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9. March 2017

 

Back in November of last year, YoyoGames launched the first beta for GameMaker Studio 2.  Yesterday GameMaker Studio 2 was finally released.  GameMaker is a cross platform 2D focused game engine first released back in 1999.  Since then it has been used to create several popular games and game prototypes including such titles as Hotline Miami, Spelunky, Nidhogg, Badlands and many more. 

 

New features in GameMaker Studio 2 include:

With a completely redesigned User Interface, powerful new editors, enhanced monetization tools and more, GameMaker Studio 2 also introduces new features and improvements with:GMS

  • Level editing features: new layer-based level editing gives developers the ability to create more complex visuals with backgrounds, tiles, instances, assets and paths. New features also include level inheritance to create multiple levels at once, and an advanced tiling system that automatically selects the right tile for the job;

  • Cross-platform: available for Windows (Vista and above) for target development across multiple platforms including Windows Desktop, Mac OS X, Ubuntu, iOS, Android (including Android TV, Amazon Fire and Fire TV), PlayStation 4, Xbox One and more;

  • Workflow enhancements: a new innovative workflow and seamless path from DnD™ to actual code with multiple workspaces, user definable resource views, real-time updates from one editor to another, and cross platform source level debugging;

  • Native extensions: GameMaker Language (GML) supports all native targets to simplify the cross-platform development.

 

GameMaker is available starting at $99USD.  For more information be sure to check out the full release announcement blog available here.

GameDev News

3. March 2017

 

Esoteric Software, the makers of the 2D animation package Spine, have just released a runtime for Unreal Engine.  This runtime will enable you to use Spine authored content directly in Spine, via both Blueprint and C++.  If you have never heard of Spine, be sure to check out our hands on introduction available here (and the video embedded below).

 

From the announcement blog:

We are happy to announce the release of our brand new Spine Runtime for Unreal Engine 4!

The spine-ue4 runtime is based on spine-c and exposes the entire API through both Blueprint nodes as well as C++ components you can easily add to your game objects. Check out the extensive spine-ue4 documentation to get started and try out the sample project.

//esotericsoftware.com/img/blog/spine-ue4-bp.jpg

The spine-ue4 runtime is our newest member in the Spine Runtime family. While we did our best to make it as bug free as possible, there's always a chance you run into an issue with your specific project. Please report any bugs you find on our issue tracker.

Note that spine-ue4 requires Unreal Engine 4.15+!

 

For more information on Spine be sure to watch the video below!

GameDev News

3. March 2017

 

The Xenko game engine (previously Paradox3D) has been in beta for a couple years now, available for free use in binary form, with GPL licensed source code available.  If you are interested in learning more about the engine, we have a complete tutorial series available here.

Today Silicon Studio finally announced a release date and perhaps more importantly, licensing information although no actual prices yet.  From the Xenko blog:

We are pleased to announce that Xenko will exit its beta stage on April, 2017 with the first commercial version of the engine! As we’re still finalizing last details, the exact pricing model of the engine will be announced on the release day. We can let you know that:

  • We are planning to switch to a monthly subscription model with several tiers (education, indie, etc.)
  • The tier intended for indies will be free to use
  • The code source of the runtime will remain available for everyone
  • The code source of the editor will be accessible only to the upper tiers
  • We will move from GPL to a custom license allowing developers to modify the engine without having to open their game sources
  • The beta versions will remain available to download for users already developing a game on it

Interesting to see they will be moving away from the GPL license.  I have never been a fan of the GPL, but it has always offered a way to make the code available publically while retaining a revenue stream as well.  The devil is of course still going to be in the details.  Where does the runtime end and the engine begin when it comes to source code?  What are the details of this new proprietary code license going to be and of course, how much will each tier cost.  I guess we have to wait until April to find out.

GameDev News

3. March 2017

 

GitHub is perhaps the most popular source repository available today, while Unity is the most used game engine available today.  That said, neither ever worked particularly well with the other.  Today at GDC GitHub announced a new extension aimed at changing that.  The GitHub for Unity extension plugs directly into Unity and enables programmers and artists to work with Unity.

 

Details from the Github announcement:

Git helps millions of developers write and collaborate on code, but it's not always a practical choice for building games. With the GitHub for Unity extension, Unity game developers (artists and programmers alike) can better integrate Git and GitHub into their workflow, even if they're versioning large binary assets.

The GitHub for Unity extension integrates Git and GitHub directly into the Unity Editor. You can easily configure, collaborate, and manage your Git project in a dedicated window. The extension also includes Git LFS v2.0 support to store large binary assets and introduces file locking to help communicate with your team that you are working on difficult-to-merge files.

unity-screenshot

The GitHub for Unity extension is a first step towards unifying the GitHub and Unity workflows, and we'd love to hear your feedback to help guide us in the right direction. Watch for an alpha release over the next few weeks. We'll be making the project open source and publishing the extension in the Unity asset store soon after.

Many thanks to Emil "AngryAnt" Johansen for all his help in getting this project up and running.

Sign up now to get access to the GitHub for Unity plugin preview.

As you may have noticed from the last line, the release is a preview only at this point, so expect some bugs and warts for now.

GameDev News

2. March 2017

 

A new update has been released for CryEngine, bringing it to version 5.3.3.  Primarily a bug fix release, it also adds a new C# game template Rolling Ball.

 

From the release notes:

Game Templates


New: Added RollingBall template to the C# game template selection.

Refactored: Removed the Sydewinder application - this will be maintained as a separate project and is available as a download from the CRYENGINE Marketplace.

Audio


Audio General

Fixed: Bug where the MS compiler auto-vectorizer produced illegal instructions in mpeg code.

Core/System


Engine General

Fixed: Added ScaleformHelper to builds.

Fixed: Download of 5.3.1 SDKs package.

Fixed: Crash during Scaleform shutdown.

System

Fixed: Sydewinder doesn't close properly in Launcher.

Fixed: Encoding fixes for command line parsing.

Fixed: Crash reporter not producing crash dumps on Windows 7.

WAF

Fixed: ScaleformHelper usage by WAF (all configs) and CMake (release config).

Tweaked: Don't monolithically link MonoBridge into release configs, it's an optional feature.

Tweaked: Copy the right portaudio binaries (performance and release config).

CMake

Optimized: Don't copy unnecessary debug DLLs or PDBs to bin/win_x64.

Fixed: Compiler detection for VS2017. 

Action General

Fixed: The ability to load a second level after the first has been loaded.

C#

Fixed: The Input class not registering mouse -movement.

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