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19. July 2018


No, that was not a typo, Godot 2.1.5 RC2 was just released.  While 3.x is obviously the future, there are tons of developers with projects in progress that can benefit from these fixes.  This is especially true as many developers are waiting for OpenGL ES 2 support to be added back to Godot 3.


Highlights of this release from the Godot blog:

  • Android: APKs no longer include placeholder permissions that Google Play started complaining about
  • Android: Minimum SDK raised to 18, target SDK raised to 27.
  • Debug: New crash handler to generate backtraces when crashing on all desktop platforms (as in 3.0).
  • Editor: Tons of improvements to the "Godot 2 to 3 converter" tool, which can now convert many more resources than the one in 2.1.4. It even has an option to tentatively convert your scripts and change things like get_pos() (2.1) to get_position() (3.0) automatically.
  • Editor: Add class members overview in script editor.
  • Editor: New contextual menu in FileSystem dock.
  • Input: Hardware cursor support.
  • Input: Multitouch support.
  • iOS: Minimum SDK raised to 9.0, target SDK raised to 11.4.
  • OSX: Exporting for macOS from a Mac now generates a .dmg package.
  • Windows: New WASAPI audio driver (as in 3.0).
  • Performance optimisations.
  • Several crashes fixed, especially in Android backend.

You can read the entire change log here.

You can download the RC2 build here.  If you run into a problem with the build be sure to report it here.

GameDev News


18. July 2018


It has only been about 5 weeks since Unreal Engine 4.20 preview 1 was released so today’s full release of Unreal Engine 4.20 is impressively quick.  Some of the star features of this release include the new Niagara particle system, support for Visual Studio 2017 and beta Leap Magic support.  Perhaps the biggest new improvements in this release however come from Epic’s work on the mobile version of their smash hit game FortNite.  This release contains a massive number of mobile target improvements they gained from porting their own game to run on iOS and Android devices.

Mobile improvements alone include:

  • Improved Android debugging
  • Minimum Static Mesh LOD per platform
  • Minimum Skeletal Mesh LOD per platform
  • Hardware occlusion improvements
  • HLOD tools and workflow optimizations
  • Audio quality node
  • Audio variation culling
  • Audio downsampling per platform
  • Audio compression quality per platform
  • Shading model tweaks to better match PC
  • Reflection capture brightness fix
  • Landscape support for four layers
  • Landscape tessellation improvements
  • No memory cost for unused LODs, including:
    • Static Meshes
    • Skeletal Meshes
    • Material quality levels
    • Grass and foliage
    • High detail components and meshes
    • High detail emitters in Cascade
  • Settings based on device memory
  • Material memory reduction
  • Editor scriptability for bulk asset changes
  • Particle component pooling
  • Material parameter collection update cost

As always Epic have released a massive and comprehensive release note available here.  You can download the 4.20 UE4 release using the Epic Game Launcher.

GameDev News


18. July 2018


When I started GameFromScratch, by far and away the most common question I got was “what programming language should I use?”.  It’s amazing how much the world has changed in the last decade!  These days game engines are by far more important than programming language to the majority of developers, and one game engine has risen to the forefront of most peoples consciousness…  Unity.

I consistently cover a wide variety of game engines, here, on DevGa.me and on YouTube and one comment comes up far more often than any other...  “Why Not Just Use Unity?”.  Why would I use this game engine instead of Unity.  So I decided to take some time and answer exactly this question.  The short hand text version is available here as well as covered in a great deal more detail in this video.

GameDev News Programming


18. July 2018


The Defold Game Engine just released version 1.2.133.  The 1.2.133 release contains new features including the ability to live update aspects of your game, making it possible to push game updates out for published games without having to resubmit to the App Store.  This release also added hot reload support of collections, enabling you to make changes on the fly while running on devices.  If you are interested in learning more about the Defold Engine, be sure to check out our complete tutorial series available here.


Details from the release announcement:

Engine

  • DEF-3323 - Added: Collection hot reload support.
  • DEF-2411 - Added: Liveupdate store and verify manifest.
  • DEF-3375 - Fixed: Fixed crash when calculating particle instance emitter count
  • DEF-3330 - Fixed: sys.get_save_path now uses the platform path characters.
  • DEF-3359 - Fixed: Optimized engine size a bit by adding “-fno-rtti”.
  • DEF-3283 - Fixed: Try to resume WebAudio on mouse/touch interaction (and also handle a null DefoldSoundDevice)
  • DEF-3352 - Fixed: Native Extensions: Added support for Objective-C flags -f[no-]objc-arc and -f[no-]objc-arc-exceptions.

Work in progress

We’ve started with the new feature of caching the uploaded files/libraries to the extension build server.
This should improve turnaround times a lot as well as saving bandwidth for certain users.

We are also currently upgrading our Facebook SDK to the latest version.

GameDev News


17. July 2018


Are you looking for an open source cross platform HTML5 powered game engine, that’s open source, free and comes with a complete editor in addition to the underlying framework?  Perhaps the Wade Game Engine by Clockwork Chilli is what you are looking for.  While open source, WADE is shipped under a custom license you should take note of.  The TL;DR version of the license:

This license allows you to make games and non-games, for any purpose including selling and licensing, without paying anything to Clockwork Chilli. However you must not:

  • Distribute non-compiled (or non-minified) versions of Clockwork Chilli's source code.
  • Create a product that competes with WADE.

You can run WADE directly in the Chrome browser or can download a local installed version for Linux, Mac and Windows platforms.  If you want to learn more, be sure to check out the WADE game engine in action in this video or embedded below.

GameDev News


See More Tutorials on DevGa.me!

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