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11. March 2019


The Haxe powered Heaps game engine just updated to version 1.6.0.  The Heaps game engine is a battle tested game engine responsible for such titles as Dead Cells, Northgard and Evoland.  It was created by the same developer as the Haxe language, Nicolas Cannasse.  The game engine is open source under the MIT license and is available on a number of different platforms including most modern game consoles.

The 1.6 release brings several new features, including:

2D:

  • added DomKit support
  • added h2d.Camera
  • review h2d filters wrt alpha handling
  • added h2d.Flow.layout
  • support for SDF fonts
  • support for sub pixel Tiles (various coordinates/sizes are now Float instead of Int)
  • added h2d.Interactive.onReleaseOutside and .shape for custom shape handling
  • h2d.Object.onParentChanged is now onHierarchyMoved
  • handle multiple Interactive onOver

3D:

  • added h3d.col.Capsule
  • added h3d.col.Collider.inSphere + changed inFrustum
  • added Driver.capturePixels sub region
  • added h3d.scene.MeshBatch
  • optimized shadows maps culling
  • optimized internal pass lists handling
  • moved h3d.scene.DirLight/PointLight/LightSystem/Renderer to h3d.scene.fwd package
  • more work on pbr renderer and terrain system
  • various optimizations (less allocations)

Other:

  • [js] heaps now defaults to canvas instead of window for events
  • review hxd.prefab.Prefab API
  • added mp3 sound support
  • added S3TC dds texture support
  • new samples : Camera2D, Domkit, Flows, FXView, Interactive2D, MeshBatch, Lights


If you are interested in learning Heaps, we have a few tutorials to get you started:

Additionally there is an excellent Database/Level editor for Haxe called CastleDB that you should certainly check out.

CastleDB Introduction

GameDev News


9. March 2019


After 11 quick beta releases, Godot 3.1 became one step closer to reality with the release of Godot 3.1 release candidate 1.  The release candidate is not meant for production work, but is instead intended to iron out last minute bugs before the full release.

Details of the release from the Godot blog:

After over one year of work, 5 alpha releases, 11 betas and 7000 commits by close to 500 contributors, we're finally ready to wrap up the 3.1 version and let you all benefit from the hundreds of new features, enhancements and bug fixes that have been worked on by the community since January 2018.

We're therefore publishing this first release candidate, Godot 3.1 RC 1, to let all of you test it thoroughly and check if any showstoppers remain. We might have several RC builds if need be while the last blockers get fixed, until we get one RC build that we consider ready to ship. After the two-month beta phase that we had with 11 releases and hundreds of bug fixes, the path to the stable release should be quite short.

Downloads of the release candidate are in a separate location from the mainline builds and are available here for GDScript only or here for Mono/C# builds.  There are a ton of new features coming in 3.1 as you can see from this in-progress release notes.

We have covered development versions of several of these new features already, including:

We will revisit the final form of these improvements when Godot 3.1 is released.  If you are interested in learning Godot, we’ve got you covered with this complete game step by step tutorial as well as our comprehensive Godot 3 video series.

GameDev News


8. March 2019


Diligent Graphics just released Diligent Engine 2.4b.  Diligent Engine is a cross platform open source rendering framework that abstracts away the details of the underlying OpenGL, Direct3D 11/12 and Vulkan renderers.  The 2.4b release brings the following major new features:

  • Added cmake options to disable specific back-ends and glslang
  • Improved engine support of GLES3.0 devices
  • Added new module – DiligentFX, a high-level rendering framework
    • Reworked light scattering post-processing effect to be ready-to-use component

Diligent Engine is available on GitHub under the Apache 2 open source license.  In terms of why you would choose Diligent Engine over other cross platform graphics libraries, here the advantages the framework offers:

  • Better abstractions (such as one monolithic pipeline state object vs numerous fine-grain states) that map directly to next-generation APIs and reduce run-time overhead
  • Explicit control of resource state transitions.
  • Efficient shader resource binding model that takes advantage of descriptor tables in Direct3D12 and descriptor sets in Vulkan.
  • Multithreaded command list recording.
  • HLSL (VS, PS, GS, DS, HS, CS) as common shading language on all platforms and back-ends.
  • Vulkan back-end.

To learn more about Diligent Engine, in addition to getting started with Diligent Engine, watch the video below.  To learn about other cross platform rendering frameworks, check here.

GameDev News


6. March 2019


Humble are running another Humble Bundle with software of use to game developers.  The new bundle is Humble Software Bundle: Your Beats. ACIDized.  Unlike most previous Humble bundles, this one is mostly about the top tier choices, ACID Pro 7 and Sound Forge 12.  ACID Pro is a seminal DAW(Digital Audio Workstation) for composing and creating audio, while Sound Forge is a swiss army knife for recording, capturing and editing audio files.

The tiers of this bundle are as follows:

$1 Tier

Music Maker EDM Edition

Soundpool – Trannce Masters

$12 Tier

MP3 Deluxe 19

Soundpool – Dream House

$25 Tier

ACID Pro 7

Sound Forge 12

Soundpool: Discharge


You can purchase the bundle and support charity and GameFromScratch at the same time by using this link.

GameDev News


6. March 2019


GAEA (not to be confused with GAIA for Unity), is a newly released terrain generation tool from QuadSpinner.  They describe GAEA as:

Gaea takes terrain design toe-to-toe with the rest of the CG landscape. Designed with artists and their vision in mind, Gaea brings together advanced toolsets in an easy-to-use package where you can get Hollywood quality results in minutes.

Using either a simple stack of nodes, or a more complex graph of nodes, you can easily compose primitive landscapes, apply millions of years of erosion and other modifiers, mix and match nodes to your hearts content, until you get the perfect terrain for your game.  The ultimate output from GAEA are height maps that can be used in almost any modern 3D game engine.  GAEA is available at a number of different price points, including a completely free but still usable for commercial projects tier.

image


GAEA is available for download on Windows PCs here.  For more details of GAEA, a getting started tutorial or just to see GAIA in action, watch the video below.

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