128, and 64 x 64 screen modes
  • Free and open source

The console and programming environment is remarkably well documented.  The source code for quadplay is available on GitHub.  The name CasualEffects may seem familiar, they are also responsible for the G3D Innovation Engine we covered earlier, as well as the simpler Nano Jammer virtual console, among other projects.

Check out quadplay in action in the video below.

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