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27. September 2018


One of the most challenging things when just starting game development is handling art in your game.  Most programmers have the artistic ability of a slightly blind tree toad, so what are they to do?  Well, you can scour the internet, tons of great free content out there, but there’s 100x more garbage as well.  Then you have the struggle of trying to get all of your content you grabbed from disparate sources to look good.  Or you can use one of the free content packs linked below.  Most of the follow assets have all you need, in a consistent art style, to create a game… and they are free!


Free game art pack resources:

Additionally the following two sites are great collections for finding resources like those mentioned above:


For more details on these resources, be sure the check the video below.  If you have an additional recommendation for complete free game art kits, please let me know in the comments!

Art


30. August 2018


Due to it’s popularity in the professional game industry, I get all kinds of requests for C++ based game engines.  That is exactly what this guide is, a collection of game engines that use C++.  This is not about game engines that are written using C++, many if not most game engines are at least partially written using C++, instead it covers engines where you (can) primarily use C++ in developing an actual game using the engine.  So without further ado, let’s jump into the list of (3D only) game engines that (can) use C++ to develop games.


The game engines, in no particular order:

CryEngine (Learn More)

Lumberyard (Learn More)

Unreal Engine

OGRE  *Technically a renderer

G3D Innovation Engine (Learn More)

Godot (Learn More)

Torque3D

Banshee Engine (Learn More)

Source Engine

Limon Engine (Learn More)

idTech

Leadwerks

IrrLicht

Urho3D (Learn More)

Toy Engine (Learn More)

Panda3D (Learn More)

Esenthel (Learn More)

Tombstone Engine (C4 successor)

PhyreEngine

Unigine

Shiva

LumixEngine (Learn More)


The list is not comprehensive but tries to at least get most of the options out there.  If I missed something, please let me know in the comments below.  For more information on all the engines listed above, be sure to check out the following video.  Any engine with a learn more link to the right of it means we have previously covered this engine in video form.


Programming


4. August 2018


Romain Guy, a developer on the Android graphics team, just released Filament, an open source Apache 2.0 licensed PBR based renderer for Android, Linux, MacOS and Windows.  Filament was designed to be as small as possible and with optimal performance on Android.


The renderer currently possesses the following features:

APIs
  • Native C++ API for Android, Linux, macOS and Windows
  • Java/JNI API for Android, Linux, macOS and Windows
Backends
  • OpenGL 4.1+ for Linux, macOS and Windows
  • OpenGL ES 3.0+ for Android
  • Vulkan 1.0 for Android, Linux, macOS (with MoltenVk) and Windows
Rendering
  • Clustered forward renderer
  • Cook-Torrance microfacet specular BRDF
  • Lambertian diffuse BRDF
  • HDR/linear lighting
  • Metallic workflow
  • Clear coat
  • Anisotropic lighting
  • Approximated translucent (subsurface) materials (direct and indirect lighting)
  • Cloth shading
  • Normal mapping & ambient occlusion mapping
  • Image-based lighting
  • Physically-based camera (shutter speed, sensitivity and aperture)
  • Physical light units
  • Point light, spot light and directional light
  • ACES-like tone-mapping
  • Temporal dithering
  • FXAA or MSAA
  • Dynamic resolution (on Android)

The Filament renderer is currently used in the Sceneform ARCore augmented reality framework.  Filament is exceedingly well documented and is a great read for anyone working on a renderer, even if you have little interest in using Filament in your own project.  The Github page contains documentation on getting started and the source contains several examples on how to use Filament.

GameDev News


2. August 2018


Think Silicon just released GLOVE (GL Over Vulkan … yeah, I don’t get how they make that work either) an open source middleware component that makes it so you can run OpenGL ES on Vulkan.  Available for Android, Linux and Windows, it seamlessly translates OpenGL called to Vulkan at runtime.  The code is available on GitHub under the LGPL v3 open source license.

Details of how GLOVE works from the Github page:

GLOVE functionality

GLOVE (GL Over Vulkan) is a software library that acts as an intermediate layer between an OpenGL application and Vulkan.

GLOVE is focused towards embedded systems and is comprised of OpenGL ES and EGL implementations, which translate at runtime all OpenGL ES / EGL calls & ESSL shaders to Vulkan commands & SPIR-V shader respectively and finally relays them to the underlying Vulkan driver.

GLOVE has been designed towards facilitating developers to easily build and integrate new features, allowing at the same time its further extension, portability and interoperability. Currently, GLOVE supports OpenGL ES 2.0 and EGL 1.4 on a Linux platform, but the modular design can be easily extended to encompass implementations of other client APIs as well.

GLOVE is considered as a work-in-progress and is open-sourced under the LGPL v3 license through which it is provided as free software with unlimited use for educational and research purposes.

Future planned extensions of GLOVE include the support for OpenGL ES 3.x and OpenGL applications.

Keep in mind this is a pretty early release and has only been tested on a small subset of hardware with mixed results.  You can find a great deal more technical information on how GLOVE works and how to extend it in this document.  Keep in mind, this is a fairly new technology and only has been tested on a small subset of devices.  You can read more about this release here.

GameDev News


28. June 2018


SketchFab is one of my favorite online model resources, a resource that I recently featured in the Free 3D Models Resources guide a few days back.  Earlier this year SketchFab launched a beta online store where users can buy and sell 3D models using the excellent SketchFab infrastructure.  Today, that store is out of beta and officially released.  Until July 4th SketchFab is offering a 10% off discount with the code SKETCHFAB10.

The Sketchfab Store combines our powerful browser-based 3D player and Model Inspector to let buyers scrutinize every aspect of a model including textures and topology in real-time. And with VR and AR support out of the box providing immersive ways to review models before purchase, our store take the guesswork out of purchasing 3D files online, an industry first.

But we haven’t stopped there. During the past six months we’ve solicited feedback from buyers and sellers and regularly added new features in response to your recommendations. We developed a new model page layout for store models that’s better optimized to sell content and surface the information that’s relevant to buyers. We’ve also made some adjustments to our search system to highlight relevant results in the Sketchfab Store while continuing to support our vibrant existing community of creators.

If you are interested in becoming a seller on SketchFab, be sure to check out their sellers guide available here.  If you are a game developer, SketchFab has excellent integration into a variety of game engines including Godot, Unity and Unreal.  The also have an open API making integration into your own engine or site a breeze.

Art


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