Subscribe to GameFromScratch on YouTube Support GameFromScratch on Patreon
17. July 2018


Are you looking for an open source cross platform HTML5 powered game engine, that’s open source, free and comes with a complete editor in addition to the underlying framework?  Perhaps the Wade Game Engine by Clockwork Chilli is what you are looking for.  While open source, WADE is shipped under a custom license you should take note of.  The TL;DR version of the license:

This license allows you to make games and non-games, for any purpose including selling and licensing, without paying anything to Clockwork Chilli. However you must not:

  • Distribute non-compiled (or non-minified) versions of Clockwork Chilli's source code.
  • Create a product that competes with WADE.

You can run WADE directly in the Chrome browser or can download a local installed version for Linux, Mac and Windows platforms.  If you want to learn more, be sure to check out the WADE game engine in action in this video or embedded below.

GameDev News ,

12. July 2018


Tilengine is a 2D graphics engine that replicates 16bit style graphics, including SNES Mode 7 effects.  It previously was available under the MIT license, but the rendering core was proprietary.  Now the entire package has been released under the LGPL license.


Details from the Tilengine forum:

Tilengine is now a complete open source project. I've released the full source code under the LGPL license, that allows usage in closed source applications as well as in open source projects.


I've opened it because Tilengine is now a mature project that requires more work than I can do in my spare time. Previous version was released under the MIT license, but kept the rendering core as a closed source component, distributed as a prebuilt binary. I hope that this movement will encourage more people to adopt it, either to use in their own projects, or to contribute to it helping to expand the Tilengine community.


GitHub project doesn't include prebuilt binaries or external dependencies anymore. If you don't want to build the library yourself, the official place to get the prebuilt binaries for every supported platform is in its itch.io profile, just as before. Please keep in mind that as of this writing, binaries on itch.io aren't yet updated and still hold old MIT-licensed 1.21 binaries. I'll post a note when they get updated.


This new 2.0 release number reflects the change of philosophy. This release is nearly the same as the older 1.21, but has a new feature: the ability to create multiple instances of the engine and switch between them with a global context mechanism.

If you are interested in learning more about Tilengine, be sure to check out our hands-on video:


For more details about the change of Tilengine to the LGPL license, be sure to check out the following video:

GameDev News

28. June 2018


Lately we’ve featured a couple RPG Maker style game engines targeted at creating JRPG style games, including RPG In a Box and Smile Game Builder.  Today we are looking at RPG Playground, the work of a single developer.  RPG Playground is built using the Haxe programming language and the Kha framework, another topic we’ve covered recently.


Right now RPG Playground isn’t incredibly full featured, it’s got world building tools, a nice collection of tiles and animated sprites to work with and a basic game scripting system.  In time the developer intends to add the ability for artists to add their own content while giving programmers the ability to extend the engine and create a game with no need for an artist.  Here is the developers ultimate master plan for the project from the Road Map:

  1. Build a tool that allows anyone to make their own Role Playing Games, and easily let others play their game.
  2. Make sure artists can make an RPG using their own graphics, without the need of a programmer.
  3. Make sure programmers can make a game without the need of an artist.
  4. Programmers will extend the engine, so any game type can be build at this time: platformers, 3D, … .


If such a project sounds interesting, be sure to check out our hands-on video with RPG Playground.

General, Design

13. June 2018


With Apple’s recent unfortunate decision to deprecate OpenGL support in iOS and Mac OS moving forward this will be the end to the only graphics API that worked natively across all platforms.  I think many developers would be willing to ignore the Mac OS market, but the iOS market is just too big for most people to ignore.  What then are theImage result for opengl logo alternatives to using OpenGL?  In this article we are going to look at exactly that topic.


Use a game engine and let them worry about it!

This is the category probably the majority of developers are going to fall under.  If you use an engine like Unity or Unreal this entire thing becomes a non-issue.  These engines generally already support a number of different rendering options, including native Metal support.  For other small or open source engines such as Godot, CopperCube, Shiva, Cocos, etc this is a bigger problem as they now potentially have to dedicate more time, money and/or resources to support yet another renderer… or drop support for Apple platforms completely.  Unless they rely on some kind of abstraction layer for rendering, life just got a bit more annoying for every single game engine manufacturer that previously supported Apple platforms.

The following engines have Metal support out of the box:

  • Unreal Engine
  • Unity
  • Lumberyard
  • Armory(via Kha)
  • Stingray (now defunct)


Use Vulkan + MoltenVK

A lot of game developers and engine developers specifically were planning to, or already have, implemented Vulkan rendering support.  Vulkan is a lower level alternative to OpenGL, from Khronos Group, the same people behind OpenGL.  Like Direct3D 12 and even Apple’s Metal, Vulkan is designed in a closer to the hardware manner, to better maximize new graphical functionality in modern GPUs.  Working in Vulkan takes a lot more effort than working in OpenGL or similar higher level APIs, but it is cross platform much the same way as OpenGL was.   The catch…  it doesn’t work on Apple products.   Ugh.  Ok, how then is this a solution?  We there is a product called MoltenVK that enables Vulkan to run on Apple’s Metal.  


Use an Abstraction Layer

Another option I’m really partial too… letting someone else do all the work!  There are a handful of low level cross platform graphics APIs that take care of the work for you.  So if you don’t want to use an existing game engine, but also don’t want to deal with rendering intricacies for each platform, this could be a great option.  Well will discuss available cross platform layers.


bgfx

A cross platform “bring your own engine/framework” graphics rendering layer with bindings for several programming languages an renderers, including Metal ( and OpenGL, Direct3D, WebGL and more).  No Vulkan support however, at least not yet.


kha/kore

Kore is the open source C framework that kha is built on top of.  Kore supports a ton of renderers including metal.  You can learn more about kha in this video.


ogre

Ogre straddles the line between game engine and framework.  Either way, ogre3d has a metal renderer for iOS and MacOS.


The Forge

This one is fairly new to me, it’s a cross platform rendering framework that also supports Metal.


Veldrid

Veldrid is a .NET based rendering and computer library that supports Metal (as well as VUlkan, D3D11 and OpenGL, GL ES).  I have no personal experience with this library and it seems somewhat young from a developmental perspective.


SDL… maybe?

There are mutiple mentions and forks of SDL for supporting Metal.  I’m not sure if any are complete or still supported.


Implement A Metal Renderer

Of course you’ve always got the option of buckling down and implementing a Metal renderer for MacOS and iOS platforms.  Of course your work will only be useful on Mac/iOS platforms.  If you are interested in learning more about Metal you can learn more here.


Stick with OpenGL

Of course you’ve always got the option of just sticking with OpenGL.  Deprecated doesn’t mean it wont run on existing devices, just future ones.  Publish your game as it is now and let Apple deal with the fallout of their bad business decisions.


Programming ,

31. May 2018


Now that Armory3D is fully funded an installable version will be available for download any day now.  Armory is a game engine built using the Haxe programming language over the Kha framework that runs inside the open source graphics application Blender.  The timing of this release is ideal, as it was recently announced the Blender Game Engine is being removed from Blender.


Armory is a game engine I’ve been excited for for some time now.  You can learn more about Armory here, access the complete documentation here and download the source code here.  Additionally there are a series of examples available here with more complicated/complete templates available here.  Hopefully the full version will be available for download in the next few days.


I fully intend to do a tutorial series covering using the Armory game engine, which hopefully I will be launching soon.  However in the meantime I created this introduction to Armory which should illustrate to you why this engine has me as excited as it does.  Of course being built on top of Blender, you are also going to have a solid understanding of Blender to make used of Armory3D.  Thankfully, I’ve got you covered there with both a text based and video based Blender tutorial series to get you started.


Video Link

GameDev News, Programming , ,

See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

Month List

Popular Comments