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6. September 2018


Recently we have broken down lists of 3D game engines that use the C++ language or C# language as a programming language for game logic.  Today we are going to look at game engines using the Lua programming language.  This doesn’t mean the game engine was created using the Lua language, instead we are covering engines that can be scripted using Lua.  In this list, unlike the previous two, we are going to include both 2D and 3D game engines in the list.  Additionally, for 2D engines, we will also include frameworks that don’t necessarily include level editors.


2D Lua Engines:

Defold (Learn More)

Corona

LÖVE (Learn More)

Gideros

Raylib (Learn More)

Instead


3D Lua Engines:

Spring RTS

GameGuru (Learn More)

Shiva

Leadwerks

Lumberyard (Learn More)

Roblox Studio

Urho3D (*Needs to be enabled)

Stingray|3DS Interactive


Defunct:

CryEngine (Deprecated)

Cocos2D (Undocumented)

PolyCode (Seemingly abandoned)

Marmalade (Deprecated)


Video

Programming


4. September 2018


Last week we took a look at the available C++ game engines, that is, 3D game engines that you can use C++ to write game logic.  Today we are going to look at C# game engines.  We are using the same criteria as the last list, the engine must be 3D, actively under development and programmable using C# (regardless to the language used to write the actual engine).  Over time I have covered several of these engines, in which case I will add a learn more link when applicable.


C# powered game engines, in no particular order:

Unity (Learn More)

CryEngine (Learn More)

Xenko (Learn More)

WaveEngine (Learn More)

Godot (Learn More)

Banshee (Learn More)

FLAX (Learn More)

UrhoSharp (Learn More)


If you have a suggestion that didn’t make this list, please let me know below!

Programming


30. August 2018


Due to it’s popularity in the professional game industry, I get all kinds of requests for C++ based game engines.  That is exactly what this guide is, a collection of game engines that use C++.  This is not about game engines that are written using C++, many if not most game engines are at least partially written using C++, instead it covers engines where you (can) primarily use C++ in developing an actual game using the engine.  So without further ado, let’s jump into the list of (3D only) game engines that (can) use C++ to develop games.


The game engines, in no particular order:

CryEngine (Learn More)

Lumberyard (Learn More)

Unreal Engine

OGRE  *Technically a renderer

G3D Innovation Engine (Learn More)

Godot (Learn More)

Torque3D

Banshee Engine (Learn More)

Source Engine

Limon Engine (Learn More)

idTech

Leadwerks

IrrLicht

Urho3D (Learn More)

Toy Engine (Learn More)

Panda3D (Learn More)

Esenthel (Learn More)

Tombstone Engine (C4 successor)

PhyreEngine

Unigine

Shiva

LumixEngine (Learn More)


The list is not comprehensive but tries to at least get most of the options out there.  If I missed something, please let me know in the comments below.  For more information on all the engines listed above, be sure to check out the following video.  Any engine with a learn more link to the right of it means we have previously covered this engine in video form.


Programming


29. August 2018


Looking for a small but full featured open source (LGPL) C++ 14 game engine with a built in editor?  If so, the Limon Game Engine might be the perfect choice for you!  Primary features of the Limon game are:

  • Model loading using Assimp
  • Skeletal animations
  • Realtime shadows
  • Rigid body physics
  • 3D spatial sound
  • Preliminary AI
  • In game map editor
  • Trigger volumes
  • API for Custom Trigger code
  • Loading shared libraries that has Trigger code
  • Creating Animations in editor

Additionally the engine is documented, with the manual available here.  The source code is cleanly written C++ 14 code and is available on Github.  The engine works on Windows, Mac and Linux with binaries available for download here.  If you are interested in seeing the engine in action, be sure to check out our hands-on video, embedded below.  There are additional videos available on the Limon YouTube channel, available here.

EDIT – The author in response to the video has released an updated version, with the editor key changed in 0.5.2 to the much more sensible F2 key.

GameDev News


28. August 2018


Godot 3.1 just got one step closer to a 3.1 release with the announcement of the first alpha as well as a freeze on Github pull requests.  This means no new functionality should be added to the Godot engine 3.1 release unless critical, with a focus instead on stability and performance improvements and refinement of existing features.

Details of the release from /r/gamedev:

You can read more about the development freeze right here.  Currently you need to build Godot 3.1 from source, although you can download nightly builds right here.  If you are interested in learning Godot 3, be sure to check out our ongoing tutorial series.

I have covered several of the new features already in video form:

GameDev News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

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