Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon

15. December 2016

 

Welcome to the next part in the ongoing Closer Look At game engine series.  The Closer Look series combines a review, overview and getting started tutorial in one and aims to give a developer a good idea ofs2closerlook a given game engine is a good fit for them or not.  Today we are looking at the S2Engine, which is a commercial game engine available for purchase on Steam.  Right off the hop the S2Engine is going to have two major strikes against it for many game developers.  First, it’s Windows only.  Figured I’d get the out of the way right up front as if you are looking to create cross platform games, this is not the engine for you.  Second, it’s commercial and closed source, although the price tag is quite low at around $20USD.

 

As always there is an HD video version of this review available here.

 

Without further ado, let’s jump in to the S2Engine.

 

The Tools

The entire development experience in the S2Engine takes place in the S2EngineHD Editor.  Here is the editor in action running the included sample scene:

s1

 

The S2Engine Editor is absolutely loaded with tools, lets take a guided tour.  First off we have the scene window where you can see a live rendering of your game in action:

sceneoptimized

 

Please keep in mind the fuzziness in the picture above comes from the animated gif process, the real-time viewport looks vastly superior to the image above.  The Scene view is where you place entities in your scene and preview the results.

 

You can switch between the various available tools using the following toolbar:

image

Or via menu:

image

 

The Project Window

image

 

This is where the various assets of your game are organized.  It’s an analog to the underlying file system of your project.  The buttons across the left enable you to filter the various different objects ( Animations, Models, FSMs, etc ).

 

The Class Window

image

 

This is where you can instance various game objects.  Select an object, click Create and then click within the scene to place the entity.  The newly created entity (or a selected entity) can then be configured using the lower Params window, which is context sensitive to the selected object.

 

Terrain Tools

image

 

S2Engine has a full terrain editing system in.  The Terrain tool enables you to interactively edit the scenes landscape (height map).  There are tools for raising/lowering, flattening, stepping and painting terrain as well as drawing roads and vegetation.  The actual editing is done in the scene window:

terrain

 

Model Window

image

 

S2Engine supports 3D animated models of FBX format, simply click the Import button in the Project view:

image

 

There are multiple different panels for configuring models, setting and handling animations, managing joints/bones and even vertex level manipulations.

image

 

There is also an animation panel.

image

This enables you to blend animations together, set and remove animation keys and of course, preview animations.

 

Material Window

imageimage

 

A detailed material system allowing multiple layers.  You can control diffuse and normal maps, UV tilting, lighting properties and more.  You also have control over detailed material attributes like alpha blending, animations, scattering, light emission and more.

 

Special FX

image

 

Fine tuned control over multiple special FX of types weather, post processing and environmental.  Fine tune control over all aspects, including water fx, sky, weather, lens effects, etc.  You also have fine tune control over day/night cycles using a keyframe system:

image

 

Cutscene Tool

image

 

S2Engine has a complete system in place for authoring cut scenes.  Includes a curve editor:

image

 

As well as a detailed timeline:

image

 

Hierarchy

image

This is essentially your scene graph.

 

Font Tool

image

Enables you to create png textures for fonts of varying dimensions with font preview.  Fonts are imported in fnt format created using the BMFont tool.

 

GUI Editor

image

Currently in Beta, there is a UI editor available.  You can create a hierarchy of UI widgets and configure them using the Params class panel.

 

imageimage

Currently supported widgets include button, slider, frame, input box, combobox, label, checkbutton, colorbox, image, listbox, groupbox, tabbox and rangeinputbox.

 

Publishing

When you are complete publishing is a pretty straight forward process.  This is one of the advantages of only supporting a single platform publishing is as simple as choosing a file name, starting scene, main script (entry point) and a few other settings and clicking the Publish button.

image

 

Coding

There are two ways to code in S2Engine.  You can use their own scripting language or the visual FSM (Finite State Machine) visual programming language.  The scripting language has the sc2 extension and has a C like syntax.  You can read the language reference here while the API documentation is available here.  Scripts are simply connected to (and thus control) game objects.  Here is an example script that controls a jeep found in the demo game.

#message TakeControl
#message LeftControl
#message LockWaypoints
#message UnlockWaypoints

#use "engine.wav"

var float acc;
var float steer;
var bool brake;
var bool control;
var float steerAng;
var string steerNode;
var string handsNode;
var float oldsteerAng;
var bool _on;

function void Init()
{
	_on=false;
	control=false;
	steerAng=0.0;
	steerNode="steer";
	handsNode="hands";
	AICreateObject(false,false,205.0,200.0);
	resetNodeFlags("camera","visible");
	resetNodeFlags("hands","visible");
	SetSource(10.0,15000.0);
}

function void PostInit()
{
	SetPerObjectMaterialData(3,0.0);
	resetNodeFlags("light01","visible");
	resetNodeFlags("light02","visible");
	_on=false;
}

function void update()
{
	if(control==true)
	{
		acc=0.0;
		steer=0.0;
		brake=false;
		RotateNode(steerNode,"rgt",-steerAng);
		RotateNode(handsNode,"rgt",-steerAng);
		
		SetSourcePitch((PhysicsGetVehicleRPM()*0.0025)+1.0);
		/*LOG( string(PhysicsGetVehicleRPM()) );*/
		
		if(IsKeyPressed("w"))
		{
			acc=1.0;
		}
		if(IsKeyPressed("s"))
		{
			acc=-0.5;
		}
		oldsteerAng=steerAng;
		if(IsKeyPressed("d"))
		{
			steerAng=steerAng+(frametime);
			steer=-1.0;
		}
		else
		{
			if(IsKeyPressed("a"))
			{
				steerAng=steerAng-(frametime);
				steer=1.0;
			}
			else
			{
				steerAng=0.0;
			}
		}
		if(IsKeyPressed(" "))
		{
			brake=true;
		}
		if(steerAng>=35.0)
		{
			steerAng=35.0;
		}
		if( steerAng<=(-35.0) )
		{
			steerAng=-35.0;
		}
		steerAng=ScalarInterpolate(oldsteerAng,steerAng,(frametime/200.0));	
		RotateNode(steerNode,"rgt",steerAng);
		RotateNode(handsNode,"rgt",steerAng);
		PhysicsVehicleControl(steer,acc,brake);
		
		if(acc!=0.0)
		{
			var vec3 fwdaxis;
			fwdaxis=GetWorldAxis("fwd");
			SendMessageMulti("pushOut",string(fwdaxis),400.0,"null");
		}
	}
	else
	{
		PhysicsVehicleControl(0.0,0.0,true);
		if(ObjectIsInRange("player01",300.0))
		{
			SendMessageSingle("player01","DriveVehicle","");
		}
	}
}

function void message()
{
	if( ReceivedMessage("TakeControl") )
	{
		/* lights control */
		var float tod;
		tod=float(GetLevelParam("TimeOfDay"));
		LOG("tod"+string(tod));
		if( (tod>=18.0) && (tod<=24.0) )
		{
			SetPerObjectMaterialData(3,1.0);
			if(!_on)
			{
				SetNodeFlags("light01","visible");
				SetNodeFlags("light02","visible");
				_on=true;
			}
		}
		if( (tod>0.0) && (tod<6.0) )
		{
			SetPerObjectMaterialData(3,1.0);
			if(!_on)
			{
				SetNodeFlags("light01","visible");
				SetNodeFlags("light02","visible");
				_on=true;
			}
		}
		if( (tod>6.0) && (tod<18.0) )
		{
			SetPerObjectMaterialData(3,0.0);
			ResetNodeFlags("light01","visible");
			ResetNodeFlags("light02","visible");
			_on=false;
		}
	
		/*=======================================0*/
		control=true;
		SetNodeFlags("hands","visible");
		PlaySound("engine.wav",true);
	}
	
	if( ReceivedMessage("LeftControl") )
	{
		control=false;
		ResetNodeFlags("hands","visible");
		StopSound();
		SetPerObjectMaterialData(3,0.0);
		ResetNodeFlags("light01","visible");
		ResetNodeFlags("light02","visible");
		_on=false;
	}
}

 

It’s a straight forward enough language, but I generally prefer that engines use an off the shelf scripting engine instead of rolling their own.  This gives the community access to a much larger source of expertise, sample code and generally is much more time tested and stable.  As you can see from the script above, much of the logic and communication is implemented via message passing.

The majority of in game programming however is done using FSM (Finite State Machines ) via the FSM graph.

s2

If you’ve ever worked in Blueprints in Unreal Engine or Flowgraph in CryEngine you should have a pretty good idea how FSM programming works.  You’re code responds to various events and creates program flows using a series of connecting cables to other states.  Each node can have multiple actions, configured like so:

s3

There are dozens of states available, and new ones can easily be created.

image

Variables are easily created as well.

image

In addition to local variables, parameters and globals can also be defined.

image

 

 

The Documentation, Community and Content

The S2Engine has a decent amount of documentation, reference materials, getting started videos and beginner projects.  There are however a few issues, the first of which is English.  The developers primary language is not English and it shows on occasion in the documentation.  The actual UI is very well translated but some of the documentation  is certainly a tad “Engrish”.  Worse, some of the linked starting videos aren’t in English at all.  I have no issue with non-English videos, but I would recommend not linking them directly from an English localized application.

In terms of actual available documentation, there is a Wiki available here, a very solid reference manual available here, and a series of video tutorials available here.  S2Engine also comes with the beginner scene you’ve seen throughout this review.

The community for S2Engine isn’t huge but there is an active forum.  There is also a Trello bug tracking board available on Trello as well as a few other community options.  One impressive thing about the engine is the engine developer is very responsive to user requests and feedback.

One interesting aspect of the S2Engine is the existence of Content DLC.  These are themed content packs you can download and use in your game.  Currently the only content pack is the Medieval content pack shown in the video below. There is another content DLC pack in the works.

 

 

Conclusion

I pointed out the two biggest negatives to this game engine in the very first paragraph.  It’s Windows only, both for tooling and target platforms.  It’s closed source and commercial.  For many those are going to be big enough deal breakers that nothing else really matters.  For the rest though, is this a worthwhile engine?  For a small team effort, there is a massive amount of functionality included in this engine, it’s capable of some staggeringly pretty results and the workflow, once understood, is pretty accessible to people with limited programming experience.

My biggest recommendation to the developer behind this engine is to make a proper demo available.  What will get people to use this engine over the other options is that they prefer the workflow, the tools, the built in assets, etc.  The lack of a current demo is going to vastly limit the potential audience.  Even with a low price tag, few people will spend money to evaluate an engine and having a previous weaker version of your engine available as the trial is certainly a mistake.  When you go to the download section of the website, you are greeted by this text:

NOTE: The version to be downloaded here (1.4.5) is a previous, very old, FREE BETA version. It is useful just for letting you to view How S2ENGINE HD is organized and How it works. It doesn’t represent the final quality of the 1.4.6 Steam version.

This is quite simply a mistake.  A demo is about selling people on your engine, so having them experience a “very old” version is a bad idea.  Always put your best foot forward when showing an engine.  I would recommend creating a version of the current engine that is full featured but either time locked, save limited or publish limited.  You will have a great many more developers willing to give your engine a try. 

I have found the performance to be a bit inconsistent.  I was running consistently at 70+ FPS, then struggled to hit 15FPS for a while with a ton of UI glitches.  Upgrading to the newest nVidia drivers didn’t help.  Then oddly, switching Optimus to use the integrated GPU, then back to dedicated seemed to fix the problems.  Hopefully these problems are localized to me and not widespread.  I wish the developers used a standard UI toolkit like Qt, as their custom implementation can be a bit buggy or not perform as you’d expect.  I also unfortunately experienced a half a dozen crashes while evaluating the engine, including one while making the video version of this review.

 

The Video

Programming , ,

8. October 2016

 

Welcome to the next chapter in the on-going Closer Look At game engine series.  The Closer Look series is aimed at informing you quickly if a given game engine is a good fit for you or not.  It’s a combination of overview, review and getting started tutorial that should give you a quick idea of a game engines strengths and weaknesses.  Today we are looking at Clickteam Fusion, a codeless game engine that has been around in one form or another for over 20 years.  I have to admit up front, this guide isn’t as in-depth as previous entries as I am rushing a bit to get it out to you.  This is because as ofctf25 publish date (Oct 6/2016) Clickteam Fusion 2.5 is heavily discounted in the Humble Bundle.

 

As always, there is an HD video version of this guide available here.

 

About Quickteam Fusion

 

Quickteam Fusion is a 2D cross platform game engine that takes a codeless approach in a similar vein as Construct2 or Stencyl.  First released as Klik and Play in 1995, it was later rebranded The Games Factory, then Multimedia Fusion then finally Clickteam Fusion.  Clickteam tools run on Windows, and via various add-ons and modules is capable of targeting Windows, iOS, Android, Flash, HTML5 and Mac OS.  Note that several of these modules have an additional price tag from the base package.  In terms of pricing, here is the current ( 10/6/2016 ) from Steam.

image

 

Please note however that those prices are in Canadian dollars.  Also Clickteam is frequently discounted up to 75% or more, so do not ever pay the full price.  The free version is mostly full functioning minus extensibility and the ability to generate a game that runs outside of Clickteam itself, along with a few in game resource limitations.  The Developer Upgrade removes the requirement to display that the game was authored in Clickstream ( via Splash screen, credits, etc ) as well as adding some more controls inside the engine, most of which aren’t game related.

 

There are some fairly successful games that have been authored using Clickteam Fusion, the most famous of which is the Five Nights at Freddy’s series.  Other games include The Escapists, Freedom Planet and a few dozen more games available on Steam, Google Play or the iOS App Store.  So this is a production ready game engine, although only suited for 2D games.

 

Inside Clickstream Fusion

 

The strength of Clickteam is certainly the tooling it comes with.  All work in Clickstream Studio is done in the editor:

image

 

One of the biggest faults against Clickstream has got to be it’s aging UI.  While not particularly attractive, it is for the most part effective.  On the left hand side you’ve got the Workspace Toolbar, which can be thought of as your scene graph.  “Scenes” in Clickstream are somewhat confusingly referred to as Frames.  You game is made up on one or more frames, and when you select a frame you see the level editor shown on the right.  This is used for placing and interacting the various items that compose your scene frame.  On the bottom left you see the Properties panel, this changes based on what object is currently selected.  Also shown here is the editor for Active objects.  Actives are very important to CTF as we will see shortly.  There are also windows for controlling layers, for selecting built in assets, etc.  Windows can be undocked, pinned and move about the interface easily.

 

CT1

 

The primary editing service can be used to easily create levels or maps via simple drag and drop.

CT2

 

You can also insert new items into the frame:

image

 

Then choose from the dozens of built-in object types available:

ctf3

 

Perhaps 90% of the time, what you are going to use is an Active object, which is essentially Clickteam’s version of Entity or Sprite.

image

 

Double click the newly created Active and you get the active editor:

image

 

This tool combines several different tools into one.  There is a full paint package in here with fairly advanced tooling.  There are tools for doing common tasks like setting the Active’s pivot point and direction of facing, and there are tools here for defining and previewing animations.

 

In addition to the built in objects, there are several other extensions that can be added using the Extensions manager:

image

 

Additionally Clickteam offer a store for additional extensions that are both freely available and for sale:

image

 

Confusingly there is no direct integration between the store and Clickteam.  Therefore you have to download and manually install extensions and assets purchased this way.  The Store’s contents are mostly free and also showcase games created using Clickteam, tutorials, game code and more.

 

“Coding” in Clickteam

At this point you should have a pretty good idea how you compose the assets of your game to create levels… how do you actually add some logic to it?  That is done using these four tools:

image

Left to right they are the Story Board editor, Frame Editor, Event Editor and Event List Editor.

 

Story Board Editor

image

This one is pretty simple.  It’s just a top level overview of the Frames that make up your game.  Remember your game is ultimately composed of multiple frames, like so:

image

 

Frame Editor

image

The Frame Editor is simple the level editor we’ve already taken a look at.

 

Event Editor

image

 

This is where the “coding” happens.  Essentially its a top down flow chart/graph of events that happen in your game and what those events happen to.  Here for example is the “code” to select a Flying Saucer Active in the game “Saucer Squad”:

image

On the left hand side are the events (38 and 39, 36 is a group heading and 37 is simply a comment).  That first event triggers when the user left clicks on the Saucer object.  The right handle side of the screen shows the action that occurs when that happens.

image

 

So for the event on Line 38, then the user clicks the left mouse button on Active type Saucer, it plays the sound sample Button_1, among other actions.  It’s essentially these events and actions you use to create your game.  Let’s create a very simple example… lets create an action that simple plays a sound effect when the frame (scene) is created.

First select Insert->Condition

image

 

This will bring up the conditions dialog:

image

 

In this case I clicked the Storyboard Controls (the chessboard/horse icon), then chose Start of Frame.  The creates a new action that will fire when the frame is started.  Now to the right hand side, select the space below the Speaker icon, like so:

image

 

Right click and all of the available options will be displayed:

image

 

Next the appropriate editor will be shown

image

 

Event List Editor

This editor performs the same functionality as the Event Editor, but instead of in a somewhat unwieldy grid view, it represents the events in a much more readable list form:

image

 

One last editor of note is the expression editor, for creating much more advanced logical conditions:

image

 

Individual entities within the frame can also have their own events, set in the properties panel of the selected item:

image

Clicking edit will bring you back to the exact same interface we just discussed.  Also in the properties panel you can define variables:

image

 

These values can then be interacted with in other event controllers.

 

Community and Documentation

Documentation in Clickteam is decent.  Built in there is an integrated CHM based help system, as well as 4 multipart tutorial games to get started.  There are also a wealth of tutorials available to download (mostly free) on the Clickteam store.  There are also a fair number of Clickteam tutorials on YouTube, although many of them are quite awful.  There is an active forum as well as a wiki.  All told, for every problem I faced, I found a solution quickly enough online.

 

Summary

So what ultimately do I think of Clickteam Fusion?  For the most part it is what it’s advertised to be, a code free 2D game creation kit able to target multiple platform.  There is of course a learning curve, but it’s a relatively short one.  As a code focused programmer, I don’t find the coding process extremely productive, but I can see how it would be so for a more visual oriented person and especially for a non-coder.  Clickteam tools are certainly getting a bit long in the tooth, a lot of the legacy cruft is showing it’s age and the UI could certainly use an update.  My biggest hesitation is wondering how well this development system would scale with system complexity.  If you’re game isn’t easily broken into scenes or is sprawling in complexity, I can see Clickteam becoming incredibly cumbersome.  That said, I think this is a successful all in one development tool that can take you a very far way in a very short period of time even with minimal to no development skill.

 

The Video

Programming, Design , ,

8. July 2016

 

Released just a few days ago on the App Store is Continuous, a complete C# and F# development environment that runs directly on your iPhone or iPad.  It contains a fairly full featured IDE with capable text editor, programming friendly on screen keyboard and more.  In addition to the editor it contains everything you need for development, a port of the Roslyn compiler, VM as well as implementations of several key libraries such as Xamarins WinForms implementation.

From the App Store entry:

    • Continuous is always building and running your code so you can see changes as you type. Writing interactive apps in Continuous is a pleasure compared to the traditional code-build-run cycle. It frees you to make lots of small changes and see their effects immediately - no more waiting for builds or deployments and no more clicking around trying to get to the screen you're trying to code.
      Continuous looks and works in many of the same ways as traditional .NET IDEs so you'll feel right at home, but it also strives to advance the state of the art in IDEs with these features:
    • Full C# 6 and F# 4 compilers so you can use the latest tech
    • Automatic compiling and running so you can focus on the code and the results
    • Fancy text editor with tabs, semantic highlighting, inline error bubbles, and inline values that are updated as you type
    • Watch window enables you to view graphical objects in your app (UI and images), inspect live objects as your app runs, create instances of new objects, and call methods
    • Code completion with inline type info and documentation makes learning new APIs fun
    • Uses standard .NET file and project formats so you can share code with other IDEs
    • Includes Xamarin.Forms and UIKit to build apps and SpriteKit and SceneKit to build games
    • Split screen support so you can keep documentation by your side
    • Execution powered by a new IL interpreter

 

If you are interested in learning more I already did a hands-on video available here or embedded below.  After some more experience I may follow up with a full blown review.  If you are a C# developer and are interested on developing directly on your device, check out Continuous.  It’s a pretty amazing piece of software.

 

GameDev News , ,

28. December 2015

 

A couple months back I got sick of having to wear a headset when doing video recording.  I had been using a set of Astro A30 headphones which gave solid results, but I found them uncomfortable after extended periods of recording and didn’t like being tethered to my machine.  So I decided to try out the ubiquitous Blue Snowball, which I demonstrated in this video.  Many people love this microphone… I am not one of these people.  There are virtually zero settings available to you, so if your setup isn’t ideal, the snowball fails.  More than a foot or two from the microphone it picks up nothing, to mention nothing of the horrific echo I was getting in my environment.  I ended up getting so many bad recordings that I switched back to my headset while hunting down an alternative.

 

Shopping around at most local stores it seemed the only options were Blue Snowballs and Yetis.  I certainly didn’t want to double down on that particular mistake.  Then I came across the Seirēn from Razer.  Other than the price tag and technical support, I’ve long been a fan of Razer products.  They are one of the few true premium brands in the PC space, from laptops, keyboards and mice and hopefully to microphones.  A quick search revealed mostly good reviews, so I decided to give it a shot.  What follows is an unboxing of the Razer Seiren.  It is not a proper review however as I haven't spent nearly enough time with it.

 

The Specs

Price

@$200 USD MSRP (purchased for $200 CDN)

Microphone specifications
• Power required / consumption: 5V 500mA (USB)
• Sample rate: 192kHz
• Bit rate: 24bit
• Capsules: Three 14mm condenser capsules
• Polar patterns: Cardioid, stereo, omnidirectional, bidirectional
• Frequency response: 20Hz – 20kHz
• Sensitivity: 4.5mV/Pa (1kHz)
• Max SPL: 120dB (THD: 0.5% 1kHz)

Headphone amplifier
• Impedance: > 16ohms
• Power output (RMS): 130mW
• THD: 0.009%
• Frequency response: 15Hz – 22kHz
• Signal-to-noise ratio: 114dB

 

Images

 

The Box

ProductBox

 

Opened

boxOpen

 

Cables and Manual

 

CablesAndDocs

Front

 

Front

 

Back

 

Back

 

Audio Samples

Here are two sets of recordings, one at 1.5” foot range, the other at about 4”, done with the Blue Snowball and the Raer Seiren, both in the exact same spot and with out of the box settings:

 

Blue Snowball

Near Recording

Far Recording

 

Razer Seiren

Near Recording

Far Recording

 

Video Test

The following video is a test recording on YouTube, again with default settings.

General

30. November 2015

 

 

 

This entry in the Closer Look series is a bit different than normal.  First, Blade Engine is very much a work in progress, so expect bugs and flaws and minimal documentation.  Second, it’s actually built over top of an existing game engine, LibGDX.  Finally, it’s a game engine focused on one very specific genre – adventure games.  Given the popularity of hidden object games on mobile these days, there are no doubt a number of people looking for an appropriate engine.  So without further adieu, I present the Bladecoder Adventure Engine, an open source cross platform LibGDX based game engine and editor for creating adventure games.

image

As always there is an HD video version available here.

 

Meet Bladecoder Adventure Engine

 

Blade engine consists of two parts, the underlying game engine and the editor that is layered on top of it.  It is designed in such a way that you can work entirely in the editor and never once right a line of source code.  You assemble your game from a collection of Chapters, Scenes and Actors and added events and actions in the form of verbs.  If you want to modify the fundamental structure of the game itself, you are going to have to jump into the underlying source code.  Fortunately that is an option, as Bladecode Engine is hosted on Github and the source is available under the incredibly liberal Apache 2 license.

 

Blade Engine Features at a Glance:

  • Multi platform support: Android, IOS, Desktop (Windows, OSX, Linux) and HTML
  • Several animation techniques: sprite/atlas animation, Spine (cutout) animation and 3d model animation
  • 3d character support
  • Multiresolution to deal with different densities and screen sizes
  • Multilanguage support
  • Open source and free (as in beer and freedom)
  • Code free game creation possible

 

The heart of Bladecoder is ultimately the editor, so let’s focus there after we cover getting started.

 

Getting Started

 

To get started with Bladecoder you need to have Java and git installed and properly configured.  Bladecoder uses the JavaFX ui library so you will have to use JDK 8 or newer or be prepared to have to configure JavaFX manually in the build process.  You will also require an internet connection for the build process to succeed the first time. To start, from a terminal or command line, change to the folder you want to install Bladecoder and enter:

git clone https://github.com/bladecoder/bladecoder-adventure-engine.git

cd bladecoder-adventure-engine

gradlew build

gradlew run

 

There is an example repository, including the work in progress game The Goddess Robbery available in the repository https://github.com/bladecoder/bladecoder-adventure-tests.  You should probably clone this repository too, as this is perhaps the single biggest documentation source available right now.

 

The Editor

 

Assuming the compilation process went without issue above, you should now see the Adventure Editor, where the bulk of your work will occur.

image

 

Your game is composed of a collection of Chapters, which in turn contain Scenes.  Scenes in turn are a collection of Actors and organized in layers:

image

 

Game Props enables you to set global properties of your game:

image

 

Resolution enables you to quickly create scaling modes for supporting multiple device resolutions ( think Retina ):

image

 

While Assets enables you to import multiple defined assets include audio and music files, texture atlases, 3D models, images and more.

image

 

You organize your scene using the editor available in the center of the window:

image

You can place actors on different layers, define walk paths, etc.  Click the Test button to preview that scene in action.

 

The actual logic of your game is defined on the right hand side of the editor. 

Here you can set properties of your actors:

image

 

Create and edit dialogs:

image

 

Define sounds and animations:

image

 

Clicking the edit icon will bring up the appropriate editor:

image

 

While selecting an animation will preview it in the scene:

GIF

 

Finally Verbs are the heart of your application:

image

 

You can think of verbs an analogous to event handlers, and they can be applied at the world, scene or actor level.  There are also default verbs that will be fired if unhandled.  Think the generic “I don’t know how to use that” messages from adventure games from the past.

 

Let’s look at an example from the Scene, handling the Init verb which is fired when the scene is ready.

image

 

This verb causes the sequence of actions shown at the bottom part of the above image to be fired when the scene init verb is called.  This causes the player to move, a dialog sequence, the player is scripted to drop an item, a state value is changed, etc.  You can create new elements by clicking the + icon:

image

 

And filling out the resulting form.  Each element has a different form associated with it.  Here for example is the result of the Say element:

image

 

Once complete simply click the play or package button:

image

 

Play launches the standard loader:

image

 

This screen can obviously be customized to each individual game.  While package brings up a form enabling you to build your game for a variety of platforms:

image

 

And that essentially is it.

 

Help and Community

This is certainly a weak point of the Bladecoder engine, it’s the result of a single coder, there is minimal help available and if you don’t know how to debug Java code, you will probably end up in trouble, at least at this point in it’s lifecycle.  There is currently no community or forum available for this engine but perhaps that will change in the future.  I spoke with the developer a few times however and he was very responsive and quick with fixes and answers.  He is also on twitter at @bladerafa if you want status updates on the project.

For now documentation consists of a minimal wiki although for the most part the best source of documentation is going to be from following the examples.

 

Summary

Make no mistakes, this is very much an under development engine so expect things to blow up spectacularly at any time.  When it does, you are probably going to be on your own figuring out why as there is no community to fall back on.  All that said this is a surprisingly robust tool that makes the process of creating an adventure game exceedingly simple.  Once the engine matures a little bit it will be an excellent tool for even a non-programmer interested in making adventure games.  For now though if you are competent in Java and interested in making an adventure game, this engine takes care of a hell of a lot of work for you and provides full source code for when it doesn’t.  Plus at the end of the day, the price is certainly good too!

 

The Video

Design, Art, Programming , , , ,

Month List

Popular Comments