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14. January 2012

 

 

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One of the biggest stumbling blocks for people learning to create games is the required mathematics.  A common question people ask is where is the best place to learn, the KhanAcademy is certainly a very good place to start.

 

 

They literally have thousands of video tutorials, over a wide variety of subjects including thousands of math specific tutorials.  Covering the gamut from early grade school up to university level topics.  Best of all it is completely free.  In their own words:

 

The Khan Academy is an organization on a mission. We're a not-for-profit with the goal of changing education for the better by providing a free world-class education to anyone anywhere.

All of the site's resources are available to anyone. It doesn't matter if you are a student, teacher, home-schooler, principal, adult returning to the classroom after 20 years, or a friendly alien just trying to get a leg up in earthly biology. The Khan Academy's materials and resources are available to you completely free of charge.

 

 

Here is an example video on vector dot product.

 



 

 

So, if you are looking for a great place to pick up some math ( or chemistry, SAT, art history… ) skills, the KhanAcademy is a very good place to start.

Cool Thing of the Week

4. January 2012

 

 

 

Mobile development is certainly hot these days and as a result a number of mobile frameworks have popped up allowing you to target multiple devices with a single code base.  Problem is, it’s not just one or two frameworks we are talking about, more like 20 or 30, maybe even more!   Trying to pick the right one is a simply daunting task!  You need to factor a number of things in such as quality, features available,  price, languages supported and perhaps most important of all, the platforms supported.

 

 

 

Fortunately there is a tool that can greatly help.  This handy matrix at markus-falk.com breaks down many of the available mobile frameworks.  Down the left hand side are all of the various Frameworks, then across the top are the platforms they support, the languages you can program in, the features they support ( such as Accelerometer, Camera, etc.. ), as well as if it is freely available and if it is open source.

 

 

 

Snapshot of a portion of the matrix:

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He also provided a handy filtering tool, oddly named “Start Wizard”.  You can check off your criteria here and it will dynamically update the matrix to include only the frameworks that meet your criteria.  Here is the wizard in action:

 

 

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Simply click the features you require, hit Find Framework and PRESTO!  a list of Frameworks compatible with your selection.   The list is by no means perfect.  First off, it is very iOS centric, but given that iOS is possibly the most popular OS for mobile development, I suppose this makes sense.   Perhaps most glaringly, it doesn’t tell you if the framework can target PC, Linux or Mac, which is a shame as that is a very important detail to many people ( myself included ).  Finally there are frameworks missing ( again, this goes back to the iOS centric aspect ), such as mobile web apps like Flash and Silverlight, or projects like MonoGame and ExEn.  Additionally all the C++ specific frameworks like SIO or Marmalade are absent as well.  I can understand why Flash and Silverlight would be left out, but then why was jQuery included?

 

 

 

 

Faults aside, this handy tool provides a wonderful starting point if you are looking for a cross platform mobile framework.  Even better, much of the results are populated programmatically, so the data should stay fairly relevant as time goes on.  Just be sure to keep in mind, other options exist!

 

 

 

So go ahead and check it out.

Cool Thing of the Week ,

29. December 2011

 

 

 

This week’s cool thing isn’t new, not even close in fact.  It is actually 3 years old and has a fewimage thousand alternatives, also freely available.  So then, why the hell am I show casing it?  Frankly because a) it’s damned good work b) programmers are always looking for alternatives to programmer art and this is the perfect source!

 

 

Without further ado, let me present to you a Free Airplane Sprite Pack (download link). Years ago, 2008 in fact, Gamedev user Prinz Eugn released a selection of hand painted airplane sprites for free use in this thread.  I mention it again because the links have recently been re-established.  The work is very good, much better than a lot of freely available sprite art and includes a number of angles and frames to work with.  Below is one such sample sprite sheet:

 

 

image

 

So, if you are looking at creating a 2D game and are looking for some artwork to start out with, this is a very good place to start.  It is a lot easier to keep yourself motivated when your game looks good.

 

Again, the download link.

 

 

EDIT: As was rightly pointed out in the comments, there is a condition on using the sprites.  If you use them in a released product, contact and credit the author.  I think you will agree this is a very small thing to ask.  For more details on the author, you can see more of his work here or you can ( or at least, could ) email him at prinz_eugn [@] hotmail.com.  Frankly, if you use his sprites even in a non-shipping project, I highly recommend you send him even just a quick "thanks man!" email.  In running this site I have received some of those and I can't begin to explain how nice they are to receive. 

 

 

 

 

 

Cool Thing of the Week

19. December 2011

 

 

In the process of scouring the net, either out of my own interest, as research for possible articles or as part of my own development process, I come across tons of absolute gems.  This new weekly column is going to be showcasing these various sites of interest, I hope you find them as interesting as I do!

 

I spend a lot of time on the web, but I can’t be everywhere!  So if you came across a really cool site, project, game or something else that you think will be of interest to a bunch of game developers, let us know and it may be featured as a future cool item.  This is all about raising exposure to items that might be of interest to your fellow developer!

 

 

 

 

Now, let me introduce the first ever Cool Thing of the Week!

 

EbonyFortress.com – List of free game development libraries

 

 

 

There are an absolute ton of free libraries out there covering all facets of game programming.  One of the biggest problems is a matter of finding them!  Often times, Google provesEbonyFortress completely useless and forum links you may come across have long since been abandoned, leading you to page after page of dead links.  Today’s entry really isn’t all that much of an exception, as it hasn’t been updated in close to a year.  That said, it is still perhaps the most timely and complete list of free game related libraries I have ever found.

 

 

This site breaks entries down into their general category ( 3D Graphics, 2D Graphics, Sound/Music, Networking, Video, Compression, Artificial Intelligence, Math/Physics, Scripting, etc. ), each entry contains a link to the library as well as the license it was released under ( such as GPL, MIT ).  There are a ton of entries, well over a hundred and from my own experiences I would say it is pretty comprehensive.  All the libraries I could think to look up were represented on this list, although in a few cases things weren’t where I initially expected them ( such as SFML being under general purpose instead of 2D graphics, although that location makes perfect sense as well. )  There are some entries in there I would probably prune due to their age ( such as Hexen 2 or Genesis ) and I would love to see an indicator to show if thee libraries are still under active development.  These small quibbles aside, the list is nearly perfect.

 

 

So, if you find yourself looking for a free library for just about any aspect of game development, this page is a very good place to start!  I can only hope the author continues to update it, to keep it the wonderful resource it currently is!






Stay tuned for next weeks CTotW! Again, we look forward to your recommendations so let us know!. We will be keeping an active archive here, which admittedly is a bit empty now. Comments of course are open on this post as well, let us know your opinion of the sites we choose! Got another similar recommendation, found it useful, didn't find it useful? Let us know in the comments below.

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Visual Studio 2015 Service Pack 1 Released
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30. 十一月 2015

 

The Visual Studio team at Microsoft just released Service Pack 1 for Visual Studio 2015.  The editor now supports several more languages such as Go, Swift and Ruby, command line REPL for C#, new NuGet and .Net releases and more.  From the announcement blog post:

  • New Visual Studio Icon. Responding to your feedback on UserVoice, we’ve tweaked the Visual Studio 2015 icon in Update 1 to make it easier to differentiate visually between multiple versions of Visual Studio running side by side on the same machine:
    New icon for Visual Studio
  • .NET Framework 4.6.1. Visual Studio 2015 Update 1 includes the latest version (4.6.1) of the .NET Framework. You can read about all the new features on the .NET blog.
  • Editor support for new languages. The Visual Studio editor now provides built-in syntax highlighting and basic IntelliSense support for languages including Go, Java, Perl, R, Ruby, and Swift. We support the TextMate bundle
    model for language grammars and snippets, allowing you to extend this with support for other languages.
    Editor support for new languages (showing R)
  • IncrediBuild-Visual Studio partnership. With this collaboration and at no additional cost, developers can use IncrediBuild’s build engine to lay out build plans for their applications with more parallelized execution of the build. This leverages hardware resources more effectively and provides monitoring to identify bottlenecks and better understand resource usage. For complete details, see the post, Improving your build times with IncrediBuild and Visual Studio 2015.
  • Tools for Universal Windows Apps v1.2. This update enables you to build and submit apps to the Windows Store targeting Windows 10 SDK Version 1511. It includes several developer productivity improvements to .NET Native, the XAML designer, the manifest designer, Windows Store packaging, and the debugger in this release. If you don't already have Tools for Universal Windows Apps installed, you can enable them by modifying the Visual Studio 2015 installation, or directly installing them from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=619614.
  • Native support for behaviors in Universal Windows apps. Behaviors are an easy way of adding common interactivity to your XAML apps without having to add more imperative code. These are natively supported in Update 1, shipping as a NuGet Package (available for both managed and native projects), and accepting contributions as an open source project. The package can also be installed through the Blend Assets Pane (under “Behaviors”). Learn more from theXAML Behaviors, open source and on UWP post on the Windows Developer blog, start contributing by visiting theGitHub page, or request features by raising issues.
  • MSTest and CodeCoverage support for ASP.NET 5. The Visual Studio testing tools now support MSTest framework-based tests for ASP.NET 5 applications and add support for CodeCoverage with ASP.NET 5 on x86/x64 platforms targeting the CoreCLR/CLR. The MSTest framework components are available from the NuGet gallery.
  • Parallel Test Execution: The Visual Studio testing tools introduce support for parallel execution of test cases leveraging the available cores on the machine, with Test Explorer indicating the progress of parallel tests. The test execution engine is launched on each available core as a distinct process, and is given a container (assembly, DLL, or relevant artifact) with the tests to execute according to the semantics of the test framework. VS supports parallel execution through all launch points (e.g. the command line and IDE commands like Test Explorer, CodeLens, and various “Run” commands). For details on how to enable this feature, refer to the Release Notes.
    Parallel Test Execution feature showing tests running at the same time
  • C# Interactive Window and command-line REPL. We’ve added more functionality and fixed a number of bugs in these features that first appeared in the CTP. For RTM we’ve also cleaned up some of the command-line argument handling as described in the detailed notes on GitHub. (Note that NuGet support and the VB scripting API are not available with this release, but we’re still actively working on them. In the meantime, you can play with the C# scripting API available on GitHub.)
  • Managing analysis issues. We’ve heard from many customers that when they install a Roslyn analyzer from NuGet or Visual Studio Extensions, thousands of code analysis issues end up showing up in the Error List, leading them to abandon the analyzer. With this update you can now suppress all current issues to a global suppression file, view and manage baselined issues (to audit suppressions or review baselined issues), show analysis warnings and messages for only ‘my code changes,’ and remove duplicate instances of warnings in the error list to focus results to the unique set.
    Managing analysis issues
  • NuGet and NuGet Package Manager. NuGet 3.3 is now bundled with Update 1, and we’ve made a number of changes to the NuGet Package Manager interface including a tab-based UI to help filter groups of packages, action buttons in the package list for quick access to common management functions, a Consolidate tab for packages you work with at the solution level, and an Update tab that allows you to select and update multiple packages together.
    Updated NuGet package manager
  • Visual Studio license improvements. Signing in to unlock the IDE with your subscription is one of those features that you do not want to see interrupting your workflow. Towards this goal, Update 1 has improvements that will ensure the IDE stays unlocked for a year or more after signing in as long as you have regular access to the internet to keep the license renewed in the background. More improvements to reduce sign ins are still to come.

Full details are available in the release notes.  I know I’m installing right away, but that’s mostly because I found Visual Studio 2015 to be a bit of a mess, so I’m hoping this is an improvement and I can move up from VS2013 finally!

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