OpenFL 1.2 released. Adds Tizen support

12. December 2013

 

OpenFL, the popular cross platform gaming library formerly known as NME have recently released version 1.2.  The biggest addition is Tizen support.  Full releaseimage notes are below:

 

We are happy to announce that OpenFL 1.2 is now available, and includes a brand-new platform target, Tizen!

Tizen is a new device platform, supported by Intel, Samsung, The Linux Foundation and other members of the Tizen Association. Through partnership with OpenFL Technologies, Tizen is helping support our development, so we can continue to create free and open-source software for you.

OpenFL 1.2 marks a transition, we have a brand-new library we are co-developing called “lime”, which we will speak more about in the future. We want to open our codebase to a wider audience, both to collaborate and to also enable further innovation in game frameworks and APIs. As we continue to invest into OpenFL, we are also opening doors to share the build tools and platform support of OpenFL across multiple frameworks.

In addition to Tizen support, we have made specific investment in streaming audio support, as well as other fixes and improvements. You will need some new libraries (“lime” and “lime-tools”) for this release, so run “openfl setup” again to be sure that you have everything you need to get going.

Other fixes include better multi-core support for parallel C++ builds, improved support for error output on mobile, we added “Assets.getMusic” for specifically requesting streaming audio (regardless of what is set in your project file), context lost events for Android when using OpenGLView (other platforms retain the GL context during a resize) and other audio fixes.

 

run ‘haxelib upgrade’ to get the newest version, otherwise head on over to the OpenFL webpage.

News




Awe6 framework release 2.0.572RC. Now supporting Haxe 3 and OpenFL

4. August 2013

 

I took a look at the Awe6 inverted game framework a couple months back and was quite impressed.  Shortly after I decided to go with Haxe the NME project announced the rebranding to OpenFL and move to Haxe 3, something I looked upon with some doom and gloom.  Fortunately it’s not that bad after all.  A couple days ago, Awe6 announced a new release supporting OpenFL and Haxe 3, among other things.

 

From the release notes:

 

RC 2,0,572

 

Major release, some breaking changes. Includes:

  • Haxe 3 compatible (refactor to new syntax and conventions)
  • NME drivers replaced with OpenFL drivers
  • Optional paramaters refactored (Floats, Ints, Bools made non-nullable)
  • Run script NME references replaced with OpenFL references
  • FlashDevelop templates updated for above
  • API docs not yet revised, due to chxdoc compatibility

 

Good news and good work.

 

So, I guess I have to eat some crow about the move to OpenFL.  At this point in time, Aw6, Flixel and Haxepunk are all compatible with OpenFL.  So it appears the move hasn’t fragmented the landscape as much as I expected.

Programming, News




Well… so much for using Haxe. RIP NME.

4. June 2013

I think I must have bad karma or something.  I spent several weeks looking at what technology to use for my upcoming game project.  After much research and community feedback, I decided to use Haxe with NME using the Awe6 framework.  Well, that plan didn't last long, dying with this statement:

OpenFL is an advancement of everything there is to love about NME, and NME is taking a backseat so it can focus on being a stable, powerful C++ backend for native platform support

 

You see Joshua Granick, the creator of NME just recently announced OpenFL a replacement of sorts for NME, or more accurately I suppose, a replacement built on top of NME.  Here is a blurb from the OpenFL announcement:

OpenFL combines years of work to provide for the industry-standard Flash API without the Flash plugin.

In order to succeed on mobile, it is important to take of advantage of device hardware, and to be as native as possible. That is why OpenFL allows direct access to device features using extensions, why OpenFL makes it possible to target iOS, Android and BlackBerry as fully native applications, and to accelerate the Flash API using OpenGL for a fast, productive development environment.

OpenFL can also target JavaScript directly, thanks to the Haxe Toolkit that powers the platform. Today, users of OpenFL can target HTML5 or the beta support for Emscripten and WebGL, while supporting the Flash Player runtime, for flexibility when providing content for the web.

OpenFL is free, hosted on Github under the permissive MIT open-source license. We invite to join as we build the best 2D development platform for the next 5-10 years.

Though Flash is a popular API, we believe in allowing the community to innovate in new ways to build games and applications. That is why OpenFL seeks to also provide an open platform, including OpenGLView, an accelerated way to build content for Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS, Android, BlackBerry and HTML5 using the WebGL API.

 

Elsewhere in the comments he says:

 

NME is going to become a "native media engine" that can enable Haxe frameworks to run on native platforms. It is used as an internal dependency for openfl-native

 

On one handed, this could be simply looked at as a rebranding of sorts of the NME project as well as a port to the (just released) Haxe 3 language.  That said, I personally think its a really stupid move.

 

Moving closer to the Flash branding seems… dumb.  Perhaps I am in the minority in that my interest in NME had nothing to do with it's Flash roots ( I have zero prior Flash experience ).  To say nothing of the fact the Flash brand isn't exactly thriving at the moment.  With some people it's an outright swear word!  Another thing I really didn't like about the above comment was:

and HTML5 using the WebGL API.

 

Suddenly it sounds like the HTML5 target just became HTML supporting WebGL.  Basically meaning Internet Explorer and 95% of mobile browsers just got dropped from the supported list.

 

Back to OpenFL and NME, even if it is a simple rebrand, that has dire side effects, especially as many of the library names are being changed.  Suddenly there isn't just one place to go for information, or one source of documentation.  Now you have the NME version and the OpenFL version.  If it is not just a simple rebrand, that is even worse.  I love shiny and new, but no way in hell I am going to start a new project on such a bleeding edge technology, especially coupled with the fact it is also tied to a new Haxe version.  As we have seen with Lua and Python, new versions don't always take!

 

So why not simply use Haxe/NME as it exists today?  Well frankly, one of the biggest downsides to NME was the bugs that crop up.  I encountered a couple during my evaluation and often this would have been a deal breaker.  That said, the NME folks moved fast, released fixes often the same day, so I had faith that any problems I might have encountered would be quickly fixed.  Now that NME support is "taking a back seat", I no longer have that confidence.

 

Don't get me wrong, I am not saying OpenFL is a bad thing, it's really too early to tell that.  In a few months/years time, OpenFL might be vastly superior to NME.  That said, I can't hitch my boat to a technology that is that young, nor can I hitch my boat to a technology that has been basically retired.  Maybe for my next project I will be able to use Haxe and NME…. er OpenFL.  Just not today.

 

Guess it's time to take a closer look at libGDX?

News, Programming




A closer look at the Awe6 Haxe inverted game framework

14. May 2013

I just recently took a look at available Haxe game engines and decided to take a closer look at two of them, HaxeFlixel and Awe6.  I started with Awe6, as frankly it's the most non-traditional of the two options and as a result, the most interesting to me.

 

Awe6 is a very design pattern heavy framework, built around the concepts of Inversion of Control and Dependency Injection, but reality is, just about every single design pattern that isn't the Singleton make an appearance.  As a direct result though, groking it all can be a bit confusing… my current understand of things took a great deal of digging through code and documentation to arrive at.  That is one immediate problem with Awe6…  the number of examples available can at best be called lacking.

 

I actually prefer going through working code than I do documentation, so this part is a rather large disappointment.  Then again, if I document awe6 usage, I suppose I will have more people interested in the material, double edged sword I suppose.  Anyways, so far as existing code to work from, there is the incredibly simple Hello World example, the demo in github and finally this example, probably the best of the bunch.

 

 

Ok, enough about what other people have done, now lets take a look at what I've discovered.  One of the ongoing trends of Haxe development holds true for Awe6.  If you are developing on Windows using FlashDevelop, the process is amazingly smooth.  If you aren't… it isn't.  I've given in and just work under FlashDevelop, at least when creating my projects.  I deploy to Dropbox then can reboot and test in Mac if needed.  The following instructions apply to Windows/Flashdevelop only.  You can get it working on other OSes, but its a pain.

 

Getting started is brutally simple.  If you haven't already, install Haxe and NME.

Open a command prompt and type haxelib install awe6

Then run the command haxelib run awe6 install

 

That's it.  Assuming you have FlashDevelop installed, you can now create a new awe6 Project via the project menu, otherwise refer to their site for details of working from command line.  It will create a fully fleshed out folder structure for you, but truth is, when just starting out this is a bit daunting.  That said, the Hello World example is a bit too trivial, so I set about writing something that is middle ground… a more advanced Hello World, or less advanced example project, depending on your perspective.

 

This awe6 sample simply loads an image and allows you to manipulate it using the left and right arrows.  The code:

 

 

import awe6.Types;
import nme.display.Bitmap;
import nme.display.BitmapData;
import nme.display.Sprite;
import nme.Assets;
import nme.Lib;

/**
 * ...
 * @author Mike
 */

class Main
{
	static function main()
	{
		var l_factory = new Factory( Lib.current, '<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?><data></data>' );
	}
	
	public function new()
	{
		// needed for Jeash
	}
}

class MyImage extends Entity  {
	private var _sprite:Sprite;
	
	public function new( p_kernel:IKernel )
	{
		_sprite = new Sprite();
		super(p_kernel, _sprite);
	}
	
	public override function _init(): Void {
		super._init();
		_sprite.addChild(new Bitmap(Assets.getBitmapData("assets/img/mechwarriorFrameScaled.png")));
	}
	
	override private function _updater(?p_deltaTime:Int = 0): Void
	{
		super._updater(p_deltaTime);
		if (_kernel.inputs.keyboard.getIsKeyDown(EKey.RIGHT))
			_sprite.x += 10;
		if (_kernel.inputs.keyboard.getIsKeyDown(EKey.LEFT))
			_sprite.x -= 10;
	}
}

class Factory extends AFactory {
	public override function createScene( type : EScene) : IScene
	{
		var scene = new Scene(this._kernel, type);
		scene.addEntity(new MyImage(this._kernel),true);
		return scene;
	}
}

 

 

 

Below is the Flash target if you want to play around with it (click it first to give keyboard focus, then price left or right arrow):

 

If you created a Awe6 project, you will notice the one above is a great deal simpler, but all the same basics are there.  Some of the terminology may certainly seem alien to you… Factory? Entity?  But don't worry, its not actually that difficult in the end.

 

Let's start with the Factory…  this is basically the "guts" of your game…  guts actually is probably the wrong analogy… brains would be a more accurate description or perhaps backbone.  Essentially you extend the Factory class to implement specific behaviour to your game by overriding a series of methods.  In our simple example above, we override the createScene method, but there are dozens of other methods and members that you can set.  The full documentation is right here.  Essentially the factory configures/defines your game, handles special actions ( such as the back key ), allows you to provide your own implementation of the Sessions, Preloader, Overlay, etc…  

 

So, if Factory is the brains or backbone of your application, Scenes are the meat of it.  This is how you organize your game into manageable pieces.  You could create a Scene for say… the title screen, one for when the game is playing, one for displaying the high scores, one for credits, one for settings, etc.  On top of this, literally, you have the Overlay, which is basically a top level UI or HUD if you like.  Your Factory class can create one, but I believe you can also create one at the Scene level as well.

 

After Scene, we have entities… simply put, these are "things" in your game, visible or not.  This could be… your main player, an enemy or a simple proximity trigger.  Entities can in turn contain other entities.  A Scene can contain numerous entities which themselves can contain many more.  Each entity will receive an update() call per tick for updating itself.  That's the bare basics of the hierarchy of objects and that just scratches the surface… it doesn't touch on other aspects such as Agendas ( state machines ), Session ( game state ), Preloader ( asset loading/caching ), or many other aspects of the framework.  We also don't touch on the kernel yet, which is a very important concept that we will talk about in a moment.

 

Now, lets take a quick look at how our code works, in order of execution.  When our program's main() is called, we simply create an instance of Factory, a class we define that inherits from AFactory.  We pass in the context as well as a simple empty configuration in this case.  As part of the process ( we will look a bit deeper in a second ) our Factory classes createScene method is called.  In createScene, we create a simple scene and add a MyImage entity to it. MyImage is a simple Entity that contains a Sprite class holding our mech image.  In the updater method ( called each tick when the entity needs to update ), we check the kernel for input, and move our position accordingly.

 

Now, understanding exactly what is going on behind the scenes is probably the trickiest part, so lets take a closer look at the process.

 

As we mentioned earlier, the Factory class is critical to your game, forming it's backbone, setting major configuration settings and perhaps most importantly controlling scene creation.  This is where execution begins.  You inherit from AFactory, but awe6 remaps it to an appropriate version depending on your platform ( you can see this logic in action right here, the same trick is performed for a number of classes ), all of the platform specific implementations simply provide platform specific functionality, but ultimately inherit from this guy, AFactory.hx.  It's kinda confusing at first, but you only really need to involve yourself in the details if you are trying to grok the source code.  The most important part of of AFactory to understand at this point is this call:

 

inline private function _init():Void
{
#if haxe3
config = new Map<String,Dynamic>();
#else
config = new Hash<Dynamic>();
#end
_configure( true );
_driverInit();
}

 

The call _driverInit() is of critical importance.  This is where the kernel is created.  What is the kernel, other than the object we keep passing around?  Well if Factory is the backbone of your game, Kernal is the backbone of awe6.  Essentially, kernel IS the game engine, and ultimately it is created by your Factory class ( or more specifically, the class your factory inherits from ).  So, obviously kernel is important, let's take a look at it's Init() method, it will make a great deal of things clear:

 

override private function _init():Void

{

super._init();

_view = new View( this, _context, 0, this );

_processes = new List<IProcess>();

_helperFramerate = new _HelperFramerate( factory.targetFramerate );

_isPreloaded = false;

 

// Perform driver specific initializations.

isDebug = factory.isDebug;

isLocal = _driverGetIsLocal();

_driverInit();

 

// Initialize managers.

assets = _assetManagerProcess = new AAssetManager( _kernel );

audio =_audioManager = new AudioManager( _kernel );

inputs = _inputManager = new InputManager( _kernel );

scenes = _sceneManager = new SceneManager( _kernel );

messenger = _messageManager = new MessageManager( _kernel );

_view.addChild( _sceneManager.view, 1 );

_addProcess( _assetManagerProcess );

_addProcess( _inputManager );

_addProcess( _sceneManager );

_addProcess( _messageManager );

_addProcess( _audioManager );

 

// Set defaults for visual switches.

isEyeCandy = true;

isFullScreen = false;

 

// Signal completion to the factory and initialize factory-dependent components.

factory.onInitComplete( this );

 

session = factory.createSession();

session.reset();

_preloader = factory.createPreloader();

_addProcess( _preloader );

_view.addChild( _preloader.view, 2 );

}

 

This is where the various subsystems are created ( assetManager, audio, input, etc… ) and started running ( via addProcess call ).  Then you will notice the code calls back into the Factory, calling the onInitiComplete method.  At this point, the Factory now has a copy of the kernel and the kernel has a pointer to the factory.  One other very important call for program execution is 

_view.addChild( _sceneManager.view, 1 );

View is something drawn on screen, in this case the main window.  In sceneManager, this is where we go full circle, with the call:

scene = _kernel.factory.createScene( p_type );


This in turn is what calls our derived Factory class's createScene method, causing the Scene to be created, our entity to be added to the scene, etc...

 

The bright side is, you don't really need to know ANY of this to make use of Awe6.  I just personally hate using a framework if I don't understand process flow.  It's a clever architecture, decoupling key systems and allowing for you to organize your own code in a clean manner, while still enabling communication between various systems.

,




Choosing a Haxe NME game engine

12. May 2013

Now that I have decided to go with Haxe and NME, there is the question of which game engine to use.  You may be thinking to yourself "isn't NME a game engine"?  No, not really, although it performs some game engine-y functions.  NME is more like a cross platform Haxe implementation of a Flash like development environment.  A game engine is built on top of this layer as ideally makes me life easier.  So, what are the options then?

 

Build my own

Well first of all there is the option to use nothing.  NME is fairly high level as it is, so the "cost" of building a game engine on top of it is much lower than with many other language/library combinations.  This has the advantage of removing a layer of code I am not intimately familiar with.  On the other hand, I'm lazy and in the business of creating a game, not an engine.  If someone else wants to do the work for me, and freely at that, who am I to say no?

 

HaxeFlixel

http://www.haxeflixel.com/

Flixel is one of the most common Flash 2D game frameworks, and HaxeFlixel is a Haxe port.  The reference documentation is pretty solid.  I have read that HaxeFlixel is a bit further along than our next entry.  The engine itself is state driven, with a state being the fundamental organization model of your game, while your game loop basically flips between states.  Examples of states would be say… Playing, MainMenu, HighScore, etc…  Flixel targets the most of the major targets including iOS, Android, Mac and Windows as well as Flash.  I don't believe HTML5 is supported.

 Status: Under active development

 

Sample HaxeFlixel code from here. ( a Menu state ) :

package;
 
import org.flixel.plugin.photonstorm.FlxDisplay;
import nme.Assets;
import nme.geom.Rectangle;
import nme.net.SharedObject;
import org.flixel.FlxButton;
import org.flixel.FlxG;
import org.flixel.FlxPath;
import org.flixel.FlxSave;
import org.flixel.FlxSprite;
import org.flixel.FlxState;
import org.flixel.FlxText;
import org.flixel.FlxU;
 
class MenuState extends FlxState
{
    override public function create():Void
    {
        #if !neko
        FlxG.bgColor = 0xff131c1b;
        #else
        FlxG.bgColor = {rgb: 0x131c1b, a: 0xff};
        #end 
        FlxG.mouse.show();
         
        //create a button with the label Start and set an on click function
        var startButton = new FlxButton(0, 0, "Start", onStartClick);
        //add the button to the state draw list
        add(startButton);
        //center align the button on the stage
        FlxDisplay.screenCenter(startButton,true,true);
    }
 
    //The on click handler for the start button
    private function onStartClick( ):Void
    {
        //Tell Flixel to change the active game state to the actual game
        FlxG.switchState( new PlayState( ) );
    }
     
    override public function destroy():Void
    {
        super.destroy();
    }
 
    override public function update():Void
    {
        super.update();
    }
}

 

 

HaxePunk

http://haxepunk.com/

HaxePunk is another popular Flash game framework that was ported to Haxe.  Instead of being organized around States like Flixel, HaxePunk is built around entities and scenes, a rather more traditional design.  Haxepunk seems to support the same targets as HaxeFlixel, which means most of the CPP targets ( iOS, Android, Windows, Mac, etc… ) but no HTML5.  Reference docs are pretty complete.

Status: Under active development.

 

Sample code taken from here.

 

 

package scenes;
 
import com.haxepunk.Scene;
import com.haxepunk.HXP;
 
class GameScene extends Scene
{
    public function new()
    {
        super();
    }
 
    public override function begin()
    {
        add(new entities.Ship(16, HXP.halfHeight));
        spawn(); // create our first enemy
    }
 
    public override function update()
    {
        spawnTimer -= HXP.elapsed;
        if (spawnTimer < 0)
        {
            spawn();
        }
        super.update();
    }
 
    private function spawn()
    {
        var y = Math.random() * HXP.height;
        add(new entities.Enemy(HXP.width, y));
        spawnTimer = 1; // every second
    }
 
    private var spawnTimer:Float;
}

 

 

Firmament Game Engine

http://martamius.github.io/Firmament.hx/

Another Haxe 2D game engine, this one supports almost every platform, and unlike Flixel and FlashPunk, that includes HTML5.  Like the others, it is completely open source.  Reference docs are OK, but a little light on description.

Status: Last github commit was 2 months ago as of writing.

No sample code located.

 

Stencyl

http://www.stencyl.com/

Stencyl is an interesting option.  It's a bit higher level than the other frameworks we mentioned earlier, as you can see directly below, Stencyl has an IDE.

Stencyl
In some ways, its much more similar to higher level tools like Construct 2 or Gamemaker in that you visually author your game.  Stencyl however is powered by Haxe and you can drop down to the Haxe code level if you want.  That said, it is a commercial product, so if you want to publish to iOS or ( I believe… the site doesn't make it obvious either way ) Android, you need to pay.  Documentation is pretty solid.
 
Status: Commercial product under active development.
 
No sample in this case due to the unique nature of the product.
 
Stencyl is certainly worth checking out, but probably not a good fit for the project I am working on, as I want the blog posts to be code focused and Stencyl abstracts most of that away. 

 

Citrux Engine

https://github.com/alamboley/CitruxEngine

CitruxEngine is a port of the Flash based game engine.  Sadly it seems to have been abandoned 

Status: Last update was 8 months ago.  May simply be complete but on first glance appears to be a dead end.

Sample code from here.

 

 

package fr.aymericlamboley.test;

import aze.display.SparrowTilesheet;
import aze.display.TileLayer;

import box2D.dynamics.contacts.B2Contact;

import com.citruxengine.core.CitruxEngine;
import com.citruxengine.core.State;
import com.citruxengine.math.MathVector;
import com.citruxengine.objects.CitruxSprite;
import com.citruxengine.objects.Box2DPhysicsObject;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Baddy;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Coin;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Crate;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Hero;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.MovingPlatform;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Platform;
import com.citruxengine.objects.platformer.box2d.Sensor;
import com.citruxengine.physics.Box2D;
import com.citruxengine.utils.ObjectMaker;
import com.citruxengine.view.spriteview.SparrowAnimationSequence;
import com.citruxengine.view.spriteview.SpriteLoqAnimationSequence;
import com.citruxengine.view.spriteview.SpriteView;

import com.eclecticdesignstudio.spritesheet.SpriteSheet;
import com.eclecticdesignstudio.spritesheet.importers.SpriteLoq;

import format.SWF;

import nme.Assets;
import nme.geom.Rectangle;

class GameState extends State<GameData> {

    public function new() {

        super();
    }

    override public function initialize():Void {

        super.initialize();

        _ce.gameData.dataChanged.add(_gameDataChanged);

        var box2d:Box2D = new Box2D("Box2D");
        //box2d.visible = true;
        add(box2d);

        //ObjectMaker.FromMovieClip(new SWF(Assets.getBytes("Assets/LevelA1.swf")).createMovieClip());

        var background:CitruxSprite = new CitruxSprite("background", {x:0, y:0, view:"Assets/background.jpg"});
        add(background);

        var physicsObject:Crate = new Crate("physicsObject", 
{x:250, y:200, width:70, height:75, view:"Assets/crate.png"});
        //var physicsObject:PhysicsObject = new PhysicsObject("physicsObject", {x:100, y:20});
        //var physicsObject:PhysicsObject = new PhysicsObject("physicsObject", {x:100, y:20, radius:20});
        add(physicsObject);

        add(new Platform("platform1", {x:498, y:403, width:948, height:20}));
        add(new Platform("platform2", {x:0, y:202, width:20, height:404}));
        add(new Platform("platform3", {x:1278, y:363, width:624, height:20}));
        add(new Platform("platform4", {x:1566, y:165, width:20, height:404}));

        var spriteSheet:SpriteSheet = SpriteLoq.parse(ApplicationMain.getAsset("Assets/heroSpriteLoq.xml"), "Assets");
       
        var tileSheet:SparrowTilesheet = new SparrowTilesheet(Assets.getBitmapData("Assets/heroSparrow.png"), 
Assets.getText("Assets/heroSparrow.xml"));
        var heroTileLayer:TileLayer = cast(view, SpriteView).createTileLayer(tileSheet, "hero");
        var hero:Hero = new Hero("hero", {x:100, y:20, width:60, height:135, 
view:new SparrowAnimationSequence(heroTileLayer, "idle")});

        add(hero);

        spriteSheet = SpriteLoq.parse(ApplicationMain.getAsset("Assets/baddySpriteLoq.xml"), "Assets");
        tileSheet = new SparrowTilesheet(Assets.getBitmapData("Assets/baddySparrow.png"), 
Assets.getText("Assets/baddySparrow.xml"));
        var baddyTileLayer:TileLayer = new TileLayer(tileSheet);
        var baddy1:Baddy = new Baddy("baddy1", {x:440, y:200, width:46, height:68, 
view:new SparrowAnimationSequence(baddyTileLayer, "walk")});
        add(baddy1);

        var coin:Coin = new Coin("Coin", {x:Std.random(400), y:Std.random(300) + 100, radius:30, 
view:"Assets/jewel.png"});
        add(coin);
        coin.onBeginContact.add(_recoltCoin);

        view.setupCamera(hero, new MathVector(320, 240), new Rectangle(0, 0, 1550, 0), new MathVector(.25, .05));
    }

    override public function update(timeDelta:Float):Void {

        super.update(timeDelta);
    }

    private function _gameDataChanged(object:String, value:Dynamic):Void {

        trace(object + " - " + value);
    }

    private function _recoltCoin(ctc:B2Contact):Void {

        var hero:Hero = Std.is(ctc.m_fixtureA.getBody().getUserData(), Hero) ? 
ctc.m_fixtureA.getBody().getUserData() : Std.is(ctc.m_fixtureB.getBody().getUserData(), 
Hero) ? ctc.m_fixtureB.getBody().getUserData() : null;

        if (hero != null) {

            remove(Std.is(ctc.m_fixtureA.getBody().getUserData(), Coin) ? 
ctc.m_fixtureA.getBody().getUserData() : ctc.m_fixtureB.getBody().getUserData());
            _ce.sound.playSound("collect");
        }
    }
}

 

 

Cocos2D for Haxe

https://github.com/ralcr/cocos2d-haxe

It's Cocos2D… for Haxe ported from Cocos2D for iPhone.  I really don't want to try to explain the Cocos2D family tree… it's… confusing.

Status: Last updated on Github 4 months ago.  Not encouraging.

Sample code from here.

 

 

import cocos.support.UIImage;

class Sample_UIImage {

    public function new(){
        var uiimage = new UIImage().initWithContentsOfFile("grossini.png");
        uiimage.onComplete = callback (onComplete, uiimage);
        //flash.Lib.current.addChild ( new flash.display.Bitmap ( new Girl(0,0)));
    }
    function onComplete(uiimage:UIImage) {
        flash.Lib.current.addChild ( uiimage.bitmap );
    }

    public static function main(){
        haxe.Firebug.redirectTraces();
        flash.Lib.current.stage.scaleMode = flash.display.StageScaleMode.NO_SCALE;
        flash.Lib.current.stage.align = flash.display.StageAlign.TOP_LEFT;
        new Sample_UIImage();
    }
}

 

 

Spur

https://github.com/PixelPounce/Spur

A component based game engine.  It appears to be young and hasn't been updated in a long time, a bad combination so I am ignoring it.

 

Hydras

A port of the PushButton engine.  A component based game engine built over top of NME.  Supports many targets, but hasn't been updated in a while.  Documentation?  None, zilch, nodda.  

Status: Last updated about a year ago

Sample code from here:

 

package ;

import com.pblabs.components.scene2D.CircleShape;
import com.pblabs.components.scene2D.SceneAlignment;
import com.pblabs.components.spatial.SpatialComponent;
import com.pblabs.components.tasks.FunctionTask;
import com.pblabs.components.tasks.LocationTask;
import com.pblabs.components.tasks.RepeatingTask;
import com.pblabs.components.tasks.SerialTask;
import com.pblabs.engine.core.PBContext;
import com.pblabs.engine.core.PBGame;
import com.pblabs.engine.core.SignalBondManager;
using Lambda;

using com.pblabs.components.scene2D.SceneUtil;
using com.pblabs.components.tasks.TaskUtil;
using com.pblabs.engine.core.PBGameUtil;
using com.pblabs.engine.util.PBUtil;

class Demo
{
    public function new()
    {
        //Setup logging.
        com.pblabs.engine.debug.Log.setup();

        var game = new PBGame();
        game.addBaseManagers();

        //The main "context". This is equivalent to a level, or a menu screen.
        var context :PBContext = game.pushContext(PBContext);
        //This method is via 'using' SceneUtil
        var scene2D = context.createBaseScene();
        scene2D.sceneAlignment = SceneAlignment.TOP_LEFT;
        var layer = scene2D.addLayer("defaultLayer");

        //Create our blob that we will move around.
        var so = context.createBaseSceneEntity();
        // var blob = context.allocate(com.pblabs.components.scene2D.RectangleShape);
        // blob.borderRadius = 10;
        var blob  = context.allocate(com.pblabs.components.scene2D.CircleShape);
        // blob.radius = 30;

        blob.fillColor = 0xff0000;

        blob.width = 100;
        // blob.height = 300;
        blob.parentProperty = layer.entityProp();
        so.addComponent(blob);
        so.initialize("SomeSceneObj");

        var topLeft = scene2D.getAlignedPoint(SceneAlignment.TOP_LEFT);
        var topRight = scene2D.getAlignedPoint(SceneAlignment.TOP_RIGHT);
        var bottomRight = scene2D.getAlignedPoint(SceneAlignment.BOTTOM_RIGHT);
        var bottomLeft = scene2D.getAlignedPoint(SceneAlignment.BOTTOM_LEFT);

        //This method is via 'using' SceneUtil
        so.setLocation(50, 100);
        //This method is via 'using' TaskUtil
        so.addTask(new RepeatingTask(
            new SerialTask(
                LocationTask.CreateEaseOut(topLeft.x + blob.width / 2, topLeft.y + blob.height / 2, 2),
                LocationTask.CreateEaseOut(topRight.x - blob.width / 2, topRight.y + blob.height / 2, 2),
                LocationTask.CreateEaseOut(bottomRight.x - blob.width / 2, bottomRight.y - blob.height / 2, 2),
                LocationTask.CreateEaseOut(bottomLeft.x + blob.width / 2, bottomLeft.y - blob.height / 2, 2)
            )
            ));

        //Prevents the first frame have the location at (0,0)
        scene2D.update();
    }

    public static function main()
    {
        new Demo();
    }
}

 

Flambe

https://github.com/aduros/flambe

Unfortunately it's web and Flash only so a no-go for me.

 

AWE6

https://code.google.com/p/awe6/

Awe6 is an inversion-of-control / component based game engine.  If you've never heard of IoC or Dependency injection, let me show you this wonderful example from Stack Overflow that shows IoC at it's simplest.

Traditional way:

Class car {

Engine _engine; Public Car() { _engine = new V6(); }

}

Inverted Way

Class car {

Engine _engine;

Public Car(Engine engine) { _engine = engine; }

}

var car = new Car(new V4());

Essentially you are "injecting" functionality into your class, as here, you "Inject" the engine type into the car via the constructor.

Alright, enough about IoC and Dependency Injection, back to Awe6.

Awe6Overview

The above graphic is the overview from the Awe6 site.  The framework has fairly good documentation.

Status: Most recent change was a couple days ago:

Sample code from here:

 

 

package demo.scenes;
import awe6.core.Scene;
import awe6.extras.gui.Text;
import awe6.interfaces.EAudioChannel;
import awe6.interfaces.EMessage;
import awe6.interfaces.EScene;
import awe6.interfaces.ETextStyle;
import awe6.interfaces.IEntity;
import awe6.interfaces.IKernel;
import demo.AssetManager;
import demo.entities.Bouncer;
import demo.entities.Sphere;
import demo.Session;

class Game extends AScene
{
    public static inline var TIME_LIMIT = 30;
    private var _timer:Text;
    private var _score:Int;

    override private function _init():Void
    {
        super._init();
        isPauseable = true;
        isSessionSavedOnNext = true;
        _session.isWin = false;
        var l_textStyle = _kernel.factory.createTextStyle( ETextStyle.SUBHEAD );
        #if js
        // for js performance boost (realtime filters very constly)
        l_textStyle.filters = [];
        l_textStyle.color = 0x020382;
        #end
        _timer = new Text( _kernel, _kernel.factory.width, 50, Std.string( 
_tools.convertAgeToFormattedTime( 0 ) ), l_textStyle );
        _timer.y = 70;
        addEntity( _timer, true, 1000 );

        _kernel.audio.stop( "MusicMenu", EAudioChannel.MUSIC );
        _kernel.audio.start( "MusicGame", EAudioChannel.MUSIC, -1, 0, .5, 0, true );
        for ( i in 0...10 )
        {
            addEntity( new Sphere( _kernel ), true, i + 10 );
        }
        _kernel.messenger.addSubscriber( _entity, EMessage.INIT, handleSphere, Sphere );
        _kernel.messenger.addSubscriber( _entity, EMessage.DISPOSE, handleSphere, Sphere );
    }
    
    public function handleSphere( p_message:EMessage, p_sender:IEntity ):Bool
    {
// trace( p_message + " " + p_sender );
        return true;
    }
    

    override private function _updater( ?p_deltaTime:Int = 0 ):Void
    {
        super._updater( p_deltaTime );

        _score = Std.int( _tools.limit( ( 1000 * TIME_LIMIT ) - _age, 0, _tools.BIG_NUMBER ) );
        if ( _score == 0 )
        {
            _gameOver();
        }
        _timer.text = _tools.convertAgeToFormattedTime( _age );
        var l_spheres:Array<Sphere> = getEntitiesByClass( Sphere );
        if ( ( l_spheres == null ) || ( l_spheres.length == 0 ) )
        {
            _gameOver();
        }
    }

    override private function _disposer():Void
    {
        _kernel.audio.stop( "MusicGame", EAudioChannel.MUSIC );
        super._disposer();
    }

    private function _gameOver():Void
    {
        if ( _score > _session.highScore )
        {
            _session.isWin = true;
            _session.highScore = _score;
        }
        _kernel.scenes.next();
    }

}

 

Ash Entity Framework

https://github.com/nadako/Ash-HaXe

This is a Haxe port of the Ash Framework a popular entity framework.  Unlike earlier examples, this is not a game engine, but may be an option as NME provides a great deal of the functionality you would normally require from a game engine.  That said, it is marked as PRE-ALPHA… that's pretty early on.  It's pretty active development wise but Haxe specific documentation is basically non-existent.

Status: Last commit 5 days ago.

Sample code from here:

 

package net.richardlord.asteroids;

import flash.display.DisplayObjectContainer;

import ash.tick.ITickProvider;
import ash.tick.FrameTickProvider;
import ash.core.Engine;

import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.BulletAgeSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.CollisionSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.GameManager;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.GunControlSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.MotionControlSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.MovementSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.RenderSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.SystemPriorities;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.AnimationSystem;
import net.richardlord.asteroids.systems.DeathThroesSystem;
import net.richardlord.input.KeyPoll;

class Asteroids
{
    private var container:DisplayObjectContainer;
    private var engine:Engine;
    private var tickProvider:ITickProvider;
    private var creator:EntityCreator;
    private var keyPoll:KeyPoll;
    private var config:GameConfig;

    public function new(container:DisplayObjectContainer, width:Float, height:Float)
    {
        this.container = container;
        prepare(width, height);
    }

    private function prepare(width:Float, height:Float):Void
    {
        engine = new Engine();
        creator = new EntityCreator( engine );
        keyPoll = new KeyPoll( container.stage );
        config = new GameConfig();
        config.width = width;
        config.height = height;

        engine.addSystem(new GameManager( creator, config ), SystemPriorities.preUpdate);
        engine.addSystem(new MotionControlSystem( keyPoll ), SystemPriorities.update);
        engine.addSystem(new GunControlSystem( keyPoll, creator ), SystemPriorities.update);
        engine.addSystem(new BulletAgeSystem( creator ), SystemPriorities.update);
        engine.addSystem(new DeathThroesSystem( creator ), SystemPriorities.update);
        engine.addSystem(new MovementSystem( config ), SystemPriorities.move);
        engine.addSystem(new CollisionSystem( creator ), SystemPriorities.resolveCollisions);
        engine.addSystem(new AnimationSystem(), SystemPriorities.animate);
        engine.addSystem(new RenderSystem( container ), SystemPriorities.render);

        creator.createGame();
    }

    public function start():Void
    {
        tickProvider = new FrameTickProvider( container );
        tickProvider.add(engine.update);
        tickProvider.start();
    }
}

 

Please let me know if I have missed any!



Personally I am leading towards Flixel ( community size and maturity level ), but am going to take a closer look at the Awe6 engine first. If neither works for me, I will simply roll me own!

,