Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
18. September 2019


Unity Technologies have just released an amazing new package for the Unity game engine that enable you to stream a Unity game to multiple browsers, all synchronized, powered by the WebRTC standard.

Details from the Unity blog:

The power of WebRTC technologies lets you run Unity projects with high-quality rendering through your browser. The framework can be used in runtime or in the Editor, so it is useful for a variety of purposes, like running a car configurator made with HDRP or viewing an architectural model – projects that use high-end graphics.

WebRTC bridges the gap between browsers and real-time rendering

Developed by Google in 2011, WebRTC is open-source software that enables real-time peer-to-peer communication between browsers and mobile platforms. Any device can use Unity’s open-source framework for render streaming, so long as it’s equipped with the latest version of a browser that supports WebRTC. This includes all major browsers for iPad, iPhone, and Android.

WebRTC can be paired with Unity thanks to our app based on the Apache 2.0 license, which is publicly available through Github. This library is also available as a Preview release through Package Manager, to make it even easier to add it to your project.


The installation instructions are unfortunately lacking, missing a few key steps, such as the fact WebRTC isn’t actually available in the package manager nor what to do with the remote rendering archive.  Don’t worry they, we walk you through the process.

There are a few requirements though:

  • Windows Only for now
  • Current (very current!) NVIDIA drivers and a modern 1050+ GPU for the encoding to work
  • Unity 2019.1 or newer


Assuming you have all of those things, let’s begin.  First head here and download com.unity.renderstreaming-1.1.1-preview.tgz and com.unity.template.renderstreaming-1.1.1-preview.tgz.  Next head here and download com.unity.webrtc-1.0.1-preview.tgz(this is supposed to be in the package manager but currently isn't).


Now we need to copy these folders into our Unity install.  In the Unity Hub, click Installs, locate the installed version and click the triple dot at the top right and select Show In Explorer.

image


In Explorer, navigate to \Data\Resources\PackageManager.

Copy the RTC and renderstreaming tgz files into the Editor folder, while copying com.unity.template.renderstreaming-1.1.1-preview.tgz into the ProjectTemplates folder.

You may have to restart Unity Hub at this point.  Now in projects, with the version you just copied the files to selected, create a new project and the template should appear:

image


Select Unity Render Streaming Template and create a project.  Once in Unity you will have to go to the Package Manager and upgrade to HDRP requested as well as enable InputManager (make sure you have show preview packages enabled to locate it).


You can see Render Streaming in action in the video below, with additional instructions on how to get started!

GameDev News


17. September 2019


SHADERed is an awesome tool for authoring shaders interactively.  With the just released 1.2 version, SHADERed just got more capable, gaining the ability to create Compute shaders.

Details of the release:

  • add compute shaders
  • add empty image object
  • fix loading files from different drives on Windows
  • fix saving info about item opened in PropertyUI
  • fix "Show error list window when build finishes with an error" option
  • temporary fix for crash on float3(), float4(), etc


SHADERed is completely free and available for download for Linux and Windows here.  The project is open source under the MIT license.  We recently did a feature on SHADERed, so if you want to learn more about this excellent free tool, check out the video below.

GameDev News


16. September 2019


Today at CppCon, Microsoft announced they are open sourcing the Visual C++ implementation of the Standard Template Library.  Available now on GitHub and licensed under the Apache License v2.0 with LLVM Exceptions.

Details of why Microsoft have open sourced their STL implementation from the C++ team blog:

Q: Why are you doing this?

A: There are several reasons. Working on the STL in GitHub will allow our customers to follow our development as it happens, try out our latest changes, and help improve our pull requests by reviewing them. As C++ Standardization accelerates, with more large features being voted in every year, we believe that accepting major features as open source contributions will be important. (For example, C++20’s chrono and format libraries are potential candidates.) We also want to contribute back to the C++ community by making it possible to take our implementations of major features. (For example, C++17’s charconv.)

If you’re getting your hopes up that this is the first step in open sourcing more of Visual Studio, don’t get your hopes up too high!

Q: Are you going to open source anything else in the MSVC toolset?

A: We have no such plans. We chose the STL because it’s different from other MSVC libraries and the compiler. Specifically, the STL is fast-evolving and designed by the C++ Standardization Committee, unlike other MSVC libraries. (Being designed by Committee is an advantage for open sourcing! It means that we don’t need to spend any time and energy on feature design review. Implementation strategy and tactics are far more constrained, and therefore easier to review.) The STL is also relatively easy to contribute to, and somewhat loosely coupled, unlike the compiler (where, as a general rule, everything interacts with everything else).

(One exception: there are support libraries for the STL that we may open source in the future, but we have nothing to announce at this time.)

You can learn more about this open source release in the video below.

GameDev News


16. September 2019


Amazon have released a new version of the Lumberyard game engine.  This release includes 70+ features, changes and improvements.

Highlights of the release from the Lumberyard blog:

  • We continue to add new features and make workflow improvements to Script Canvas visual scripting to save you time. In this release, Script Canvas gets greater flexibility working with dynamic types, new comment and group presets so you can define color code comments and groups, and the ability to disable nodes so you can test different graph structures more quickly. We’ve also added three new nodes for increased functionality: Repeater, Switch, and Ordered Sequencer. (A few months ago we released the Project N.E.M.O sample to help you get started with Script Canvas. Check it out here.)
  • The EMotion FX Animation Editor can now dynamically simulate physically-based secondary animation for your actors. This lightweight solver provides realistic looking motion for items like backpacks, holsters, and even long hair, as your actor moves. Using the Simulated Objects node, you can adjust an objects stiffness, gravity factor, colliders, and more.
  • Lumberyard Beta 1.21 now uses NVIDIA’s PhysX 4.1. This latest version of PhysX boasts increased performance, stability, and accuracy.
  • We’ve also refactored Lumberyard’s cross-platform architecture. We removed heavy reliance on cascading platform #ifdefs by reorganizing platform-specific code into a parallel directory hierarchy. This makes cross-platform feature development and maintenance easier and also significantly reduces the effort required to add new platforms to Lumberyard. (Note that public APIs were not changed as part of this refactor.)

You can read full details of this release in the release notes available here or by watching the video below.  The example N.E.M.O demonstrated in the video below is available here.

GameDev News


14. September 2019


Every year Google sponsors the Summer of Code, a program that pays students to work on open source projects.  This year’s GSoC is over and the results are being released.  Earlier in the week the Godot game engine reported their results, yesterday Blender reported the results of the 7 projects undertaken in the 2019 summer of code.

The 2019 GSoC projects at Blender were:

More details about the entries are available of the Blender Developer blog or learn more by watching the video below.

GameDev News


GFS On YouTube

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List