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14. April 2019


Raytracing was one of the stars of GDC 2019 this year, with both Unreal and Unity announcing DXR support.  Unreal Engine support was available almost immediately with the release of Unreal Engine 4.22.   Unity users on the other hand have to wait quite a bit longer, with the first official release coming in Fall of 2019 or later.  Fortunately for the impatient Unity have released a highly experimental Unity build with raytracing support. 

You can download the experimental build from Github here with compiled zipped binaries available here.  To fully make use of this version you need to have Windows 10 version 1809 or higher installed as well as an RTX card (even with the updated drivers from NVIDIA, this install will not work on 10 series cards, unlike Unreal Engine). 

If you are interested in learning how Unity deals with real-time raytracing, you can download the PDF documentation right here.



GameDev News


12. April 2019


At GDC 2019, real-time raytracing was one of the marquee features.  Unreal was the first to market with DXR support added to Unreal Engine 4.22.  Unfortunately it also required you to have one of the newest generation video cards, an RTX 2060, 2070 or 2080.  Thankfully Nvidia also announced at GDC that they would be bringing DXR support to some older GeForce 10 series cards based on the Pascal architecture.   Does this mean you can now do real-time raytracing development on a older Nvidia GPU?  Let’s find out!

There are a few requirements before you can start:

  • an Nvidia 1060 6GB, 1070 or 1080 card (or of course a RTX 2060+ card)
  • Unreal Engine 4.22 or newer
  • Nvidia Drivers, 425.31 ore newer
  • Windows 10 Build 1809 or later

Be sure to launch Unreal Engine using the –dx12 flag, then enable raytracing in the project settings, the full process is documented here.  Watch the entire process and the mixed results in the video below.

So can you do raytracing in Unreal Engine using older cards?  Yes, yes you can… but the results aren’t perfect as of yet.  Once you have your raytraced project up and running, check here for documentation on how to configure raytracing in your project.

General


11. April 2019


One of the most requested Godot tutorials I get is to cover how to export models from Blender to Godot and retain textures, animations and more.  Therefore I have created exactly that tutorial in both video and text formats, hosted on our sister site devga.me.  This tutorial is mostly in Blender, showing how to properly configure textures, an armature and create NLA strips so when exported “it just works” in Godot.  This example uses Blender 2.79 and Godot 3.1.

Don’t forget, if you want to learn Godot we have a complete Godot 3.x tutorial series available here, a step by step creating a full 2D game tutorial available here.  We also have Blender tutorials available in our tutorial section that should get you up to speed using the popular open source 3D application.

Art Design


9. April 2019


The Blender Foundation recently released their new animated short Spring, a completely open film that is used to push development of Blender forward.  Along side the Spring release, they are also offering a free month when you sign up for the Blender Cloud service.  The Blender Cloud is a subscription service that helps support the development of Blender, while offering you several nice features including:

  • All of the assets used in their open films
  • Sample blend file to download and learn from
  • 1,500+ textures and dozens of HDR environment maps
  • Plugin to access the above resources
  • Dozens of high quality multi-part tutorials
  • Tools to share and collaborate with others on Blender Cloud

You can sign up here for €9.90 a month.  The first month will be free and you will not be billed until the 2nd month begins enabling you to try Blender Cloud for free.  To see inside the Blender Cloud service, check out the video below.

Art GameDev News


5. April 2019


Clickteam Fusion is an easy to use game engine behind games such as Five Nights at Freddie’s and The Escapists.  We previously featured Clickteam in our “Closer Look” CLickteamseries a few years back.  Clickteam Fusion 3.0 has been under development for several years now but Clickteam 2 just got a bit of an update to hold developers over until 3.0 ships.  The new update shipped as DLC on Steam as the Fusion 2.5+ DLC.

Details of the new DLC:

Clickteam Fusion 2.5+ enhances your existing copy of Clickteam Fusion 2.5 Standard or Developer (for PC or Mac) by providing some very powerful additional features and improving functions in several places.


Access the power of event editor with even more ease using child events in your projects, qualifiers in global events, customizable qualifiers and a global event list editor.


Improve the performances of your applications with new engine optimizations and a new Windows runtime using DirectX 11.


Debugging your application has never been easier with the addition of new features like the built in profiler that allows you to examine the time taken by each event line of your application. The resulting output allows you to detect any bottleneck in your events and optimize your application’s frame rate. Or the new Find All function that searches your entire application for your search criteria and provides a new output window with the results. Find what you are looking for in the list, click it to jump directly there!

You can learn more about the release on Steam here or on the Clickteam homepage available here.

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