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Godot Game Engine Tutorial Series

Welcome to the Godot Tutorial Series

Welcome to the GameFromScratch.com Godot tutorial series.  The Godot Engine is an open source, C++ based game engine for making 2D and 3D games for most mobile and desktop platforms.  The editor can be run on Windows, Mac and Linux.  This series will hopefully cover all aspects of Godot game development.

 

Where it makes sense to do so, I will be doing both a text and video tutorial for each section.  The links below will lead to HD versions of the video as well as the blog post, which will also contain all the source code and assets used.

 

If there is something specific you want to see covered, please ask below. To begin, simply expand a link below!

 

A Closer Look at the Godot Game Engine

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

Never heard of Godot and want to know what’s included?  Then this is the perfect place to start!  We take an indepth look of the features available in Godot and a basic overview of how things work.  This was technically written/recorded before the tutorial started, but should still be useful to people interested in learning more about Godot.

Your First Godot Application

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we create our very first Godot application. We create the manditory Hello World application, but with a bit of a twist. In addition to learning how a Godot application is structured, we learn how to create Nodes, wire up a script and handle connections.

2D Scenes, Sprites, Coordinates and Viewports

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we start to look at 2D graphics in Godot. Starting off with creating a Sprite and loading a texture. We then jump in to the 2D interface and discuss the viewport and coordinate systems.

Program Lifecycle and Input Handling

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we look at the typical program lifecycle of a Godot game, breaking down how the game loop works.  We show how to register a node for updating, then cover how to deal with input, both event driven and polled, then finally using an InputMap.

Playing SoundFX and Music

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we look at the how you play sound fx (samples) and music (streams) in the Godot game engine. We start by importing WAVs to create a sample library, then look at playing sound fx, then background music.

GUI Programming. Using Controls, Widgets and Containers

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we explore using the UI controls included in Godot.  There are a number of UI widgets included as well as a number of containers for arranging controls.  Godot Engine makes it very easy to create complicated UI applications.

Handling Multiple Scenes and Global Data

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we look at the process of switching between scenes in Godot. We also look at strategies for handling global data.

Collision Detection and Physics Simulation

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we discover how to test for collision between objects in Godot. We then go much deeper and look at using the underlying Physics Engine to add motion to our game.

Creating 2D level using Tilemaps

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we explore the process of creating a tileset including physics information. We then use that tilemap to create a simple level.

Sprite Animation

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

This tutorial covers the use of AnimatedSprite, a class that enables you to create a sprite with multiple frames of animation. We do a quick code sample illustrating how to animate between frames.

Keyframe Animation

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

This tutorial looks at Godot's built in keyframe animation system, enabling you to animate just about anything over time.

2D AI -- Navigation, NavMesh and Path Following

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

This tutorial explores two tasks critical for AI development, path following and navigation.

2D Particles

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

This tutorial illustrates how to use 2D particle systems in Godot. We create both a realistic flame effect as well as a flock of birds, both using particles.

Viewports and Cameras

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

This tutorial shows you how viewports and cameras work and is important in understand how to make your game run on multiple device resolutions.

Beginning 3D

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we start looking at 3D development using Godot engine. We start by learning to navigate the 3D editor, then look at creating lights, cameras and more.

Static and Procedural 3D Meshes

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

Now we look at loading static meshes in OBJ format. Additionally we look at two different ways to create procedural meshes in code.

Using Animated 3D Models(COLLADA)

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this section we look at loading more complex COLLADA meshes in Godot. We then look at the process of cutting up and playing back animations.

3D Raycasting

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we look at 3D ray casting, an essential feature for 3D vision and AI.

2D Lighting

Click here to watch in YouTube Click here for blog post

In this tutorial we look at creating 2D lights, light occluders and masking for Fog of War like effects.





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Corona Labs Acquired by Perk
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30. November 2015

Corona Labs, makers of the popular Lua based game engine CoronaSDK have been acquired by Perk a mobile rewards provider.

From the Corona blog:

Today, I’m really happy to announce that Corona and the team are joining Perk.

Perk is a publicly traded, profitable company that has built a service/platform that rewards people for everyday mobile and internet activities. Their goal is to enable developers like you to leverage their rewards system and advertiser relationships to both monetize and engage your users.

Having gone through multiple acquisitions (most recently with Fuse), I can tell you that this is really good news for Corona.

The key thing for me is that Perk builds and publishes apps — and more importantly — their engineers are huge Corona fans! They’ve built several apps with Corona already and at a fundamental level understand what makes Corona so special.

In fact, when we first met, they told us that it took them 3 months for their team to build an Android app natively. In contrast, one of their developers who had never used Corona before was able to port this app to Corona in 1 month!

The teams on both sides have been talking about a lot of different activities that are going to make this combination really great. And when I look at the conversations that the engineers are having on both sides, it’s clear they talk the same language: no nonsense, let’s get sh*t done.

* * *

This has been an incredible year for Corona.

As I look back at the agenda and themes we set for 2015, I’m extremely happy that we accomplished nearly all of it. The list is really quite extensive: Mac App, Win32 App, Corona Store, Lua-based plugins, custom shader effects, tvOS, etc.

On top of that, we now have a tremendous partner in Perk. They are excited about Corona at all levels of the company. They see value in what the team here does, in what you the community do with Corona, and in what Perk/Corona will be able to do together. The fact that they already build many of their own apps with Corona makes this transition so natural.

Because of all this, I feel like Corona is in the best shape it’s ever been. So I’ve decided this is a really great time to take a step back from my day-to-day role. Moving forward, I’ll be taking on the role as advisor to Perk/Corona Labs.

Pixar co-founder, Ed Catmull, talked a lot about how they built something that is self-sustaining — that will outlive the founders — in his book “Creativity, Inc.” In particular, he highlights the key role that the braintrust plays in that.

Well, the Corona team is my braintrust. These guys are rockstars. I credit them for what makes Corona so special and for why Corona has helped you all build such great apps.

I sometimes wondered if I would ever feel comfortable stepping away from the “captain’s chair”. Not anymore. The team has already stepped up and grown in so many ways. It’s time to take the training wheels off, so that they can continue to grow.

While I won’t be working side-by-side with the team on a daily basis anymore, I hope you’ll join me in cheering them from the sidelines.

Finally, as my last official act, I wanted to thank you — the community — for believing in what we are doing here with Corona. I hope I’ve played a small part in making a positive dent in your universe. I wish you all the best!

Walter

 

It will be interesting to see what, if any, effect this has on the Corona SDK and it’s community.  I covered Corona along side Gideros, Moai and Love in the Battle of the Lua Game Engines a few years back and at that point the Lua based game engines were all but owning the mobile space.  Since then Gideros has gone open source, Moai effectively disappeared and Corona went free just a short while back.  Amazing how fast the gamedev world can change!

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